More Music From The Inbox 19 Sept 2018 Pillow Queens, White Cowbell Oklahoma, Art Brut and More!

More Music From The Inbox 19 Sept 2018 Pillow Queens, White Cowbell Oklahoma, Art Brut and More!
Artist: Pillow Queens, “Puppets”  
Album: State of the State

This female foursome from Dublin is fierce
Sounds like:  feel the strings pulling
Link/Listen/Watch:

Artist: White Cowbell Oklahoma, “Harder Come, Harder Fall”
Album: Seven Seas of Sleaze

A great band getting some love worldwide! Bang! Let’s Rock Out”
Album: N/A

Fun stuff out of London
Sounds like:  a little bit of punktastic!  
Sounds like:  some much needed edgy rock
Link/Listen/Watch:

Artist: Art Brut, “Wham! Pow! Link/Listen/Watch:

Artist: Dire Peril, “Heart of the Furyan”
Album: The Extraterrestrial Compendium

Pure power out of Sacramento, California
Sounds like:  System of a Down meets Rush
Link/Listen/Watch:

Artist: Posh Hammer, “After We Dance”  
Album: Dancing In Place

Interesting stuff from this Iranian/American brother-sister duo
Sounds like:  Synth-pop sweetness
Link/Listen/Watch:

Artist: Kings of Spade, “Bottoms Up”
Album: N/A

Grungy goodness out of Hawaii
Sounds like:  you should have another
Link/Listen/Watch:

You know what this site has been missing? A regular comic strip about music.

A regular comic strip about music. You know what this site has been missing?
Behold then Brother Rock, a creation of Randy Gabbard out of Nashville. Let’s start at the beginning. There aren’t a lot of music-related comic strips for some reason so when I find one, I’m all keen to promote it.

What are these music copyright hearings in Ottawa all about? Actually, it’s something musicians really need to happen.

In other words, the label has the sole and exclusive right to exploit that music for commercial gain. Adams first signed over copyrights to his work when he was 15. You may have heard about Bryan Adams appearance at hearings in Ottawa where he advocated for changes in Canada’s 100-year-old copyright laws. All he wants is one word changed. The hearings should finish up next week. By that time, it’s a little too late to enjoy the fruits of that labour, you know? In the United States, musicians recover their copyright 35 years after originally signing them away. This obscure note in American law has allowed people like Bruce Springsteen, Bob Dylan and other legacy artists to apply to finally own their music outright. This is why Adams was in Ottawa asking for changes that would bring Canadian provisions in line with what we see in the US. Under the current Canadian law, he has to be dead 25 years before he can get them back. Let’s break it down. The artist may get a piece of the proceeds, but has no ownership of that music. Another person who has filed to reclaim his early work is, yes, Bryan Adams. What’s exactly going on?  “My proposal is that we change one word in the Copyright Act section 14 (1) which is from “25 years after death” to “25 years after assignment” — so one word, that’s all we need to do.”
Naturally, there will be pushback from people who benefit from the old rules. This dates back to a 1978 revision to copyright law that granted artists “termination rights” to get their stuff back, providing they apply two years in advance. But this only applies to his US-held copyrights. It’s not until 25 years after the artists’ death that the artist gets to own the music. He still doesn’t have control over them and won’t until he’s dead 25 years. Back in 2009, he filed to have the copyright of 32 of the band’s songs (including “YMCA” and “In the Navy”) returned to him.   Let’s see what happens. When an artist signs a record deal, copyright of that artist’s works is normally assigned to the record label. More here. One of the heroes in this fight turned out to be Victor Willis, the original lead singer of the Village People.
What are these music copyright hearings in Ottawa all about? Actually, it’s something musicians really need to happen.

Geeks and Beats podcast, episode 201: Shirt-to-show? Yes or no?

Yes or no? Geeks and Beats podcast, episode 201: Shirt-to-show?
But we still have our fixed costs. Plus: we’re giving away a Blackberry Key2 smartphone! If you’d like to support the show (please?) go here. We break down the fault lines running through the music industry. If it’s September 19th, it’s It’s Daniel Lanois’ birthday. http://media.blubrry.com/geeksandbeats/p/www.geeksandbeats.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/S06E03-Shirt-to-Show.mp3
Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Email | RSS
Visit the Geeks and Beats website to sample all kinds of geeky goodness provided daily by our crack staff of writers and contributors who are offering up fascinating content every single day. Make us feel loved

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Reddit By the way, we’re a total non-profit operation that performs this selfless service for benefit of all humanity. How uncool. Listen now! Wearing a band shirt to that band’s concert? Alan tells us of the time he tried to hire him for $12/hour.

New report on concert ticket resellers is a PR nightmare for Ticketmaster

New report on concert ticket resellers is a PR nightmare for Ticketmaster
There’s a division of the company called Trade Desk not only helps resellers/scalpers circumvent the usual 6-8 ticket purchase limit placed on the general public, but also offers a system that automatically helps those purchasers post those tickets–maybe hundreds and hundreds of them–to sites like StubHub. In the past, company officials have publicly disparaged the resale ticket market, calling scalpers “pirates” and a threat to fans — even urging governments to criminalize the activity. And Ticketmaster gets to double-dip on service charges. You’re going to want to read the rest of the article. A new investigation by the CBC and the Toronto Star is going to be a PR nightmare. Reporters from the Star and CBC, posing as small-time scalpers from Canada, listened as sales staff pitched a proprietary Ticketmaster software program designed to help bulk buyers resell thousands of tickets. As gatekeeper to the entertainment industry’s most coveted events, Ticketmaster implements strict purchasing limits designed to prevent scalpers from using bots to buy tickets on a mass scale. And it gets better. From The Star:
LAS VEGAS—Inside a Caesars Palace conference room filled with some of the world’s most successful ticket scalpers, a row of promotional booths pitch software programs that help harvest thousands of sport and concert seats to be resold online at hefty markups. Seriously. Ticketmaster facilitates sales of massive amounts of tickets to secondary sellers? Apparently. But in one corner of the Las Vegas convention floor sat a conspicuous Ticketmaster booth welcoming scalpers with a solemn reassurance: Ticketmaster wants to share in the profits of the resale market by facilitating the mass scalping of its tickets — in direct violation of its own terms of use. In other words, the consumer-facing side of Ticketmaster clamps down on mass purchasing. Clustered around demonstration tables at the three-day Ticket Summit 2018 convention in July, discussion among scalpers inevitably centred on Ticketmaster, the world’s largest ticket supplier that has a near monopoly on major event seating in North America and the United Kingdom. This other side helps facilitate mass purchasing, which results in the secondary market being flooded with tickets being sold above face value.

How do you take on a hurricane? With SLAYER, of course

With SLAYER, of course How do you take on a hurricane?
Florence swung north and was downgraded to a Category 1. And this isn’t the first time Pittman (known as “Florida Man” in meteorological circles) has battled hurricanes. An American flag and SLAYER’s “Reigning Blood.”

Whatever Pittman did seemed to work, too. (Via The Daily Dot) With Hurricane Florence ambling towards the state still rated as a Category 4 a million people ordered to evacuate, Lane Pittman thought he’d come to the rescue. His weapons? His record includes a brawl with Hurricane Matthew (2016) and Hurricane Irma (2017). This is one of those stories that could only come out of Florida, the testes of America.

I’m not sure what kinds of musical weirdness this is, but I can

I’m not sure what kinds of musical weirdness this is, but I can
If you watch this with the sound off, it looks like this poor man is having some kind of seizure. after eatin a Nature Valley granola bar pic.twitter.com/H6enLMU4Nv
— CJ from 🐣. But if you turn up the volume, it takes on a whole new meaning. (@willis_cj) September 13, 2018

(Via Larry)

Looking to break your band internationally? Take a look at this.

Looking to break your band internationally? Take a look at this.
Chris McKee is the Toronto based author of Life on the road with the Wu-Tang Clan and has spent more than 20 years working as a booking agent and tour manager for dozens of Grammy & Juno winning musicians. In other words, if you need advice about breaking it internationally, he knows a thing or two.

Rock My World Canada, Chapter 4: Len

[Mike Carr has put together a massive volume on Canadian music history entitled Canadian Alternative & Indie Reference and Collector’s Guide. Find out more about Gandharvas and hundreds of other Canadian artists in the softcover edition of Canadian Alternative & Indie Reference and Collector’s Guide. Follow on Facebook and Twitter, too. Get your copy here. During the height of their popularity, the band’s lineup included Brendan Canning, who co-founded the indie rock band Broken Social Scene shortly after leaving Len. – AC]

Len is an alternative rock band from Toronto. They are best known as a one-hit wonder for their 1999 song “Steal My Sunshine”. Len was never able to repeat the success of “Steal My Sunshine”, but continued to put out albums until 2005 before a seven-year hiatus. The band consisted of siblings Marc Costanzo (vocals, guitar) and Sharon Costanzo (vocals, bass) and a revolving lineup of other musicians. This is the latest excerpt from his book. It’s an incredible discography of hundreds of bands.
Rock My World Canada, Chapter 4: Len

The Marketing of Rock’n’Roll

The Marketing of Rock’n’Roll
If you’re interested into the marketing machinery behind the popular song, here’s a two-part program from Terry O’Reilly’s CBC program, Under the Influence. Recommended.

Random music news for Monday, September 17, 2018

(Via Tom)
The oral history of the Judgement Night soundtrack is actually the story of hip-hop mating with rock. Why won’t The Killers’ “Mr. No wonder Taylor Swift is scared to pick up her mail
is that trial regarding Justin Bieber’s egging of his neighbour’s house still going on? Back at work after two weeks of time off and just in time for tonight’s Polaris Music Prize gala. (Via Moe) Some women are annoyed that the new iPhones are just too big for their hands. I mean, it’s been fourteen years! If you were ever a fan of Silverchair, you should read this. Bieber is also applying for US citizenship. There’s an app for that. Yep. Looking to jam with someone anywhere in the world? Michael Jackson’s Thriller: “The most inspiring album of all time.” Discuss. I’ll be the one in the back suffering from severe jetlag. Rick Astley…beer? Fine. If you’re gonna be in a K-pop band, think about who you’re going to date–or else. (Via Larry)
If you’re a fan of AC/DC, there’s a new book coming on the Bon Scott years this November. Brightside” leave the UK charts? Looks like George Michael left a lot of music behind when he died. Lenny Kravitz…toothpaste? Paul McCartney just scored his first #1 album in 36 years with his new record, Egypt Station…
…and Macca has something to say about Donald Trump. Check out this musical army that’s protesting against Trump. Well, wasn’t that nice of Metallica to do this in Winnipeg. Here’s a great history of the Pixies Surfer Rosa album. While we have Polaris, there are grumblings about the similar Mercury Prize in the UK. Why are so many older rockers getting into real estate? Take him. And now, the music news for September 17, 2018. Metallica reveals some sonic secrets about their new whiskey. Tony Bennett just nailed down a very obscure Guinness Book of World Records prize.
Random music news for Monday, September 17, 2018

New Music from the Inbox for September 17, 2018: Subways on the Sun, First Aid Kit, The Revivalists, & More!

They have a swinging pop sound that focuses on songwriting and soul-driven arrangements. Here’s one of the singles. The video pays homage to 70s horror movies.  
Watch:

Artist: First Aid Kit
Song: “Rebel Heart”
Album: Single

Swedish sister folk duo First Aid Kit wrote this song after an evening of playing occult board games. The upcoming LP promises sonic complexity, celebration, and catharsis. Artist: Subways on the Sun
Song: “Know It All”
Album: Single

Hailing from Seattle, indie rockers Subways on the Sun are getting ready to release their sophomore album later this week. This song was written during a depressed and anxious time in her life. Watch:

Artist: The Revivalists
Song: “You and I”
Album: Single

With a new album due out in November, New Ireland’ the Revivalists have released another single. Listen:

Artist: XXAIA
Song: “Smile”
Album: Single

 
Texas-born musician XXAIA has a unique sound whose vocals sound like a cross between Blondie and Annie Lennox. Listen:

Artist: Rob Gallo
Song: “Love Supreme (Work Together!)”
Album: Single

From his new album coming out early next month, Rob Gallo’s latest single is upbeat and fun. Listen: 

Artist: The Imperial Sound
Song: “A Man Like You”
Album: The New AM

A new band out of Chicago, the Imperial Sound just released their debut at the end of August. Apparently, Gallo wrote this song using the Garage Band app on his phone during a flight. Watch:

 
New Music from the Inbox for September 17, 2018: Subways on the Sun, First Aid Kit, The Revivalists, & More!

It was a deadly and weird weekend in music

It was a deadly and weird weekend in music
Three other people are listed as critically ill. A man and a woman, both in their twenties are dead after ODing at the Defqon.1 music festival in Sydney. Gunshots can be heard as someone places “La Cucaracha” on a harp. The shooting took place in Plaza Garibaldi. Unknown. The shooters escaped on motorcycles. The motive? Item 1: Five people shot in Mexico City by assassins posing as a mariachi band
If you’ve ever been to Mexico, you’ll know that mariachi bands are everywhere, especially in the country’s public places and plazas. (Via CNN)
Item 2: Two dead and three very ill after drug overdoses at an Australian music festival. Another 13 people were sent to the hospital with drug-related issues while 700 (!!!) sought some kind of medical assistance. There are two weekend items regarding death and destruction in the world of music. Friday night a group of men dressed in mariachi bands walked into a Mexico City restaurant and opened fire, killing five people. More details here. There is video of the killing.

Ever wonder how long-lost recordings are found and restored? Read this.

Ever wonder how long-lost recordings are found and restored? Read this.
The boy thinks it looks like a record though. It is round, metal, and old. When you start to dig into the history of lost records, you realize quickly that Paramount was not alone in its carelessness. Ever since recordings have been made, they’ve been misplaced, cast aside, or intentionally erased—sometimes because the labels simply needed more tape, and other times for more nefarious or foolish reasons. A young boy, fishing with his father on the banks of the Milwaukee River, spies a glinting object in the dirt. It could be any number of things: a hubcap, a large lid, the flat side of a pie pan. He and his dad go to take a closer look—and just like that, a piece of history is uncovered. Each in his own way is an archaeologist of lost music. What’s the story behind these discoveries and reissues? Keep reading. Every once in a while we hear about how a long-lost recording by a famous artist (John Coltrane, David Bowie, Jimi Hendrix, etc.) has been discovered and then restored. To learn more about how recordings are lost and what has been done to ensure we don’t lose them forever, I recently spoke with Grammy-winning mastering engineer Michael Graves, world-renowned collector and producer John Tefteller, and Resonance Records executive vice president and general manager Zev Feldman. They had found a metal master for Coot Grant and Socks Wilson’s “Uncle Joe,” originally released by Paramount Records in 1929. While many songs have gone missing over the century-and-a-half since audio recording was made possible, every year diligent researchers recover more and more of our nearly lost past. How could such an important label have been so careless with its own legacy? Let’s take a look at this article from Reverb.com.