New Music from the Inbox: Young Fathers, Rivah, Humans, and more!

Listen: 

Artist: Humans
Song: Going Late
Album: Going Late
Going Late is dynamic electro-pop. The rhythm gives it a feeling of perpetual motion, and I’m obsessed with the use of vocals as both a hip hop rhythmic tool and in uplifting choir melodies. Listen: Artist: Young Fathers
Song: Border Girls
This song is dynamic, empowering, and unexpected. Listen: 

Artist: IV League
Song: Lose Me
Big drums and expressive vocals make this alt-rock track boldly sensitive. Listen:

Artist: New Rose
Song: Poison Tree
Album: Crying Eyes
This psychedelic country/rock song is just so pleasant. Listen: 

Artist: Rivah
Song: Flood
Brisbane solo artist Rivah holds nothing back on this bold pop track about feeling alone and “remembering that you are loved and that you have to let love in.” It has the perfect builds and drops, the catchy chorus; everything about this song is huge. The pedal steel, the simple repetitive guitar riff, the relaxed vocals. It is mellow and simple, yet bubbles with undeniable energy. This is a song you can drift away into.
New Music from the Inbox: Young Fathers, Rivah, Humans, and more!

U2’s current stage set-up with the LED wall is technologically stunning

(Thanks to Michael for the link.) Fans who have seen U2 on the xPERIENCE + iNNOCENCE Tour have already witnessed the band’s PRG PURE10 LED Wall, the most sophisticated video screen apparatus ever taken out on the road. H
Here’s an interview with Frederic Opsomer, the CEO of PRG Projects, the company that built the wall. U2’s video crew chief, Stuart Heaney helps explains how U2 has been into these sorts of big-money video techniques for more than a quarter-century.
U2’s current stage set-up with the LED wall is technologically stunning

Rock My World Canada, Chapter 19: July Talk

Rock My World Canada, Chapter 19: July Talk
The band consists of singers Peter Drelmanis and Leah Fay, guitarist Ian Docherty, bassist John Warburton, and drummer Danny Miles. This is the latest excerpt from his book. July Talk released its self-titled debut album with Sleepless Records on October 16, 2012, with Universal Music Canada releasing an expanded version the following September 9 which went gold within 18 months. Follow on Facebook and Twitter, too. The band also received a Juno Award for Alternative Album of the Year in 2015. – AC]
July Talk is an alternative rock band formed in 2012 in Toronto. It’s an incredible discography of hundreds of bands. Their second album, Touch, was released on September 9, 2016.   [Mike Carr has put together a massive volume on Canadian music history entitled Canadian Alternative & Indie Reference and Collector’s Guide. Get your copy here. Find out more about this artist and hundreds of other Canadian artists in the softcover edition of Canadian Alternative & Indie Reference and Collector’s Guide.

Geeks and Beats podcast, episode 207: Travel guide 2018

Make us feel loved

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Reddit The World’s Most Popular Podcast™ has the gadget guide for anyone looking to make their escape this holiday season. If you’d like to support the show (please?) go here. And a quick getaway to somewhere warm doesn’t mean you have to give your tech the cold shoulder. Here’s the Ultimate Geek Guide to Travel Tech 2018: Nintendo Switch The most sought-after video game console of 2018 is clearly the Nintendo…
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By the way, we’re a total non-profit operation that performs this selfless service for benefit of all humanity. But we still have our fixed costs.
Geeks and Beats podcast, episode 207: Travel guide 2018

Music Canada Supports Music Education with New Program

This program aims to provide equitable access to quality music education by increasing musical instrument inventory in publicly funded Ontario schools, increasing public engagement to support music education, and connecting students’ learning experience to many aspects of Canada’s dynamic music industry. To qualify for the program, applicants must:
●  Be part of the English or French public or Catholic school systems in Ontario
●  Currently employ a music teacher
●  Have a demonstrated need for instrument repair
●  Have the school Principal’s approval to submit an application
Additionally, The Three R’s Music Program holds community instrument drives to collect gently-used instruments from Ontario communities. The portal allows schools to identify what type of refurbished instruments their music program needs most and enter up to 20 interments for repair. The program portal provides schools a one-stop location to facilitate requests and applications. Requests through the portal may be submitted until November 18, 2018. That’s why I love this new program from Music Canada. The inaugural drive in Lindsay was a success and the program is now accepting donations in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Areas. As someone who spent a lot of time in the band room in high school and then went on to study music in university, I am a huge supporter of any program that aims to improve music education. Schools are also able to enter in the information of a local repair shop so that repairs can be done in their community. Publicly funded schools in Ontario are able to submit expressions of interest in The Three Rs Music Program for instrument repair grants of up to $2500 as well as requests for refurbished instruments. Something to keep in mind if you have a band instrument sitting at home, collecting dust, and want to support a great cause. Music Canada’s new national affiliated non-profit, Music Canada Cares has a new program called The Three Rs Music Program.
Music Canada Supports Music Education with New Program

Rock My World Canada, Chapter 18: Mother Mother

Rock My World Canada, Chapter 18: Mother Mother
He recruited his sister Molly along with a friend from college, Debra-Jean Creelman, to accompany his own vocals for songs he had written the trio played as an acoustic act before adding drummer Kenton Loewen and bassist Jeremy Page. The band began in Heriot Bay in January 2005 when Ryan was at music school and wanted to start a band based on vocal-driven pop songs.   Longtime bassist Jeremy Page left the band in 2016. Here’s Mother Mother’s official website. – AC]
Mother Mother is an indie rock band based in Vancouver, British Columbia. This is the latest excerpt from his book. In 2015, they independently released their self-titled debut album under the name Mother. Retitled Touch Up, the reissue also featured several new songs. The band consists of Ryan Guldemond on guitar and vocals, Molly Guldemond on vocals and keyboards, Jasmin Parkin on keyboards and vocals, and Ali Siadat on drums. [Mike Carr has put together a massive volume on Canadian music history entitled Canadian Alternative & Indie Reference and Collector’s Guide. Get your copy here. Follow on Facebook and Twitter, too. It’s an incredible discography of hundreds of bands. They later changed their name to Mother Mother, and re-released the album on Last Gang Records in 2007. Find out more about this artist and hundreds of other Canadian artists in the softcover edition of Canadian Alternative & Indie Reference and Collector’s Guide.

Random music news for Monday, November 5, 2018

(Via Tom)
The lawyer for Chris Cornell’s ex-doctor–the guy being sued by Vicky Cornell–has responded to the lawsuit. The true cost of iPhone ownership over a lifetime is HOW MUCH? Tom Morello vs. What’s the future of stadium rock? And as for music news on November 5, 2018…

The Freddie Mercury biopic did very well at the box office over opening weekend. (Via Tom)
Was Drake profiled at a casino? If you have an autographed painting of a rock star, you might want to learn from this episode. (Via Larry)
Yes, there was an incident at Sony Music’s HQ in London. Interested in funding a Nash the Slash documentary? (Via Andrew)
The next time you need to rickroll someone, try this video instead. That’s a good question. He says so. Here’s how the filmmakers recreated Live Aid. Axl Rose to Donald Trump: “STOP IT!”
How realistic is the scenario in the old Rupert Holmes release “The Pina Colada” song? Yep. A data scientist takes a look. It’s still Astley flavoured, but it’s got something extra. Did you see Bohemian Rhapsody over the weekend? Today is the 11th birthday of the Android operating system. Details here. Can you imagine anyone doing anything like this today? Cheech and Chong. This guy says his cheese tastes better because he plays music to it. Any comments on comparing these two videos. Geez, George Harrison and Eric Clapton…
Rock star footstools and sofas? This is a really good read on the “15-year cultural excitement cycle.”
Random music news for Monday, November 5, 2018

The mother of the troubled teen who inspired Pearl Jam to write “Jeremy” speaks out

The mother of the troubled teen who inspired Pearl Jam to write “Jeremy” speaks out
Until now. Jeremy’s father has gone on record as being very angry about the song and the pain it has caused him. Ever since the song was released, they’ve been besieged by Pearl Jam fans wanting to know more about their dead son. The real Jeremy’s parents were not flattered or comforted by this. The report also features comments from Brittney King, a classmate of Jeremy’s who was in the room that day. Recalling when a kid at Eddie’s high school in Illinois shot the place up (no one was hurt except the fish in an aquarium that blew apart), Eddie wrote “Jeremy,” The song became of the major hits on the Ten album. In this TV report, Wanda Crane talks about the day her boy took his own life. On January 8, 1991, a very troubled 15-year-old Jeremy Delle walked into a classroom at Richardson High School in Richardson, Texas, pulled out of a .357 magnum and shot himself in the front of the entire class. His mother, though, has remained silent. Eddie Vedder, who had recently moved up from San Diego to join Pearl Jam (then still known as Mookie Blaylock) read about Jeremy in the paper. (Read more at Consequence of Sound)

Beastie Boys’ Sabotage: Another classic song, thanks to frustration

Ad-Rock thought it would be fun to “write a song about how Mario was holding us all down, how he was trying to mess it all up, sabotaging our great works of art.”
And with that, a classic was born. It would have still been OK, but he smashed the second camera during high-speed filming, which made the initial budget three times bigger (amount in words: $80,000),” according to Medium. He would push awful instrumental tracks we made just to have something moving toward completion.”
“Sabotage” was the album’s final track, written in part to kind of rub Mario’s face in it. They were working with an engineer named Mario Caldato, Jr., on Ill Communication, and Mario was “getting frustrated. 30. “They wanted a spoof video with a low budget tinge, a style of another time and Dodge chases. Take it from Radiohead and the Beastie Boys — sometimes things created from snark, frustration and sarcasm become things of beauty. The director would have kept to the budget if he hadn’t spilled water on the first rented camera, which he used to film underwater with only a sealed plastic bag to protect it. And is it any surprise the song was inspired by frustration? Turns out, there’s a pretty good one behind “Sabotage,” arguably one of their best-known tunes and best-loved videos. Then there’s the iconic video for the song, with the Beasties running around in ’70s-style cop uniforms and super awesome bad fake ‘staches. That’s a really calm way of saying that he would blow a fuse and get pissed off at us and scream that we just needed to finish something, anything, a song. Now that the Beastie Boys’ new book is coming out, so are all the stories behind their songs and videos. “We were totally indecisive about what, when, why and how to complete songs,” Ad-Rock explains in the book, which was published Oct. The whole video was pretty spontaneous: have concept, will film.
Beastie Boys’ Sabotage: Another classic song, thanks to frustration

Why do some songs fade out on record? Here’s an explanation.

The first is known in radio parlance as the “cold end.” This is when a song comes to a pronounced, final and almost dead stop. [This was my weekly column for GlobalNews.ca. To illustrate, let’s look at several examples. Where did the idea of fading a song into the darkness come from? Again, we can look to The Beatles for the singalong coda of Hey Jude. Jack White chose to end Seven Nation Army this way. – AC]
There are three ways a song can come to an end. And finally, there’s the fadeout, whereby the volume of the song decreases and decreases until there’s nothing left but silence. Keep reading for the answer. The second sort of song ending is the “last chord,” a method with no better example than the 54 seconds that end The Beatles’ A Day in the Life.
Why do some songs fade out on record? Here’s an explanation.

The next time your kids insist on listening to the same song over and over again in the car, think of this

It was an actual car with a Stig-like spaceman mannequin at the wheel with David Bowie’s “Starman” playing in the car on a loop. The next time you find grinding your teeth over this sonic assault, think of poor Starman. Total stunt. In about two years, its orbit will bring it with 5 million miles of Mars itself. The batteries must have run down long ago–unless this Tesla has solar panels to keep the music running. Its next meaningful close encounter with Earth will be in 2091. Starman and his car are now past the orbit of Mars, some 155 million aways. I get it. If you travel with kids in the car, you’re all too familiar with the horror of having to listen to the same songs over and over and over again. Remember when Elon Musk as SpaceX launched Musk’s original Tesla Roadster into space? Barring any collision or alien encounter, there’s no reason Starman won’t continue in his solar orbit for millions of years. Starman’s current location. Now imagine being in a car with the same song playing over and over again. Next stop, the restaurant at the end of the universe. Listen to the soundtrack from Frozen doesn’t seem so bad now, does it? pic.twitter.com/Ty5m8IjJpE
— SpaceX (@SpaceX) November 3, 2018

(Via Engadget) Still, kinda cool, right?
The next time your kids insist on listening to the same song over and over again in the car, think of this

Nope, radio is still not dead. If you still think so, read this.

Nope, radio is still not dead. If you still think so, read this.
The market’s comparatively small at about US $93m — but it’s doing better than the UK if you bear in mind Finland’s small population. Australian commercial radio has grown too — over the past year, metro stations growing 3.8% to a US $573m market (and there’s more from the regions, too). There are certain segments of the public that believe that radio is dead. The secret to achieve a growing radio industry could be as simple as this
Go to a radio conference in the US or Canada, and there won’t be very many smiling faces. Radio is actually more alive than ever. 3. The UK commercial industry has grown, over the past year, by 5.2%. Keep reading. And if I’m dead, why do I have to go to the bathroom?”
So here goes: my random thoughts on our post-postmortum radio landscape. Which takes us into… These three articles address the situation:
1. According to everyone from Jay-Z to entire national governments, the reign of radio is over. 2. These aren’t the stories you hear from the US and Canada; and I’m often asked why. In our time, radio is no longer defined by the technology that transmits it. As I argued in my book Radio 2.0: Uploading the First Broadcast Medium, through the centuries we have read print in many different forms: books, newspaper articles, scrolls, teletype, LED freeway signs, just to cite a few examples. In the immortal words of the famously and unexpectedly defeated Thomas Dewey in the presidential election of 1948, “If I am alive, what am I doing here? But in other countries, radio is behaving differently. Thought Number Two: Radio is better understood as an idea instead of a technology. Granted that the industry may be in a period of transition thanks to rapidly changing technology and consumer demands, but that doesn’t mean it’s dead. Their figures are harder to decipher, but July grew by 6.6% over June; and June grew by 17% over May. Thought Number One: Radio can no longer be defined by any single transmission medium. Basically the wags, wonks, and wise guys of the Internet have given up declaring that radio is deceased, but nobody quite knows what to think about it now. Music listening these days looks different. If not driving, they’re listening to radio while sitting around a breakfast table, or doing homework, or gathering at friends’ parties, those trusty AM/FM waves forever crooning on in the background. It’s not an easy answer. Yet why the gloom? Radio survived the tape, CD, and iPod. Think of any teen movie out of the 1980s or 1990s, and there’s a fair chance you can recall a scene of characters lounging in a car, singing along to the blare of a dashboard radio. Why did we think that we would always listen to broadcast sound via AM/FM and no other format? Keep reading. People don’t need a DJ spinning them new tracks that they’ll rush off to buy at a record shop; they pick their own songs on digital streaming services like Spotify. Keep reading. In the age of Spotify, it’s more popular than ever. There’s a general feeling in the US and Canada that radio is managing decline. Commercial radio in Finland is growing, too. It’s now a US $887m market. Once upon a time when we thought about radio we associated it with AM/FM. Thoughts on the post-“Radio is Dead” era
Paul, Jennifer, and I did a fun podcast at my house the other day in which we discussed what I have coined the post-“Radio is Dead” era. But in retrospect, that 20th-century way of doing and understanding radio may have been anomalous.

Weekly survey: Would you go see a gig starring at hologram? And if so, who would it have to be?

Weekly survey: Would you go see a gig starring at hologram? And if so, who would it have to be?
There’s a tech twist to this week’s survey question. Let me know in the comments section below. What if there was a way to see Michael Jackson perform with James Brown? Meanwhile, artists who are still alive are thinking “Great. This past Sunday (November 4), there was a concert at the Sony Centre in Toronto starring Roy Orbison. Or perhaps you’d like to mix and match, creating a band of dead superstars performing together? For example, what if there was a way you could see all four original Beatles perform together again? Now I have to compete with dead people.”
What are your thoughts on this? The technology is here and it’s getting better all the time with more deceased performers’ estates jumping on board. This is the question: Would you pay money to see such a show? Yes, the man has been dead since 1988, so he role was performed by a hologram. There was a live band with Roy’s hologram out front–and the ghostly image even interacted with the band during the show. And if so, who would you want to see? What about a full Nirvana reunion with a hologram Kurt out front?

Here are photos from Joe Bonamassa’s Toronto show

Here are photos from Joe Bonamassa’s Toronto show
After the song, Joe gets on the mic and says: “Folks, this is my 29th year in the music business. Lee Thornburg on trumpet from Supertramp and Tower of Power
Paulie Cerra playing Sax, from Stevie Wonder’s touring band
Two backup singers, Jade MacRae and Mahalia Barne, both from Australia

Some highlights of the night include that fast-paced start with “King Bee Shakedown,” played on a beautiful old Sunburst 1957 Fender Strat, before he moved to a few songs on Les Paul. “Slow Train” from his 2011 Dust Bowl album brought out a lovely old black pickguard Telecaster with a fantastic start by the tightest band, that completely resembled the sound of a slow train starting up, and once that train got rolling, Joe let Mahalia sing a few verses with her powerful voice. Joe kept the same Les Paul for “How Deep This River Runs” from the same album that featured a fantastic call and response solo at centre stage duel with his bassist Michael
For the next number, “Breaking Up Someone’s Home,” Joe brought out a 1958 Flying V Korina (one of only 98 made!)  and while every song had some tasteful guitar solo of some sorts, this one featured a great keys solo and trumpet solo. Staff photographer Andrei Chlychkov’s latest assignment was to snap some shots of the Joe Bonamassa show at the Sony Centre in Toronto on November 3. His two horn players had classy old school big music stands with Joe’s “JB” initials lit up on them as a nice touch. The lighting was clear and direct, and the stage plot was simple and well placed out, with Joe playing front and centre and he knows how to please the crowd, constantly walking back and forth during solos to the stage’s edge so everyone could get a view of his lightning fast hands playing more notes than most guys could in a year. Some other fantastic points of the night include at one point when Joe walked back to his amp repeatedly in between songs to tap an amp that was being temperamental, and said “This one’s on fire!,” so he was down to 4 amps at that point. Friday, November 2 and Saturday, November 3 brought one of the world’s leading guitar virtuosos and collectors to the Sony Centre in Toronto, along with a top-notch band and one very special guest on the Friday night. I’ve seen everything during that time make it’s way up on stage – food, bottles, naked pictures, but this is the first time I’ve ever had a motherfuckin’ snake up on the motherfuckin’ stage”. Here’s the setlist. Joe, known for his blues and rock riffs, and his attention to detail in sounds also has a huge guitar and gear following from his fans due to the size of his almost priceless collection, brought five guitar amps (two brand new Joe Bonamassa Fender 1959 80w Signature Twins, 2 Dumble Overdrive Specials and a Dumble cabinet) and a fantastic ever-changing lineup of guitars that made all the guitar gear fans drool with envy as he changed guitars for most songs to another and another unbelievably collectable guitar. Text by Craig McRae. Clearly, Joe’s fanbase has broadened. At the second-last song before the encore, there was some commotion on stage and everyone wondered what the heck was going on as Joe was dealing with something on stage, then got Reese to solo while he walked over to sidestage to talk to a Roadie, who then came out and seemed to grab something. Somehow, a snake had appeared on the stage (yes, an actual live snake) and was slithering around while Joe was playing a blistering guitar solo. Joe kicked the night off with no opening band, and got the evening off to a great start of over two hours of world-class playing from the fantastic group of musicians that join him on his tour:

Bassist Michael Rhodes – Famous session player who’s played with everyone from Buddy Guy, Garth Brooks, Elton John and even Taylor Swift
Drummer Anton Fig from the World’s Most Dangerous Band (David Letterman’s former) house band who has played with thousands of musicians that crossed his stage during his tenure there
Reese Wynans – Keyboardist from Stevie Ray Vaughan’s band Double Trouble – A blues guitar player couldn’t ask for a better keys player!   Albert king’s blues shuffle “Don’t You Lie to Me” on a tobacco sunburst Gibson 335 was recognizable with Albert’s signature playing all over the song with a beautiful vocal solo by Mahalia that would challenge Pink Floyd’s “The Great Gig In The Sky”. Joe then pointed out that his touring band consisted of “seven of the greatest musicians and one snake”. But this next song is a song about a boy and his pet snake Beauregard” before he rolled into one of his best-known numbers, the inspirational “Mountain Time.”
Joe’s fanbase has steadily been growing as he constantly tours, records, and films, before heading back out on the road again to start it all over again, and while this tour packed the Sony Centre for two nights, we can be assured that the next time we see him, he’ll have an even bigger following thanks to all of his hard work in playing and being the world’s best spokesperson for the blues! During the show, Joe and his band would toss in several little clips of other songs they’ve covered in the past:  ZZ Top’s “Waiting For The Bus,” Deep Purple’s “Hush,” and Anton started off one song with the iconic drum start to Led Zeppelin’s “Rock and Roll.”
For his one encore, Joe brought out his old Tele again and introduced the song like this: “Somethings on fire over there, been one of those nights, Snakes, fire–clearly we’re rocking too hard. Joe Switched it up to a Les Paul again to play the groovy “No Good Place For The Lonely” from his #1 blues charting 2016 album Blues for Desperation.

Random music news for Tuesday, November 6, 2018

Random music news for Tuesday, November 6, 2018
(Via Tom)
Here are some words that don’t often go together: “Russian anti-piracy watchdog.”
T.I. Stupid, stupid, stupid high school marching band…
If you remember the 90s, you might remember being stressed out by things such as this. Desperate to look smart in your next meeting? On this day in 1947, Meet the Press debuted on TV. On the other hand, nearly 10% of podcasts are now on Apple Watch. Now that you mention it, despite all the political turmoil, 1968 was an uneven year when it came to music. It’s still on, making it the longest-running TV show in history. Let’s investigate. The Spice Girls reunion is going ahead without Victoria Beckham. Oh, Diddy…
These solo pianists are making up to $10K a month on streaming music services. Why are so many people slow in getting into podcasts? Try the Douchebag Strategist. + cryptocurrency = Unhappy investors. As for music news on November 6, 2018…

Weekly Canadian music sales and streaming stats vs. Interesting: Global smartphone shipments are down 6% in the last quarter. Spotify plans to buy back up to $1 billion of its stock. This is one of the coolest rickrolls you will ever see. Someone needs to make a listicle for this: Why are there so many songs about masturbation? this time last year: Total albums, -21.3%; digital albums, -19.6%; CDs, -26%; vinyl albums, +26.9%; streams, +43.3% (1.517 billion streams in Canada last week). Not bad, considering it used to be a bitch to transfer a podcast to one of these things. It looks like Spotify is finally testing out an app for Apple Watch, too. This is good news: Elvis Costello seems to be on the mend. Another one: Rihanna doesn’t want Donald Trump to use her music at his rallies.