Random music news for Saturday, November 3, 2018

Random music news for Saturday, November 3, 2018
Yep. Let’s look at that. Although I do like the extra hour of sleep tonight. Maybe not. And the leading headphone brand in the world is…really? A streaming music service devoted to classical music? Some of Tupac’s belongings have been donated to a university. (Via Tom)
Why are people determined to bring back quadrophonic sound? Why would Apple ever want to buy a piece of iHeartMedia? If you’re a fan of Glenn Gould (as I am), this is pretty interesting news. Seriously. Led Zeppelin is appealing the retrial of the “Stairway to Heaven” vs. Let’s examine this. Here are my weekly music picks for GlobalNews.ca. Why is daylight saving time still a thing? Here’s music news for November 2, 2018. Armed police stormed the Sony building in London yesterday after two chefs(!!!) went at each other with knives. Spirit lawsuit. Cell phones and cancer? Let’s get rid of it. Ozzy and Sharon are sure an interesting couple. There’s a problem with the pier in Kingston, Ontario, named after Gord Downie. It’s for sale–and the price seems reasonable. A Canadian Afghan vet has released a song about the horrors of PTSD. Want to buy Aretha Franklin’s home in Detroit? Here’s another example of what I mean by that.

Bruce Springsteen to release a soundtrack album for his Broadway show

Bruce Springsteen to release a soundtrack album for his Broadway show
(introduction & song)
Tenth Avenue Freeze-Out (introduction & song)
Tougher Than The Rest (introduction & song) with Patti Scialfa
Brilliant Disguise (introduction & song) with Patti Scialfa
Long Time Comin’ (introduction & song)
The Ghost Of Tom Joad (introduction & song)
The Rising (song)
Dancing In The Dark (introduction & song)
Land Of Hope And Dreams (song)
Born To Run (introduction & song)
Here’s a trailer teaser. Here’s the tracklisting:
Growin’ Up (introduction & song)
My Hometown (introduction & song)
My Father’s House (introduction & song)
The Wish (introduction & song)
Thunder Road (introduction & song)
The Promised Land (introduction & song)
Born In The U.S.A. No one can get tickets to Springsteen’s one-man show on Broadway. Last I heard, the grosses of the 236-show run were somewhere north of $70 million and climbing. Come December 14, fans can get the next best thing to being in the audience: a two-CD/four-LP set entitled Springsteen on Broadway.

This court ruling could put a crimp into labels releasing album remasters and box sets

The legal action was lodged by ABS Entertainment, which owns a considerable oldies catalog.  And most of the pre-1972 songs played by CBS had indeed been remastered. However, there’s been a twist related to the recently passed Music Modernization Act in the US. The thinking has been that creating a new master (in this case, a re-master of the original) creates a new copyright, thereby preventing those songs and that album from falling into the public domain for another fifty-ish years. ABS claimed that CBS Radio had been over-extending its exemption and playing pre-1972 music without authorization. One way to do that is to go back to the master tapes of a classic album and remix it to modern standards so the enhanced audio quality will entice fans to buy the album again. And CBS Radio recently found itself getting sued for not paying for pre-1972 songs played, specifically under U.S. Tricky problem, though CBS attorneys cooked up a creative counterargument. Keep reading. In the US, this has especially been true for material recorded before 1972. This can be done with individual albums or with material included in box sets. Anyone want to weigh in on this? But there is another reason labels like remasters. They argued that if the oldies recordings in question were simply remastered after 1972, then federal copyright law applies. This has me wondering: If creating a new remaster doesn’t create a new copyright, will labels bother with reissues of pre-1972 material going forward? That explains all those Beatles, Elvis, and Dylan re-releases, doesn’t it? Record labels are always looking to squeeze the most out of the music in their catalogues. After all, the federal exemption only applies to post-1972 works. That cements the exemption for federal broadcasters, though state law gets tricky on older works.   Digital Music News takes it from here:
The year 1972 was an important demarcation line when federal copyright protection for recordings went into place. state laws.
This court ruling could put a crimp into labels releasing album remasters and box sets

Why do dogs like Bob Marley’s music so much?

As reported in The Guardian, scientists who study dogs and music–yes, that’s a job–have determined that Bob’s music is quite popular with the canine market because dogs prefer genres that mimic their own heartbeat–like Bob’s brand of reggae. Just as music can be used for therapy with humans, so it is with dogs. Here’s a sample. Studies like these have launched a new industry of dog-friendly music.   My two faithful English bull terriers both demonstrate preferences when it comes to music. RelaxMyDog was established in 2012 as an all-natural drug-free way of helping stressed-out dogs. Dogs really do love Bob Marley. And this isn’t just something for dog parents looking to overly pamper their fur babies. It may not sound like much to use, but having tested it on both my dogs, they seem to get something out of it. Music for Airports is a favourite. Anyone knows how heartbreaking/frustrating it is to have a dog with separation anxiety, hyperactivity, or a fear of loud noises (think thunderstorms).  

And the reggae fan really dug this one. On the other hand, Schmooze, the ten-year-old, prefers Bob Marley. With 10 million users a month, the company’s musical offerings have a huge following among dog owners. Music can be used to ease those anxieties and fears. Put on “Three Little Birds” or “No Woman No Cry” and she’ll immediately curl up next to me with a big smile on her face. Turns out that she’s not alone. See? It took less than 30 seconds for Squirt to start yawning and drift off with above mix. Squirt, the younger of the two, really mellows out whenever I play anything from Brian Eno’s ambient period.
Why do dogs like Bob Marley’s music so much?

Palaye Royale, Music: Not Impossible team up for accessible show

Palaye Royale, Music: Not Impossible team up for accessible show
She can indicate pitch with facial expressions. The idea is very simple: make the songs more accessible and enjoyable for everyone, even those who might not rely solely on their ears. The vibes can be adjusted from low, medium and strong vibes,” AltPress explains. This past summer, an interpreter named Lindsay Rothschild-Cross stole the show during Lamb of God’s tour. Our system comprises a set of wearable devices, software, hardware and wireless communication. She’s making it her mission to make concerts more accessible to ALL audiences. What’s not to love? The device syncs with the live performance and each of the five areas vibrate along with it. She mimed guitars and drums in addition to signing the lyrics and, according to the mother of the band’s three brothers, the interpreter learned the words on the spot. During concerts, she’s hooked up to the venue’s sound board so the music is directly in her ears, without any outside noise to distract her. Even better, the group brought out a sign language interpreter to perform with them, translating their lyrics into sign language. A video of her signing during their show in Austin went viral and she wound up being interviewed on Good Morning America and featured on CNN. To make a recent Las Vegas show more all-encompassing and welcoming, Toronto-based band Palaye Royale brought in a few friends and some cool tech: a device from a company called Not Impossible that surrounds the body with vibrations and pulses to help “feel” the music. The band played their songs, the concert attendees were geared up and got to experience the music, even if in a non-traditional way. The technology consists of a “vibro harness, two wristbands and two ankle bands. To help the people watching her, Rothschild-Cross told CNN she’ll sometimes add adjectives to describe an instrumental solo. Pretty impressive! The wearable set includes a harness, two wristbands and two ankle bands, supplying eight distinctive areas of vibration across the user’s body, or what we call a ‘Surround body experience.’”

While rare, sign language interpreters are sometimes hired by bands or venues to stand off to the side of the stage during concerts to help people with hearing impairments enjoy the show as much as anyone else. View this post on Instagram

No @palayeroyale are not…’Fu*#ing with your Head’ … what an amazing honour to be apart of a test launch for this absolutely incredible ground breaking technology for the hearing impaired @notimpossible @avnet and the Las Vegas band performing at @churchofrockandroll ✨🙏🏻🎶✨🙏🏻🎶🌟❤️#lasvegas #signlanguage #americansignlanguage #signedwithheart #lifeisbeautifulfestival #lifeisbeautiful #deafcommunity #asl #signlanguageinterpreter #palayeroyale #Repost @churchofrockandroll with @get_repost ・・・ One month ago tonight we hosted the incredible #GretaVanFleet #MusicNotImpossible #SarcasticLutheran #PalayeRoyale #DamienEchols and #ChristianBenner for an unbelievable experience that allowed the deaf and hearing community to experience music in a totally new way #churchofrockandroll #begrateful #miracleshappenhere
A post shared by Stephanie Rachel 🌟 (@4stephanierachel) on Oct 21, 2018 at 5:09pm PDT

Music: Not Impossible explains the idea behind its wearable technology:
“In the near future, vibrotactile art will be an all new means of expression where we can appreciate rhythms, intensities and movements conveyed to the human’s largest organ: The skin. Other interpreters have also made headlines in recent years, including one for Eminem…

 
…and, several years ago, a woman who signed during a Pearl Jam concert, only to dance with Eddie Vedder at the end of “Given to Fly.” How can concerts be made more accessible for hearing-impaired fans?

Wu-Tang Clan…lipstick?

(Via NY Post) Perhaps Wu-Tang Clan has been studying the KISS model. Why not? Look, with CD sales not what they once were, it’s important to find alternate streams of revenue. Lipstick? The kings of this is KISS with more than 7,000 licensed products. Makeup?
Wu-Tang Clan…lipstick?

Yodel Boy has a Christmas album. You’re surprised?

Yodel Boy has a Christmas album. You’re surprised?
A Christmas song, of course. Please make it stop.   Long story short, he ended up performing at Coachella. Next step? Mason Ramsey became a sensation earlier this year when he was discovered giving impromptu yodeling performances in a Walmart. Remember Yodel Boy?

Research asks: Why do people like heavy metal?

Research asks: Why do people like heavy metal?
“Over the years, numerous studies have proven this thinking to be flawed.”
However, as is true of all good things, new research is questioning whether there’s some validity to this assumption. “Fretting parents assumed that if you listened to music with aggressively violent lyrics, you would inevitably act aggressively violent,” the AV Club reports. “Heavy metal fans like to feel like non-conformists, and if the brutal lyrics and pounding blast beats keep mainstream music fans at a distance, so much the better.”
Put another way: “The ubiquitous stereotype of death metal fans — fans of music that contains violent themes and explicitly violent lyrics — (is) that they are angry people with violent tendencies… What we are finding is that that they are not angry people. This underscores that there’s a sharp divide between those who like to throw up the devil horns and head bang and those who’d rather listen to something a little calmer, nicer and less aggressive. Psychologist William Forde Thompson has a new report, published in Scientific American,  that found that among 48 metal-heads and 97 non-fans, “fans of death metal reported experiencing feelings of ‘empowerment, joy, peace and transcendence’ while listening to the music rather than the expected feelings of anger or tension” that some believed was rooted in loud, aggressive music. “While Thompson is willing to admit that a study that relies on self-reporting is far from conclusive, he does think this sharp divide between fans and non-fans is part of the appeal of death metal,” the article says. People who didn’t enjoy or welcome the loud music were more inclined to feel angry or uneasy, including at least one person who described the music as “ sounding like ‘messed-up teenagers making throaty, irritating noises about how bad their lives are,’” the study said. It’s the age-old question: Why do people love heavy metal? They’re not enjoying anger when they listen to the music, but they are in fact experiencing a range of positive emotions.” In particular, psychologists are trying to determine why people like death metal, that deep, aggressive, angular, loud, sharp music that would burn and burst the ear drums of others.

Poll: Deciding Jack White’s Greatest Hits

Poll: Deciding Jack White’s Greatest Hits
Let’s come up with a kick-ass tracklist he’d be proud to press into vinyl at Third Man Records! I consider him the most important rock artist of the past 20 years, although that is not what’s up for debate here. Just a quick note that this is not Alan’s email it’s mine, the guy who’s surname is the last lyric in The White Stripes’ “Lafayette Blues”. I want to know what the readers of A Journal of Musical Things think are Jack’s all-time finest songs, whether they’re Billboard chart-toppers (i.e., “Seven Nation Army”, “Icky Thump”), or obscurities from when he was an upholsterer such as “Apple of My Eye”. There’s no better time to rectify this situation than with Jack currently on a 10-city tour of Canada before wrapping up the 9-months long Boarding House Reach gestation period. This doesn’t include his countless collaborations, from Quantum of Solace movie theme “Another Way to Die” (with Alicia Keys) to being name-dropped on A Tribe Called Quest’s We Got It from Here… Thank You 4 Your Service. Jack While live photo by David James Swanson

Anyone who’s ever perused my author page on this website can quickly figure out that I’m a Jack White fan. Help choose the very best from Jack White’s 20+ year music career – Rock, blues, folk, country…he has done it all and then some! No one, aside from maybe Ty Segall has been more productive – White has fourteen high-profile albums to his name as a member of The White Stripes (6), The Raconteurs (2, with another coming next year), The Dead Weather (3), plus a trifecta under his own name. While it is anything but the ultimate barometer of success, I’ve always been surprised there hasn’t already been some kind of greatest hits compilation issued for him yet. I mean, The Best of The Vines came out way back in 2008, and they were the fourth best of the “The” bands! This isn’t like the US midterms; vote as often as you’d like by commenting on this very post, through Alan Cross’ Facebook, Twitter, or by emailing rockthusiast@gmail.com directly.