Random music news for Tuesday, October 30, 2018

Spotify stock is really suffering. Donald Trump is not going to like this new song from Tim Heidecker called “Ballad of Incel Man.”
Now it’s Bon Jovi vs. Maybe. Is the next iPhone going to have a third camera? The concert industry will be worth at least $31 billion USD by 2022. Remember those AC/DC coins issued by The Royal Australian Mint? They’re now selling for big dollars on eBay. Wow. Still smart speakers. And this new smart speaker from Huawei that looks awfully familiar. Weekly Canadian music sales and streams vs. (Via Steve again)
A new BBC app hopes to attract more young listeners. Music news for All Hallow’s Eve Eve: October 30, 2018. (Via Steve)
A street in New York has been named after Steely Dan founder, Walter Becker. If you’re into High-Res Audio (and you should think about it), check out this cool new device. (Via Moe) Of that, $24 billion will be ticket sales. (One more from Steve)
Is Pearl Jam’s Vs album really 25 years old now? Why? Kim Kardashian. The new palm tree sign for the refurbished El Mocambo in Toronto will be hung and lit November 15. The biggest trend in consumer audio? this point last year: Total albums, -21.2%; digital albums, -19.6%; physical albums, -22.1%; CDs, -25.8%; vinyl albums, +28.1%; streams, +48.5% (1.516 billion streams last week). Samsung’s folding phone is almost here. Is DAB radio in Norway being threatened by the US Navy? (The story is Norwegian, but that’s what Google Translate is for.)
A member of the metal band Manowar has been arrested on child porn charges.
Random music news for Tuesday, October 30, 2018

New Music from the Inbox for October 30, 2018: Vattica, Absolutely Not, Kings of Spade, & More!

One half of the pair, Mia, grew up in Sweden, while the other half, Mark, grew up in Australia. The band is currently touring North America and will tour Europe and the UK in the new year. Watch:

Artist: Good Charlotte
Song: “Self Help”
Album: Single

From their latest album, Good Charlotte’s latest single tackles the perseverance required to overcome mental health issues such as self-doubt, depression, and personal frustration, among others. Listen here. Artist: Vattica
Song: “Criminal”
Album: Single

Hollywood-based alt rock band Vattica recently released this single as a direct criticism about the current turmoil in American politics. Listen:

Artist: Kings of Spade
Song: “Strange Bird”
Album: Single

Hawaiian band Kings of Spade has a distinctive, whisky-soaked southern sound. They shift from pop to show tunes to punk. Listen:

Artist: Mr. Since the release of their first single earlier this year, the band has gathered quite a following. Watch:

Artist: Me&Mark
Song: “Drama Queen”
Album: Single

This duo has a unique sound that blends pop and folk. The song was originally a lo-fi track with a limited release on cassette, but as a popular song during their live sets, the band decided to rerecord it. Watch:

Artist: Absolutely Not
Song: “Medicine Man”
Album: Single

The first release from Chicago’s Absolutely Not since the album that they released last year is a fun glam punk song. This track is the lead singer’s self-described “big queer anthem” about being true to oneself. Goshness
Song: “The Big Ego”
Album: Single

A dynamic band based on Vancouver Island, it’s difficult to fit them into one specific genre.
New Music from the Inbox for October 30, 2018: Vattica, Absolutely Not, Kings of Spade, & More!

Slipknot + The Wiggles = This

Slipknot + The Wiggles = This
Wow. Witness this mashup of Slipknot’s “Psychosocial” and “Fruit Salad” from The Wiggles. Strange things wash up on the shores of the Internet.

Let’s unbox the upcoming Lowest of the Low box set

Let’s unbox the upcoming Lowest of the Low box set
Lowest of the Low remains one of the most fondly-remembered Canadian indie bands of the 90s. Here’s everything you need to know about Shakespeare My…Box.   The good news is that they’re ready to release a fantastic box set featuring everything the band is ever done. Here’s the official trailer. They’re still with us, too, albeit on an occasional basis. Back in September, I helped them unbox one of the first editions that came off the production line.

One of the great weird albums of all time is getting a re-release

The result was a cult sensation. There are stories that link the inspiration of the movie School of Rock to this record. Excerpts from the CD made it onto the soundtracks for several movies and TV shows. Total cost was around $40. And David Bowie himself was entranced by this recording. Read more here. Now it looks like the record is going to get a re-release. The record might have disappeared forever had it not be found in a thrift shop in 2000 Victoria, BC, by a record collector named Brian Hinds. Fans of outsider music know that one of the great examples of the genre is the 1978 release by a bunch of kids from a school in Langley, BC. The recordings were made the school gym in 1976 and 1977 on a two-track tape deck, all in one take each. He engineered a CD re-release through Irwin Chusid, outsider music’s foremost producer. Once complete, the recordings were issued as two LPs for students, teachers and parents, numbering about 200 copies. The Langley Schools Music Project’s Innocence & Despair features a 60-voice children’s choir singing a strange assortment of songs in a haunting, mysterious sort of way.
One of the great weird albums of all time is getting a re-release

Gearing up for Halloween with the stories behind 9 spooky hits

Blue Öyster Cult – (Don’t Fear) The Reaper
Opening with spooky guitar riffs before exploding with clunky drum beats and ringing cowbells, ‘(Don’t Fear) The Reaper’ became Blue Öyster Cult’s biggest hit when it was released on their fourth studio album in 1976. Written and sung by lead guitarist Donald “Buck Dharma” Roeser, the song is about love in the afterlife. A site called MusicNGear has come up with this article that looks at the stories behind nine spooky Halloween (or at least Halloween-ish) songs, including material from David Bowie and Kate Bush. More specifically, it’s about Roeser’s hope that he’d still be with his wife when they had both died. Whilst associated since for its spooky connotations and perhaps vampiric romance, the origins of the classic rock song are far from haunting. Keep reading! You might want to take a look. The witching season is almost upon us and besides the autumnal weather, pumpkin carvings, and trick or treating, it’s also a great time to haunt the dancefloor with our favourite spooky sounds. In fact, the song is about love in the afterlife. We’ve taken on the role of music gravedigger and digged out the back stories of some of our favourite terrifying tunes from David Bowie to Michael Jackson. We all know the opening riffs of ‘Ghostbusters’, the finger clicks of ‘The Addams’ Family’ theme tune and all the words to ‘This Is Halloween’, but how much do we actually know about some of our favourite Halloween tracks and how they came to be welcomed on our annual petrifying playlists?
Gearing up for Halloween with the stories behind 9 spooky hits

Is it time to re-evaluate U2’s Pop album and PopMart tour? Maybe.

Under the fluorescent lights of the near-deserted terminal, he looked like a neon ornament brought to life. Behind the sunglasses Bono could barely keep his eyes open as he filled in the immigration form. Twenty-one years on, it seems ludicrous that U2’s position as one of rock’s heavyweights could ever have been under threat. Okay, so maybe the Rattle and Hum film fell a little flat and the Zooropa album was…okay, but for the most part, U2’s trajectory brought them almost nothing but fame and acclaim. Over the years, though, opinions on the album have softened. Now comes this article in The Irish Times. Seven weeks into their most ambitious – and expensive – tour to date, the frontman dressed as a boxer was feeling punch-drunk from defending U2’s title as the biggest band in the world. Keep reading. But he was nonetheless exhausted – physically and emotionally too. U2’s imperial phase–that period of their career where they could do nothing wrong–extended from the release of The Joshua Tree in March 1987 through to the end of the touring cycle for Achtung Baby. The second sported a goatee and was dressed head-to-toe in a white cowboy outfit studded with rhinestone and topped with a vast stetson hat. Reviews were not good. One wore a silk boxer’s dressing gown with the hood up, his eyes concealed behind mirror shades. True, in places such as Edmonton – provincial, happy to be on the international touring circuit – the greeting afforded the PopMart tour had been as full-hearted as U2 had come to expect. How different it all was in 1997 as, in service of opinion-splitting new album Pop, they struggled against some of the most sustained setbacks of their career. Bono and The Edge had come straight from the stage at the city’s Commonwealth Stadium and were hastening towards a flight to San Francisco. Under pressure to come up with an album that could meet or exceed the standards of The Joshua Tree and Achtung Baby, the band decided to immerse themselves in the emerging world of electronica.   They roll into Dublin’s 3Arena on November 5th for four nights, part of a blockbusting global trek which has to date grossed $106 million. There were many dead ends and false starts and the resulting album, Pop, felt…unfinished. Later, Bono was heard to say that he’d like to go back and work on the album until the band got it right. In 2017, the 20th anniversary of the album’s release, Rolling Stone had this re-imagining of Pop. The two Edmonton gigs had gone well – certainly better than an instantly notorious concert two months earlier at which U2 had stopped midway through a new song in order to work out to play it. (Full disclosure: I’m quoted here.)
A little after midnight on June 16th, 1997, two Irishmen walked into the US immigration pre-clearance facility at Edmonton International Airport in Canada. By late 1995, though, U2 had run into a roadblock. Billboard did the same.
Is it time to re-evaluate U2’s Pop album and PopMart tour? Maybe.

Random music news for Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Feyonce: A settlement has been reached. The story of The Buggles’ “Video Killed the Radio Star.”
Boy, there’s a lot of bad blood around the release of the new Freddie Mercury biopic, Bohemian Rhapsody. Meanwhile, “Bohemian Rhapsody is a bad movie. PLEASE don’t take celebrities advice on vaccines. Pharrell Williams vs. Pop stars growing old gracefully, Or not. And here come the Prince documentaries. Here are seven new books about women in music. Ponder that as we go through music news for October 31, 2018. Looking for something to read this fall? (Via Tom)
Selena Gomez is no longer the most-followed person on Instagram. Aretha Franklin’s closet is going up for auction. Donald Trump: CUT IT OUT! Here are reports on Apple’s new iPads and Macs. PLEASE. This metal musician had his nose bitten off by a dog. Is Spotify spying on us? Radio dude denies offering a woman money to make false claims against Robert Mueller. What’s wrong with this picture? Waze, the navigation app, has gone even deeper when it comes to integrating music into its functions. Carole King has rewritten a song from 1977 to reflect her opinions about the 2018 US midterm elections. And then there’s this from the world of amputations. Lest we forget, HMV is still doing well in some parts of the planet. It’s the night disguised extortionist appear at my door demanding empty calories while their families look on in approval. SLAYER fans don’t like politics. Adele made £15 million this year without working a single day. But boy, is it entertaining.” Read that review here. Beyonce vs. The film opens Friday.
Random music news for Wednesday, October 31, 2018

More Music From The Inbox 31 Oct 2018 Cake, Shotty Horroh, Roddy Colmer and More!

More Music From The Inbox 31 Oct 2018 Cake, Shotty Horroh, Roddy Colmer and More!
Sounds like:  how the world feels
Link/Listen/Watch:

Artist: Shotty Horroh, “Frank & Stein”
Album: Salt of the Earth

Manchester based with a serious following
Sounds like:  a storyteller, telling
Link/Listen/Watch:

Artist: Roddy Colmer, “Burn Love”
Album: N/A

A good Toronto boy!  All proceeds to Doctors Without Borders! Artist: Cake, “Sinking Ship”  
Album: N/A

First new music since 2011!  Worth your time! Sounds like:  a definite Big Wreck feel
Link/Listen/Watch:

Artist: Azure Ray, “Last Summer In Omaha”
Album: Waves

Out of Georgia with a distinct sound
Sounds like:  beauty in the depths
Link/Listen/Watch:

Artist: Season of Ghosts, “A Leap of Faith”  
Album: A Leap of Faith

Impressive stuff from this Uk/Japan artist
Sounds like:  something we all need to do in life
Link/Listen/Watch:

Artist: The Francos, “Back To Basics”
Album: N/A

Loving the retro feel of this Australian outfit
Sounds like:  simplicity in the complex
Link/Listen/Watch:

Gaze upon these photos from Nick Cave’s show in Toronto.

That’s what staff photographer Andrei Chlychkov captured at the Scotiabank Arena in Toronto on October 28. Some were a bit concerned that the cavernous Scotiabank Arena might not be the right venue for Nick, but all their doubts were proven wrong in a matter of seconds Nick and Co. The middle bit featured Cave sitting behind the grand piano playing songs like “Into My Arms”, and “God is in the House.”
The last part had marvels such as “The Weeping Song” with Cave walking in the middle of the song to a smaller stage in the middle of the audience and encouraging them to clap the song’s beat. Another tune to remember for was “Stagger Lee”, which had Nick Cave at the height of his performing power, Warren Eliss’ Fender Jaguar deafening roar and many members of the audience on the stage. The setlist had something like three movements to it: a violent beginning and ending, surrounding a gentler middle part. Onstage, he jumped around, kicking the stands and throwing the microphones here and there, possibly to the great panic of the sound guys. (The sound in the area as excellent, by the way.)

The Bad Seeds lived up to their properly nasty rock ‘n’ roll name by bringing the sounds of heaven and hell, angels and demons into the earthly arena. totally owned the stage. The band, who exchanged their instruments with each other after every couple of songs or so, were lead by maestro Warren Ellis, He acted like a conductor orchestrating the whole extravaganza. It was followed shortly by “Red Right Hand” with the blood red lights soaking the whole place, which Cave dedicated to Brazil, lamenting a “terrible day” for that country and proving his political consciousness. The highlights of the first part included an explosive rendition of “From Her to Eternity” especially cherished by those who remembered the song from the Berlin underground scenes of Wim Wenders’ film cinema Wings of Desire. Period. If you haven’t heard Nick Cave bending and screaming at you to hear his heart “BOOM BOOM BOOM”, you probably haven’t experienced real live music yet. One of them was the genuine interaction with the audience, mostly by the super charismatic frontman in the black suit, Cave himself, stepped down into the crowd on a couple of occasions, holding conversations with individual folks and improvising lines. (Here’s the setlist.) Text by Khashayar Bavarsad. Cave had several winning cards in their hands. A Nick Cave show in the lead-up to Halloween? He and the Bad Seeds are the very definitions of live music. For those who were looking for an intellectual and sophisticated take on Halloween season’s macabre scenarios, no other gig could come even close to Nick Cave and the other-worldly The Bad Seeds singing ballads of murder, mystery, and painful romance.
Gaze upon these photos from Nick Cave’s show in Toronto.

Drummer Martin Atkins offers tips for music business success from a punk rock point of view

The man has a few things to offer. Watch this.   Martin Atkins has been the drummer for Public Image Ltd., Ministry, Pigface, and Nine Inch Nails. He’s also a record label owner and music industry entrepreneur.
Drummer Martin Atkins offers tips for music business success from a punk rock point of view

Here is our favourite crop of new artists from ReverbNation

2. 1. Submissions flooded in, reaching a total of nearly 2,200 before the deadline passed. Tripzville Gods (Auckland, New Zealand)

Tripzville Godz are a musical collective whose story beings in Belfast, Northern Ireland, and continues now in Auckland, New Zealand. They say “We want to play our own little part in the current worldwide awakening process using music as our communication tool.” Extraterra (LP) by Vaureen
4. Vaureen (New York City)

Vaureen is an alternative/shoegaze trio based in New York City. Listen to more here. The Eiffels (Los Angeles)

Relix Magazine calls The Eiffels‘ “sleek dance rock…contagious.” Paste Magazine calls them “a sweet spot between indie-pop and rock.” Listen to more here. Their first full-length album Extraterra was released on October 26, 2018, on Rising Pulse Records. Earlier this fall, A Journal of Musical Things partnered with ReverbNation to highlight some of the best bands on the site.  
3. After going through all of them (as you might guess, that took a little time), these four bands have been chosen for a little extra love. Inkblot Astronaut (Portland, Oregon)

Inkblot Astronaut is an Oregon based rock band hopping and blending genres to carve their own sound.
Here is our favourite crop of new artists from ReverbNation

Trump used ‘Happy’ at rally hours after 11 people were killed

Seeking to avoid embarrassing controversy, most politicians stop using music when an artist asks them to, even if they feel legally entitled.”
It’s possible that Pharrell and his team have a stronger case to pursue against Trump than other artists who have either sent cease-and-desist letters or filed a claim against politicians in the past, FMC says. On Saturday morning, 11 people in three congregations were participating in services at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh. Of course, other politicians have used musicians’ work without their permission before, usually during campaign events. His attorney Howard King writes in a cease-and-desist letter to Trump: “On the day of the mass murder of 11 human beings at the hands of a deranged ‘nationalist,’ you played (Pharrell’s) song ‘Happy’ to a crowd at a political event in Indiana. Mike Bost, up for re-election next week in the hotly contested and closely watched midterm elections. There was nothing ‘happy’ about the tragedy inflicted upon our country on Saturday and no permission was granted for your use of this song for this purpose.”
Further, King writes that Pharrell did not, has not and will not give Trump permission to use the song or to any other piece of his music and states that this particular use of “Happy” is both copyright and trademark infringement. (He could just use Ted Nugent or Kid Rock songs, as both are notable pals of his and were on hand for the signing of the Music Modernization Act a few weeks ago.)
Trump used the song at a rally in support of Rep. Trump alone received letters or angry statements from Steven Tyler, Prince’s estate, REM, Queen and others for using their music during his events. As noted by the Future of Music Coalition, the Trump team could shrug their shoulders and say the use of a song at a rally constitutes fair use. Pharrell is not having it. The man responsible, Robert Bowers, had a social media profile filled with anti-Semitic statements and vitriol, accounts which have since been removed by their respective platforms. And yet, that’s what Donald Trump did Saturday in Indiana. There’s tone deaf, and then there’s playing “Happy” at a campaign rally hours after 11 people were killed while praying. In addition to legal considerations, there are ethical issues to examine. “Such a use would require a license. “It’s very unlikely that simply using a song to soundtrack a rally would quality as fair use,” FMC says.
Trump used ‘Happy’ at rally hours after 11 people were killed