Random music news for Saturday, September 8, 2018

Still in Vancouver at the Skookum Festival. This. What? Wait: Bach is the property of Sony? For no particular reason, here’s a story about Liam Gallagher’s daughter. Here’s a history of the search engine that ate the world. Kim Kardashian says there is no sex tape sample in Kanye’s music. Mick Jagger is getting back into acting with The Burnt Orange Heresy. Bass lessons with that guitar? And now, some music news for Saturday, September 8, 2018. But is that a good thing? Google turned 20 this week. What’s that? Check out these sketches. (Hint: If you’re a parent, you should read this.)
Influencer fraud? What’s that? (Via Tom one more time)
Here’s the latest missive from Tom DeLonge’s To the Stars Academy. This is an interesting look at how pop stars are guiding their own narratives. Kindie rock? Yes, please. (Blame Tom)
This is fascinating: The head of CBS allegedly tried to sabotage Janet Jackson’s career after the Super Bowl wardrobe malfunction. Here are seven mixing terms you may need to know. Cool: The story behind the creation of the iPhone keyboard. Here’s an unreleased outtake from Prince’s Purple Rain sessions entitled “17 Days.”
Let’s go back to when David Bowie was just 16. Having a good time. If you’re a fan of Led Zeppelin, you might want to listen to this online special. Because it’s Caturday, here are 15 songs about cats. Wish you were here.
Random music news for Saturday, September 8, 2018

This guy had never heard “Bohemian Rhapsody” before. Let’s watch his reaction.

As hard as it is to believe, there are people on the planet who have never heard Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” before. He recently sat down in front of a camera and had the song played to him for the first time. But YouTuber Joey Reacts claims to be one of them. I know, I know. Here’s his reaction. Craziness, right?
This guy had never heard “Bohemian Rhapsody” before. Let’s watch his reaction.

How AI is changing the world of music

It’s a crazy world we live in now.”
It’s a crazy world, indeed. … What the hell is going on here?’” recalls Jason Flom, CEO of Lava Records, to Canadian Musician. I saw that when I was at the TED Conference. I don’t know, but … it’s probably a net positive if it helps with research. In fact, it’s here already. So, let’s look at how AI is impacting the two poles of the music business: the music and the business. AI is coming for music. -AC]
Artificial intelligence is here, it’s everywhere, and it’s radically changing our daily lives, from internet searches to banking, shopping, commuting, and even the temperature in our homes. I’m sure there will be some nefarious consequences as well, but I don’t know what those would be. I was like, ‘Oh my god, this is insane; it literally wrote the damn symphony! [Mike Raine wrote this for Canadian Musician magazine. “Maybe it’s a good thing, maybe it’s a bad thing. And as all tech does, AI is evolving at such a radical pace that, frankly, we can only speculate about its long-term impacts. In the music world, AI is fundamentally changing not just how we listen to music, but how music is made and even how the music industry operates. “Didn’t AI just write a symphony? Keep reading. If it helps identify artists who otherwise wouldn’t get discovered, then ironically, AI would be being utilized, in a certain way, to expose non-AI creativity.
How AI is changing the world of music

Plot twist: Showbox owner sues Seattle

Plot twist: Showbox owner sues Seattle
“The city’s action is fundamentally inconsistent with the property’s location and deteriorated state, inconsistent with the development of the Pike Place Market in the 1970s and inconsistent with the rights of the property owner,” the lawsuit says. “Populism, and politicans’ desires to appease their loudest constituents and generate headlines must, however, yield to the rule of law,” the lawsuit says. “The value is determined by who’s willing to pay for it.”
The station mentioned a similar case, in 2002, of some modified garages that were built in the 1920s but later renovated into a recording studio where Nirvana, Pearl Jam and Alice and Chains had sessions. Artists at the heart of the city’s still-vibrant music scene rose up and demanded something be done to save the venue, one of the important places in the history of grunge and other genres of music that have been grown and nurtured in the Pacific Northwest over the past 30 years. It adds that the Showbox has been passed over for landmark status previously, several times, and that the property has been “upzoned twice since 2006, including last year when the area’s maximum building height was increased from 40 stories to 44.”
And in a rather staggering comment, the lawsuit compares the “save the Showbox” cries to those used by the Trump campaign and administration – whose supporters regularly shout “lock her up,” “build the wall” and other awful things during his ongoing rallies. Those buildings are set to be demolished and replaced with another apartment tower. The Seattle Times reports an LLC controlled by Forbes filed suit last week, arguing that the city “failed to follow procedural requirements” when it passed the historic protection expansion ordinance. “Aesthetically or historically it’s really not important, so we get into a value argument,” said KIRO host John Curley. (WOW.)
In the meantime, a radio station in Seattle is wading into the debate, saying that just because the building is nostalgic and beloved doesn’t mean is should be saved. But now the building’s owner, Roger Forbes, is suing Seattle. There’s been a lot of talk about the Showbox in Seattle this summer, as a Vancouver-based developer announced its intent to knock the building down and put up a 40-floor apartment complex. It also claims the rezoning is a “discriminatory spot zone.”
The protection awarded to the Showbox property is only good for 10 months, however; the council approved it to provide some time to determine whether the theater should receive historic landmark status – something activists are already working to secure. The city council passed a temporary order, extending the historic preservation zone that encompasses Pike Place Market to extend to its neighbour across the street.

Are you paying attention to the NAFTA talks? As a music fan, you should be–and here’s why

As a music fan, you should be–and here’s why Are you paying attention to the NAFTA talks?
Would you want your ISP controlled by an American entity? I know it’s easy to be distracted by a million other things in today’s world, but we as music fans need to keep a close eye on the cultural issues being discussed in the NAFTA talks. He really does seem to have a personal thing against Justin Trudeau in his I-win-you-lose approach to trade. It’ll help you get up to speed on the issues. And the idea of an import tax on autos is one of the dumbest things industry people on both sides of the border have ever seen. Maybe. Imagine if American networks came up here and bought Canadian radio and TV stations. I think not. How about removing all the tax advantages and subsidies that make Canadian productions (TV, movie, music) viable
Could something like FACTOR and Starmaker be jeopardized? (Hint: The Globe and Mail says 650,000 people work in these industries..)
Foreign ownership rules for media companies and telecoms. You may have never given this a thought before, but we have built walls to prevent Canada from becoming a Kardashian nation. What would happen to Francophone culture in Quebec and other provinces? Do we want a nation without an independent domestic book and magazine publishing industry? This is not the place to go into the lies and ludicrous misinformation about dairy trade (the US actually has a dairy trade SURPLUS with Canada!) Without Chapter 19 dispute resolution, Canada risked being steamrolled by an economy that’s ten times larger than ours. This includes:

Cancon rules for radio and television.  
  But I do want to draw your attention to something that should be another red line in these negotiations: exemptions for measures that protect Canadian culture. What would happen, say, if Fox bought into CTV? Read this article in the Toronto Star. Everything we consumed would probably be increasingly Americanized. For reasons that no one understands, Donald Trump has it out for Canada when it comes to the NAFTA negotiations. And how many Canadian workers would be thrown out of work? Imagine if there were no more rules regulating the amount of domestic content on radio and TV.

Radio broadcasting returns to One World Trade Center

Radio broadcasting returns to One World Trade Center
The exhibit also includes the camera and notebook of a photographer killed by falling debris and smoke. A massive antennae was on top of the towers, providing service for WPAT, Columbia University’s adult alternative and the New York City Public Radio stations. It’s a fitting time for this announcement: an FM radio translator will be flipped on and signals will start broadcasting from the very top of the World Trade Center, Inside Radio reports. With all the death and destruction caused during the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks in New York City, three radio stations lost their signal. Over the years, they’ve found other homes for their broadcasts, of course, but a New Jersey FM translator has been relocated to the top of the new One World Trade Center in Manhattan, making it the first one in that vicinity in 17 years. “This has been a two-year process to formulate and execute this project to support the first FM broadcaster from atop the tallest building in North America,” Bert Goldman told Inside Radio. As for the original antenna, it was mangled in the attacks and is now on display at the Newseum in Washington, D.C., part of a massive exhibit on the attacks and international coverage of that day. The translator will broadcast a new format station, expected to be found at 104.7 on the dial, within a few weeks. The tower already is home to several television stations.

Here’s an ode to the 25th Amendment of the US Constitution

Here’s an ode to the 25th Amendment of the US Constitution
Something about letting soldiers stay at your place without being hassled. The Fourth has to do with unreasonable search and seizure. The Twenty-Fifth Amendment is being thrown around by people who think that Donald Trump is mentally ill. The Second Amendment is the one gun nuts love. Now let’s skip to the third-last amendment, number 25. The Twenty-Fifth serves as inspiration for this song by Devendra Banhart. Click on the image for a listen. The Third has to do with…er, I don’t know. America is so proud of its constitution it’s impossible to avoid learning anything about it. Let’s see: the First Amendment is all about freedom of expression. The Fifth is what criminals take when they don’t want to incriminate themselves. This is the one that deals the line of presidential succession if the current president is incapacitated or too ill to carry on.

American indie rock by the chart numbers

Where have American indie rock artists placed on the Billboard album charts this century? Click on the image to see everything. Cameron Gordon over at Completely Ignored as a new graphic for us.
American indie rock by the chart numbers

The time The Who’s Keith Moon played a drum solo with a bunch of fish

Here’s Keith’s last-ever TV interview, recorded about a month before he died. He was one of kind. In honour of the anniversary of his death is this drum solo filmed on October 8, 1974, for a show called Wide World in Concert: Midnight Special. Friday (September 7) was the 40th anniversary of the death of The Who’s Keith Moon. Two things to note: (a) The fish inside one of the toms (remember Ludwig’s acrylic kits?): and (b) the dudes dancing to it.
The time The Who’s Keith Moon played a drum solo with a bunch of fish

Rock My World Canada, Chapter 2: Ghandarvas

Rock My World Canada, Chapter 2: Ghandarvas
This is the latest excerpt from his book. The album included the single “The First Day of Spring”, which was named Song of the Year (CASBY Award) by The Edge 102.1 in Toronto and was nominated for MuchMusic’s Video of the Year. In November 1993 they signed with the label Watch Music and in 1994 released their debut album as The Gandharvas, titled A Soap Bubble and Inertia. Find out more about Gandharvas and hundreds of other Canadian artists in the softcover edition of Canadian Alternative & Indie Reference and Collector’s Guide. The band formed in 1989 as The Droogs (later The London Droogs), and released a self-titled EP in 1991. – AC]
 

The Gandharvas were an alternative rock band formed in 1989 in London, Ontario. [Mike Carr has put together a massive volume on Canadian music history entitled Canadian Alternative & Indie Reference and Collector’s Guide. Get your copy here. It’s an incredible discography of hundreds of bands. They changed their name to The Gandharvas in 1993, after Gandharvas, who are musical spirits in Hinduism. Follow on Facebook and Twitter, too.

Check Out Motion Exposure at Lumen Art Festival!

Check Out Motion Exposure at Lumen Art Festival!
The free event runs from 6-11pm in the uptown area of the city, allowing people to explore five different zones. Combining equal parts art, light, and technology, a long exposure photo captures the paths of LEDs to tell the story of movement. One booth you definitely won’t want to miss out on, though, is Stephen Orlando’s “Motion Exposure”. Visitors can watch others play violin or drums and see the photographic results projected onto screens. To learn more about the Lumen Art Festival, you can check out the city of Waterloo website here. If you’re in the Waterloo area on Saturday September 29 — or are looking for something to do and don’t mind driving out to Waterloo — you can check out the Lumen Art Festival. There are several music-related booths to check out, as well as a stage to see live performances. Additionally, they will receive a low resolution version of the image as a souvenir. Check out his website to see some amazing photos. The results of Orlando’s photography is spectacular.