Random music news for Monday, July 30, 2018

Random music news for Monday, July 30, 2018
Like Led Zeppelin? There has been an injury in Greta Van Fleet which has caused some postponements. No, really. It wasn’t that hot. Never thought of this: Why is the devil always portrayed as playing a fiddle? Read about the generational divide in hip-hop. Rick Astley’s new (temporary) drummer is 83 years old. Moby is selling this house. Looks like the iPad Pro is about to lose the 3.5mm headphone jack. Let’s take a look. Back on this day in 1966, England won the World Cup over Germany in extra time. Then here’s a book to put on it. Pussy Riot is working to free a girl who’s accused of an anti-Putin plot. Got a coffee table? What’s the future for the music video? And it’s Mary Berry from The Great British Bake-Off. (Via Tom)
Is this the best video of the 21st century? Rock and pop aren’t the only genres where older people don’t understand what the young are listening to. So why did Elton John’s bodyguards carry him across the sand when he went to the beach? As for music news on July 30, 2018…

Here are the ways tech is changing live music. Netflix has ordered a series based on the murder of a club DJ. Yes, in Minneapolis. It’s really nice. The church of headbangers? Here’s some fun computer analysis of Beatles’ songwriting,
Lance Bass and Miley Cyrus are hoping to go in together on buying the Brady Bunch house. These earbuds work and sound just like a home theatre system set-up.

New Music from the Inbox for July 30, 2018: IDLES, Jukebox the Ghost, Young the Giant, & More!

Watch:

Artist: Young the Giant
Song: “Simplify”
Album: Single

The band’s first new music since 2016, Young the Giant’s “Simplify” is about the complexity of modern life. Watch:

Artist: Picturesque
Song: “Dead Flowers”
Album: Single

Getting ready to head out on tour in September, Picturesque recently released their first new music since their debut full-length album in 2017. The song is about the stress, the anxiety, and the precarity that gentrification causes. Watch:

Artist: Nick Ferrio
Song: “I Don’t Know How Long”
Album: Single

Nick Ferrio doesn’t often write political songs, but with his latest track, he says that “the idea that the personal is political became really apparent”. “Dead Flowers” took three months to record. Watch:

Artist: Kagoule
Song: “Egg Hunt”
Album: Single

The lead single from their album set for release this October, Kagoule’s “Egg Hunt” acts as a grand comeback for the band. The Nottingham trio also plans on touring the UK this fall. Watch: This song comes from their latest album Off to the Races, released earlier this year. The accompanying video adds to the theme. https://youtu.be/-nOCuOoE6SEArtist: IDLES
Song: “Samaritans”
Album: Single

From their upcoming LP, IDLES describes their latest track as “one of their most confrontational songs to date”. The single is a searing takedown of toxic masculinity
Watch:

Artist: Jukebox the Ghost
Song: “Everybody’s Lonely”
Album: Single

Brooklyn piano-pop band Jukebox the Ghost are getting ready to head out on tour this fall.
New Music from the Inbox for July 30, 2018: IDLES, Jukebox the Ghost, Young the Giant, & More!

Where are musicians making money? On the road.

On the road. Where are musicians making money?
When they played Shea Stadium on Aug. [This was my weekly column for Global News. A typical show would bring in $750,000 (the equivalent of $3.1 million today), a huge number. Ten dollars seems cheap, but that was the equivalent to around $40 in 2018. Note the price. Consider, too, that manager Peter Grant had extracted a 90-10 split between the band and promoters. It was a nice payday but paled in comparison when it came to revenue from record sales. Keep reading. A typical show would bring in $750,000 (the equivalent of $3.1 million today), a huge number. Consider, too, that manager Peter Grant had extracted a 90-10 split between the band and promoters. Here’s a Led Zeppelin ticket stub from a show in Seattle on July 17, 1977. Ten dollars seems cheap, but that was the equivalent to around $40 in 2018. – AC]
We can credit The Beatles as being the first stadium band. Selling at a clip of 72,000 tickets a day, that 1977 tour was a record-breaker in terms of box office grosses. Here’s me discussing everything on Global News Radio AM 640 Monday morning. 15, 1965, no other act had played in front of so many people (55,000) and raked in so much money ($304,000 or about $2.4 million in 2018 dollars; all dollar figures in this piece are U.S.) in ticket sales for a single gig. Selling at a clip of 72,000 tickets a day, that 1977 tour was a record-breaker in terms of box office grosses.

Ex-blink-182 man continues his research into UFOs and secret transformative technology

Ex-blink-182 man continues his research into UFOs and secret transformative technology
If the truth is out there, Tom will be the guy to find it. We are overwhelmed by the reception our world-class team has received since the launch of the company and are confident in our ability to be among the leading research teams focused on trying to answer some of the biggest questions of our lifetime. An announcement of a new initiative was made the other day. Read more here. And it’s not just Tom in his basement, posting screeds for an audience of like-minded conspiratorial nutbars. No, this is a very, serious organization with a very serious staff. Investors and Friends,
Today we announce the launch of our flagship research program, The ADAM Research Project, and our partnership with EarthTech International (www.earthtech.org), a pioneering research organization in Austin, Texas, at the forefront of next-generation science and technology. If we ever gain mainstream access to zero-point energy, our species should be better off. Since he left blink-182, Tom DeLonge has gone deep–and I mean really deep–into UFO research (something that he calls “The Phenomenon”) and captured/transferred technology that could change everything for humanity. Tom’s R&D/whistle-blowing organization is called To the Stars Academy. Project ADAM, an acronym for Acquisition & Data Analysis of Materials, will focus on the collection and scientific evaluation of material samples obtained through reliable reports of advanced aerospace vehicles of unknown origin.

Is the oldest record 10,000 years old? Maybe?

Is the oldest record 10,000 years old? Maybe?
And it gets better. All have a large centre hole. In fact, there’s probably a very good explanation for what these things actually are. This, in turn, did not work out so well for Tsum Um Nui. Naturally, a whole mythology has grown up around these things. These beings were known as The Dropa. He died sometime in the early 60s. Vyatcheslav Saizev came up with the idea of placing the discs on a special turntable which passed an electric charge through them. That forced them to adapt to live on a very primitive earth. The Dropa Stones, as they were called for reasons we’ll see in a second, were examined by a Chinese researcher named Tsun Um Nui who allegedly translated the strange markings. Look familiar? Go here to have the aura destroyed. This didn’t work out so well because the ETs were hunted down and wiped out by the local Han Chinese. Still, it’s kinda cool. No? Finding that they were composed of an unusual amount of cobalt, Dr. but many had a spiral groove contained these never-before-seen hieroglyphics. Meanwhile, several Dropa Stones were sent to Moscow for examination. He claims that they vibrated and hum with a strange rhythm. While rooting through some caves in China back in 1938, archaeologist Dr. Not only do they look something like a modern day 7-inch single. The beings survived but weren’t able to repair their craft. Chi Pu Tei found something very strange: hundreds of disks made of stone, some 6 inches diameter, others up to nine inches. In 1962, he revealed his conclusions to the world:  The stones told the story of spaceships that crash-landed into the Bayan Har Mountains.  
 
 
  He was subject to a lot of ridicule, forcing him into exile in Japan. To add even more mystery, some suggest that Tsum Um Nui never existed. A book called Sungods in Exile, which purported to blow the lid on the whole thing, turned out to be a hoax when the author admitted to pulling everyone’s chain.

K-pop star has something to say about the Trump-Kim summit with this video

Note the similarities with Psy’s “Gangnam Style.”

BONUS: Try this Japanese band called World Order and their song “Let’s Start WW3.” Big Bang is a big deal in the world of K-pop. One of its members, Seungri, has released a new video under his real name, Lee Seung-hyun. He has a new take on the Donald Trump/Kim Jong-un summit that took place in Singapore back in June.
K-pop star has something to say about the Trump-Kim summit with this video

Hey, idiots! Stop jumping out of moving cars while dancing to Drake.

Stop jumping out of moving cars while dancing to Drake. Hey, idiots!
It’s called the “Kiki challenge” (sometimes spelled “Keke”) or, in some places, the “In My Feelings Challenge.” It works like this: as Drake’s “In My Feelings” plays in a moving car, a person jumps out and begins dancing alongside while the car continues down the street. i almost died #Kekechallenge #KIKIDOYOULOVEME pic.twitter.com/ZkEExvN9ep
— Barbara Kopylova (@baabsxx) July 15, 2018

Police in Mumbai, India, aren’t impressed with this. #DanceYourWayToSafety #InMySafetyFeelingsChallenge pic.twitter.com/gY2txdcxWZ
— Mumbai Police (@MumbaiPolice) July 26, 2018

I confess that I did laugh at this. Stop doing this. pic.twitter.com/4rUdb72tnf
— Dogs But Also Dogs (@DogsButAlsoDogs) July 29, 2018

Seriously, though, people. We gon get a million views with this. “Bruh, I’m a do the keke challenge and you gon run me over with your car. Look at this 😂😂😂 #KekeChallenge pic.twitter.com/sqNNbvnP8B
— 😝 (@itsonlyakram) July 28, 2018

Then there’s this idiot. It’s litt 🔥🔥🔥” pic.twitter.com/AnUwOIBNaE
— Mark!E Young (@YoMarkie) July 29, 2018

Or this dummy. Here’s what can happen.  Stop it. Please, kids. Not just a risk for you but your act can put life of others at risk too. Alright shut it down everybody. Go back to eating Tide Pods or something. Desist from public nuisance or face the music! The #KikiChallenge is over with.

Weekly survey: What’s you’re all time favourite movie soundtrack

For reasons no one has ever been able to explain, Brian DePalma’s schlock-rock masterpiece was embraced by Winnipeggers more than anywhere else on the planet. Weird, I know.  
  They can be very…abnormal. But that’s the world of soundtracks. Since we’re right in the middle of summer blockbuster season, it’s probably a good time for this question: What’s your favourite movie soundtrack of all time? I’m pretty sure that the first album I every got was the original score to Stanely Kubrick’s 1968 classic, 2001: A Space Odyssey. Because I’m from originally Winnipeg, it’s a rule that I have to be into the soundtrack from Phantom of the Paradise. I remember being very disappointed that “Also sprach Zarathustra”–the famous octave-jumping Richard Strauss composition used as the opening theme–was less than two minutes long. When I got to university, my friend Candace introduced me to a weird German punk film called Cha-Cha starring people like Herman Brood, Lena Lovich, and Nena Hagen. So I put it to you: What are your favourite movie soundtracks or scores of all time? The rest of it–save for a lovely rendition of “The Blue Danube Waltz” was–far too weird and esoteric for me.
Weekly survey: What’s you’re all time favourite movie soundtrack

I Like This: The Julian Taylor Band and “Sweeter”

I Like This: The Julian Taylor Band and “Sweeter”
For the life of me, I can’t figure out why this guy isn’t a star. Make sure you pay attention to the lyrics. The latest from the Julian Taylor Band is a great postcard from the road. He’s certainly the hardest-working musician I know–and he’s always super, super positive.

That time 15 years ago today 500,000 came together for a SARS concert

That time 15 years ago today 500,000 came together for a SARS concert
Or, most correctly, “The Rolling Stones SARS Benefit Concert”

An estimated half a million people flooded into Downsview Park on Wednesday, July 30, for a full day of music featuring over a dozen acts that ranged from fresh-faced Sam Roberts to francophones La Chicane, perpetual oddballs The Flaming Lips, Rush with working washing machines on stage for some reason, and who can ever forget Justin Timberlake getting bottled? The Rolling Stones weren’t afraid of contracting a little flu; they wanted to show support for the city that had been so good to them in the past in terms of things like hosting tour rehearsals. And then there’s this. Fifteen years ago, the still-new megacity of Toronto had a lot more to worry about than the premier of Ontario slashing city hall and multiple neo-Nazis running for mayorship. And of course, Keef had a little history with our judicial system. Edgefest for one had to be moved to September and was dubbed “The Last Bash in Barrie” with the Hip, Sloan and Our Lady Peace as American artists were still nervous about Toronto as a whole. Or SARS-a-palooza. OK, there’s also Justin Trudeau’s mom and the El Mocambo, but I digress…with a little help from celebrity friends such as Dan Ackroyd, the Stones organized one of the biggest benefit events the world had ever seen, let alone li’l ol’ Toronto. The acronym stands for severe acute respiratory syndrome in case anyone forgot, a virally-transmitted breathing disease which infected a few hundred people throughout the province but scared the bejesus out of anyone thinking of traveling here, musicians included. AC/DC arguably stole the show with no less than three songs with “Hell” in their titles, plus gratuitous booby shots caught live by the CBC. Or SARSFest. To mark the occasion, please enjoy this “Memories of SARSStock” playlist on Soundsgood, streamable regardless of if you subscribe to Spotify, Apple Music or whatever. We called it SARSStock. Back in the early months of 2003, Canada’s tourist hub was under siege no thanks to SARS.

Random music news for Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Cue the backlash. It was another rough week for physical CD sales in the US. Confused about “analogue” vs. Meanwhile, Troy Carter announced that he’ll be stepping down from his role as Global Head of Creator Services for Spotify in September. There was a big podcasting conference in Philadelphia. The House of Lords in the UK is concerned about how music tours will be adversely affected by Brexit. Concerned about who might be snooping on your browsing? Remember the Dave Matthews Band “poop bus” incident? Vivendi is planning to sell up to half the Universal Music Group. Universal is now generating $50 million a month in streaming revenues. It was possible to reach the #1 position on the Canadian SoundScan charts by selling just 2,300 copies. The reviews are good. Alex Jones’ InfoWars is now on Spotify. Here’s music news for July 31, 2018. (Via Ronald)
There was an attempt to break the record for the greatest number of Beatles impersonators in one place. No? this time last year: Total albums, -17.3%; digital albums, -21.5%; physical albums, -14.5%; CDs, -18.9%; vinyl, -56.2%; streaming, +52.9% with 1.355 billion streams. Is Russell Simmons thinking of moving to Bali to escape the law? Why sell now? Use Chrome? Last day of July already and the back-to-school ads are in full effect. The soundtrack of the new Mamma Mia film is #1 on SoundScan, selling just 33,870 copies. It’s a good time. Try this retro puppy. Tired of your modern computer keyboard? This week’s honour goes to the new Mamma Mia soundtrack. It was possible to make the Top 10 with less than 6,000 copies and the Top 200 by selling only 637 units. Read this. Take a look at this extension. Fantastic. Canadian music sales and streams vs. “digital” masters when it comes to vinyl? Read this.
Random music news for Tuesday, July 31, 2018

It’s been ten years since the 2008 financial crisis. Let’s look back on how music responded.

Let’s look back on how music responded. It’s been ten years since the 2008 financial crisis.
But in many cases, there seem to be no serious problems besides having too many women or possessions to choose from. After the pain of the ’08 crash, the nation experienced an economic recovery that shifted a massive amount of income from the poor and middle class to the very rich. We can call the past 10 years the decade of inequality. And while we’ve largely recovered from that–Hey! Why didn’t anyone go to jail for this?–the scars are still pretty ugly. (The shift in personal style from an old-school rich man like Warren Buffett, who made his early fortune in the 1950s, to Donald Trump, a product of the gilded ’80s, is hard to miss.)
Artists singing about how much wealth they had accrued fit cleanly into a Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous culture. Part of the paradox here is simply that monetary wealth gives musicians — at least, the tiny minority experiencing material bounty — something to sing about. So how did music respond to the economic collapse ten years ago? Read this from Vox. Not so well, really. Musicians are not unique here: In the years since the Reagan administration, a reveling in what used to be called heartless materialism has become de rigueur. Culture is always downstream from society, reflecting and chronicling everything that happens to us. Keep reading. Nor can we imagine Joni Mitchell, Patti Smith, or Liz Phair posing in a bath of diamonds, as Taylor Swift does in the 2017 video for “Look What You Made Me Do.”
Many of the songs about luxurious possessions and lavish lifestyles — the sonic equivalent of Keeping Up With the Kardashians — are the descendants of “Mo Money Mo Problems,” the 1997 Notorious B.I.G. The Beatles, the Rolling Stones, and Marvin Gaye were filthy rich, but it’s hard to imagine them crooning about their money and mansions. The big banks got bigger; huge bonuses returned. It was ten years ago this September that a bunch of Wall Street scumbags pushed the world economy to brink of collapse with their goofy collateralized debt obligations, credit swaps, and derivative trades that no one understood. That includes music. Just two years after the crash, the nation’s Gini coefficient, the standard measure of wealth distribution, was at 46.9, making the US among the most unequal of modern democracies. song. So what, then, does the music of inequality sound like?

The murky, illegal, hard-to-kill world of unauthorized online music sales

Music Mafia first popped up a year ago, stock with music apparently supplied by hackers and people on the inside of the music industry. Naturally, artists, composers, publishers and other owners of the intellectual property get zip. Buying digital music files online usually means a trip to iTunes. There’s Music Mafia, for one, a site that–well, just take a look. More at Hypebot and TorrentFreak. Let’s see how this unfolds.   Clicking around brings up lists of artists (Kanye, Coldplay, Drake, Beyonce and dozens of others) and links to unreleased material (included pre-release songs), and still-to-released music videos, all of which require cryptocurrency for purchase. The RIAA, America’s music industry watchdog, is on the case. But there are sites that will also do business with you, except that they’re not authorized to sell you anything.
The murky, illegal, hard-to-kill world of unauthorized online music sales

Donald Trump covers Metallica. Sort of.

Donald Trump covers Metallica. Sort of.
I may be mistaken, but there may have been a little bit of editing and manipulation at work here as Donald Trump takes on Metallica’s “Fight Fire with Fire.”

Heading to Lollapalooza in Chicago this weekend? Expect a LOT of security.

Heading to Lollapalooza in Chicago this weekend? Expect a LOT of security.
So, yeah, the Lollapalooza security perimeter will extend well beyond the festival grounds. If you’re heading to Lollapalooza this weekend, expect LOTS of extra security and plenty of bag searches. The Chicago Tribune reports:
Lollapalooza, which typically attracts 100,000 music fans each of its four days, will be one of the country’s largest urban festivals held since 64-year-old Stephen Paddock opened fire from his 32nd-floor suite at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino, killing 58 people and wounding hundreds more at the Route 91 Harvest festival on Oct. Days later, the Tribune reported Paddock had months earlier reserved two rooms at the Blackstone Hotel on Michigan Avenue with a clear view of Lollapalooza, but he never showed up during the August festival. 1. Officials have reason to be double-extra-careful. There are no known threats, but organizers want to make sure that there’s no repeat of the Route 91 Festival in Las Vegas last year that left 58 people dead from sniper fire. Rich Guidice, first deputy of the city’s Office of Emergency Management and Communications, said in a Thursday interview with the Tribune that he didn’t want to speculate on Paddock’s possible Chicago plans, but his team took into consideration the Las Vegas shooting and other incidents around the world when devising security protocols.