Random music news for Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Random music news for Wednesday, July 18, 2018
Proof that the Foo Fighters will perform with anyone. Here’s me on Global News AM 640 talking about the facial recognition technology that’s coming to concerts. Finally: an affordable High-Res Audio player. Monday’s press conference must have given them a whole bunch of new ideas. For anyone who loves Hi-Res Audio when it comes to their music, this is an encouraging sign that more people are being turned on to it…
This sign language interpreter CRUSHES it at a Slayer show. A solar-powered accordion? Why are all these artists are now dumping their managers? That’s what some people say. Sting’s musical is coming to Toronto in February 2019. According to its latest quarterly report, Napster (the legit streaming company that used to be known as Rhapsody) is profitable. Yep. Yep. A “social ticketing app” for music? I really should pay more attention to what’s happening in our country rather than watching the next installment of the White House dumpster fire. Spotify can’t say that. What’s that? Watch. Remember when Katy Perry purchased that convent and the controversy that followed? In fact, it’s had three profitable quarters in a row. A ginger emoji? Maybe some music news for July 18, 2018, will help. It’s almost time to move in. Could be. Bad Religion is in the process of recording an entire album of “fuck Trump” songs. But it’s hard to turn away, innit? Are podcasts now more popular than blogs? Could Instagram turn into the music industry’s best friend?

More Music From The Inbox 18 Jul 2018 Mr. Dreem, Odina, Alex Bayly and More!

More Music From The Inbox 18 Jul 2018 Mr. Dreem, Odina, Alex Bayly and More!
Artist: Mr. Dreem, “You Versus The World”
Album: The Impossible Sometimes

These brothers from North Carolina are really onto something
Sounds like:  pure joy
Link/Listen/Watch:

Artist: Odina, “I’ll Carry You”
Album: Nothing Makes Sense

I love this deeply personal release from an impressive talent
Sounds like:  purity of self and spirit
Link/Listen/Watch:

Artist: Alex Bayly, “Clear Air Turbulence”  
Album: N/A

Brilliant guitarist and song writer
Sounds like:  dream pop bliss
Link/Listen/Watch:

Artist: Neil Frances, “Come Back Around”  
Album: N/A

Out of France with that very Euro feel
Sounds like:  electronic dreamscapes
Link/Listen/Watch:

Artist: Cathedrals, “Behave”
Album: N/A

Great indie pop sounds out of San Francisco
Sounds like:  a bit of a Massive Attack vibe
Link/Listen/Watch:

Artist: Uforia, “What It Means To You”
Album: N/A

Out of my birthplace, Toronto, with an original sound
Sounds like:  Some fantastic and much needed rock
Link/Listen/Watch:

Greta Van Fleet: The Video Interview

Just before the band played their first of two sold-out shows in Toronto (7,500 each night), I had a chance to sit down with guitarist Jake Kiszka, one of the three brothers in Greta Van Fleet. Take a look. If you want more interviews like this, subscribe to the YouTube channel for 102.1 the Edge.
Greta Van Fleet: The Video Interview

Geeks and Beats Podcast, episode 192: The Sci-Fi Future is Female

Geeks and Beats Podcast, episode 192: The Sci-Fi Future is Female
By the way, we’re a total non-profit operation that performs this selfless service for benefit of all humanity. http://media.blubrry.com/geeksandbeats/p/www.geeksandbeats.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/S05E49-The-Sci-Fi-Future-is-Female.mp3
Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 37:22 — 35.1MB) | Embed
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Visit the Geeks and Beats website to sample all kinds of geeky goodness provided daily by our crack staff of writers and contributors who are offering up fascinating content every single day. Georgia Tech professor and author Lisa Yaszek joins the geeks to talk about sci-fi predictions come true, misconceptions about female authors of the early 1900s, how we got “food in pill form” as a trope, and the universal geek enthusiasm for Galaxy Quest. But did you know Sears & Roebuck gets the credit for bringing another science fiction gadget to your pocket? Plus, more on our Live on Facebook Live from Michael’s Back Deck Show show. Listen now! Sure, everyone credits Star Trek for bringing us cellphones. If you’d like to support the show (please?) go here. But we still have our fixed costs.

Blame the victims: Survivors of the Route 91 Festival SUED after last year’s Las Vegas massacre

Blame the victims: Survivors of the Route 91 Festival SUED after last year’s Las Vegas massacre
It’s all about avoiding liability in the largest mass shooting in US history. The company is hanging its position on some 2002 legislation that protects companies from things like terrorist attacks if they use “anti-terrorism” technology or anything else that “help[s] prevent and respond to mass violence.” Since the Route 91’s security company, Contemporary Services Corp, has been certified by the US Department of Homeland Security, then MGM did all they were required to do and thus blameless in the shootings. Huh? Huh? This is cold, even for the coldest-blooded of all shark-like lawyers. MGM isn’t asking for any money from this litigation. As you’d expect, a number of concert-goers have filed lawsuits against MGM Resorts (the owner of the Mandalay Bay Hotel from which Paddock fired from his 32nd floor room0, Live Nation (the promoter) and Paddock’s estate. They’re just trying to protect its ass against lawsuits from the victims’ families and survivors. What? Stood up for themselves, that’s what. What? Read more here and here. What did these people do? MGM Resorts is fighting back with its own lawsuits, saying that it has no liability in the issue because of the security measures it put in place for the festival. The company that owns the site of the Route 91 Harvest Festival–the event that saw 58 people killed by sniper Stephen Paddock and hundreds more injured–has filed lawsuits against more than a thousand people.  

Death metal grandma: Watch

The freakiest she ever got with music was Charlie Pride. I’m trying to imagine my grandma doing something like this.
Death metal grandma: Watch

Global concert ticket sales hit new heights, but so do ticket prices

Nice, right? This, while total tickets sold remained relatively constant from last year with a small 2.1% drop to 22.9 million from last year’s 23.4 million. That means that the higher prices more than compensated. The tally’s ticket price high was set by “Springsteen On Broadway” which on average cost $509 – more than 12 times as much as the survey’s lowest tout of $40 for Marvel Universe Live! But if you do the math, a lot of this increase is due to higher ticket prices. The precipitous rise speaks to the industry’s aggressive pricing strategy to better meet demand and exclude the secondary market. Second spot went to Bruno Mars (average ticket price: $132) and followed by The Rolling Stones (average price: $159). […]
Much like internationally, however, the North American market’s average ticket prices for the Top 100 spiked and set a record high at $85.97, with an even steeper 19.1% leap over last year’s $72.16, which again speaks to the industry strategy of better selling into demand. (Via MBW) Interesting, too, that there was actually a small drop (2.1%) in the number of tickets sold vs last year. Pollstar is the go-to place for news on the concert industry. (apples and oranges). The best-selling tour so far this year belongs to Ed Sheeran with a gross of $214 million through 52 shows with 2.6 million tickets going for an average of about $81. According to its 2018 mid-year report, revenues from concert ticket sales are up 12% over this point last year to $2.21 billion USD. I quote:
Soaring average ticket prices contributed significantly to worldwide touring’s ascendant gross with a record high of $96.31 – a 14.1% increase and nearly $12 ($11.91) jump over 2017’s $84.40. Music fans should be happy about a healthy touring environment.
Global concert ticket sales hit new heights, but so do ticket prices

Random music news for Thursday, July 19, 2018

Health Canada says it’s “concerned” about cannabis companies sponsoring music events. Chris Shiflett is planning to sell a whack of guitars from his private collection. It was 25 years ago this week that the Tragically Hip launched their Another Roadside Attraction festival. Toyota’s investment in music festivals seems to be paying off. If you’re making a music video, don’t do this. Dennis Rodman wants to take Kanye West to North Korea. Latin singer Marc Antony just forked over $19 million US for this mansion. Here are some encouraging stats about podcast listening in Canada. Is Walmart thinking of getting into streaming? Is this what’s happening with the theme to the next James Bond movie? On this day in 1977, the first GPS signal was broadcast from a satellite. This is one cool find! More news on how Green Day’s American Idiot is doing well in the Age of Trump. Radiohead is getting great reviews on their current tour. That is one BIG speaker! (Via Tom)
The iPhone IX could come with a fast charger. It looks like it. How can Billy Joel play Madison Square Gardens this many times? Music streaming now takes up 8% of all UK listening. What could possibly go wrong? Imagine trying to get a dinner reservation at this place. It was a 100% military thing back then, but now… Here’s some music news for July 19, 2018. More love for the contributions of the BBC’s Radiophonic Workshop. Tom Petty sings from beyond the grave. Research I discovered: The average Brit between the ages of 15-24 spends 33% of their weekly “audio time” listening to live radio, 29% streaming music, 18% listening to their own digital music and 9% using music video sites.
Random music news for Thursday, July 19, 2018

New Music From The Inbox: Jonathan Wilson, Tunde Olandrian, Creature Canyon, and more!

New Music From The Inbox: Jonathan Wilson, Tunde Olandrian, Creature Canyon, and more!
This is music that demands attention. Listen:

Artist:Jonathan Wilson
Song: Sunset Blvd
Album: Rare Birds
A piano driven, cinematic and melodic ballad that is detailed, complex, and strikingly clear in its expression. The Flint Michigan native says that ““I’m Here” is a reminder to myself that I exist and am worth something. This is catchy, rhythmic, blues-tinted alt rock song with sharp and enchanting vocals. Watch/Listen: Listen:

Artist: Tunde Olaniran
Song: I’m Here
Album: Stranger
I’m Here is a bold, dance floor ready anthem with soulful vocals that will make your head spin and enough unexpectedness and creativity to make it an interesting listen as well. It is both fragile and bold, and has an emotional depth that is easy to get lost in. Artist: Anjulie & Pusher
Song: All We Can Do
EP: The Paperman
This is a song about gun violence that doesn’t sound like a song on gun violence. It’s also, in part, is about being from a city like Flint and still living here.”
Listen:

Artist: Valley Queen
Song: Two of Cups
Album: Supergiant
From this LA rock band’s debut ep comes a song with an otherworldly, ethereal energy. It has an irresistible rhythm and happy vibes! This is music that is expertly crafted. Watch/listen:

Artist: Creature Canyon
Song: Did You Want That?

Radiohead performs in Toronto for the first time since a stage collapse killed a member of their road crew

Radiohead performs in Toronto for the first time since a stage collapse killed a member of their road crew
“Radiohead have been excellent. Until now. … But they’ve been smashing, really. He was 33. It’s above and beyond the call. They did invite us out, but I have to come out for the inquest and I can’t really be going backwards and forwards across to Toronto. The Toronto Star has this story. They’re going to be in Toronto, they’re going to be performing, and the crew and the band, I think, they witnessed things that we’ve not witnessed, so it’s not going to be pleasant for them. But, to be quite honest, they’ve been like family,” Johnson says. “The band has got to go through the motions this week. The band has two shows for the Scotiabank Arena (né The ACC) tonight and tomorrow. So I’m hoping, for them, that the Toronto shows will, perhaps, draw a line.”
Keep reading. “They were Scott’s friends, really, and not ours. Drummer Phil Selway appeared on the BBC from Toronto. An inquest is being planned, but no date has been set. At around 4 in the afternoon on Saturday, June 16, 2012, something terrible happened at Downsview Park in Toronto. They really have been incredibly supportive. Three other members of the crew were hurt. “There have been no real answers… Without the answers we can’t ensure that an accident like this can’t happen again.” Radiohead drummer Philip Selway says it’s “frustrating” that the court case regarding the death of their drum technician broke down #newsnight pic.twitter.com/jTnoFDJCql
— BBC Newsnight (@BBCNewsnight) July 18, 2018 (Here’s my story on the fiasco.)
Radiohead hasn’t been back to Toronto since. “I’ve had a message from some of the crew and I don’t think that they’re looking forward to being there, you know?” Scott Johnson’s father, Ken, sighed from the home he shares with his wife, Sue, in the English village of Hickleton, South Yorkshire, this week. As much as I might enjoy to see the band, I also sort of try to take a bit more of a back seat.”
He had nothing but praise for the band’s support over the years since his son’s death. A part of the stage constructed for that night’s Radiohead show gave way, plummetting to the ground and killing drum tech Scott Johnson. What followed was a farcical train of investigations, lawsuits, countersuits, charges, trials and, in the end, a mistrial that left everything unresolved. Imagine how they’ll feel setting foot in the city and the province that has so far denied them and, more importantly, the family of Scott Johnson any kind of justice. They’ve been there if I needed it and I know that they’re there and, for me, I’ve probably found some new friends in them. He was killed by a video monitor that weighed 2,270 kg.

A great video series: “What Makes This Song Great?”

I love it when someone deconstructs a song in a way that explains why it stands above others. (Thanks to Walter for the tip.) This is exactly what Rick Beato does with his video series, “What Makes This Song Great?” Here’s a sample.
A great video series: “What Makes This Song Great?”

This Trump-Putin video mashup with the opening theme of The Golden Girls is close to perfect

Although this video mashup was posted two years ago, months before Donald Trump was elected prescient, it was weirdly and brilliantly prescient when it comes to the events of June and July 2018. (Via Tom) You’ll see what I mean.
This Trump-Putin video mashup with the opening theme of The Golden Girls is close to perfect

Radiohead’s Toronto Reckoning

You didn’t need a Pitchfork to inform you the Abingdon quintet were a group on the verge of something seismic when OK Computer came out; that places like Varsity Arena, the Opera House and Arrow Hall by Pearson airport weren’t going to be able to contain their greatness for much longer. – AC]

One of the unfortunate fallouts from all this feet-dragging, besides justice for someone who lost their life, is how it forced the band to skip one of their most favourite and fan-loyal markets. The parties you’d think would be held responsible were stayed, or the ultimate definition of in limbo, legally speaking. Radiohead had made Toronto a regular stop on their international itineraries for as long as they’ve been touring behind albums, starting with Pablo Honey in 1993. – AC]
I’m not usually one for emotion, but I can only imagine how much of that energy will be running through Scotiabank Arena on Thursday, July 19th as well as Friday, July 20th. Radiohead are coming back to town for their first show since 2008 at the then-named Molson Amphitheatre. Britpop didn’t quite classify them either, so while Blur and especially Oasis were thrust into a blinding spotlight from the outset, Radiohead established a solid foundation by working the shite out of smaller rooms such as the RPM Club and Warehouse (which were part of The Guvernment complex that is now home to ANOTHER condo development, like we need more of those in Toronto). In total before that fateful date, 86 individual songs have been performed over 14 shows, covering 7 full-length releases that continually redefined the meaning of “alternative.”

Radiohead definitely weren’t grunge, although there was a lot of carryover amongst connoisseurs of the less-than-studio-perfect guitar sounds that permeate their debut as well as The Bends. The shows tonight and tomorrow (July 19-20) at the Scotiabank Arena will no doubt be very emotional. The first time they set foot on Canadian soil was in July of that year for Edgefest at Ontario Place’s famous rotating Forum stage. Photo credit: Steve Keros

Because of its wiki-like nature Setlist.fm isn’t always the most reliable source, but I am hard-pressed to think of another artist besides maybe the Hip who were at Maple Leaf Gardens during its waning days as an entertainment mecca, AND Air Canada Centre shortly after their corporate logoed doors opened. The sets were different enough from one another that you kind of had to be at both to get the full experience, and featured material that would only be heard sixteen months from then on In Rainbows, giving “Radioheads” an early start for when they’d be back for the penultimate amphitheatre show. Just when you thought they couldn’t possibly get any bigger, they found themselves in the vast greenspace of Barrie’s Molson Park followed by SkyDome two years later to promote Hail to the Thief, an album whose themes Radiohead should really think of revisiting. Correspondent Gilles LeBlanc has this preview. And not because Toronto concertgoers still sentimentally call it Air Canada Centre. [Radiohead returns to Toronto tonight for the first time since the tragic stage collapse of June 2012 that killed drum tech Scott Johnson. [Note: The band is still pushing for answers. If you’re going to Scotiabank Arena, brace yourself for all the feels. As many a fan of theirs has expressed to me, the most memorable Radiohead presentations in Toronto may have arguably been the two nights they spent at Hummingbird Centre in 2006 prior to Sony’s rechristening of it. The stage collapsed as he was setting things up, crushed under scaffolding whose weight negligently wasn’t accounted for. One of those tracks on In Rainbows is “Reckoner”, dedicated to all human beings with its opening line about how you can’t take it with yer; I highly encourage you all to read Jon Dekel of The Globe and Mail’s interview with Radiohead (paywall be damned), about how much the song has come to mean in relation to Scott Johnson. What was supposed to be a triumphant sendoff to celebrate a successful North American run for The King of Limbs turned tragic with the death of drum tech Scott Johnson. One entry you won’t find on Setlist.fm however is Downsview Park for June 16th, 2012. Alan Cross will surely remember how there were more than a few promo appearances at his alt-friendly station 102.1 The Edge, MuchMusic’s studios, and even an in-store for chrissakes at the iconic Sam the Record Man that I regret not ing more of an effort to go to back in the day. Thanks to Goldenvoice’s Canadian arm for helping make this happen, but more kudos obviously to the band itself for having the courage to carry on and face what was a bleak chapter in Radiohead’s otherwise brilliant music history. You could also tell Radiohead were laying the groundwork for what was to come, weeding out the diehards from the bandwagoners through actions like deciding to no longer play “Creep”, which my youngest brother who spent his entire allowance to go to Arrow Hall still harbours a little resentment towards them over. An inquest is being planned but hasn’t been scheduled yet.
Radiohead’s Toronto Reckoning