Geeks and Beats podcast, episode 191: Twice in a Lifetime

Geeks and Beats podcast, episode 191: Twice in a Lifetime
That means no alcohol. We explain. Eric Alper drops by the studio with his latest isolated vocal track: Talking Heads’ “Once in a Lifetime.” We’ll learn how the band developed its style, and that one of the most important songs of the 20th century wasn’t much of a hit. Note: This week’s podcast was recorded at 10 in the morning as opposed to our more civilized time of 7pm. Plus: our Facebook Live on Michael’s Back Deck show has a date. iPhone owner? But we still have our fixed costs. By the way, we’re a total non-profit operation that performs this selfless service for benefit of all humanity. http://media.blubrry.com/geeksandbeats/p/www.geeksandbeats.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/S05E48-Twice-in-a-Lifetime.mp3
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How is Travis Barker of blink-182 doing with those blood clots in his arms?

How is Travis Barker of blink-182 doing with those blood clots in his arms?
So where do things stand with Travis today? He posted this video of a doctor’s visit. Complicating matters was an infection–cellulitis–which can be extremely nasty. A few weeks ago, we heard that blink-182 had to cancel some of the shows in their Las Vegas residency because drummer Travis Barker was diagnosed as having blood clots in his arms.   SPOILER ALERT: The news is good. If not treated properly with blood thinners, the clots could have broken off–something that could have happened with energetic drumming–traveled through his bloodstream to his heart, lungs or brain. And given that Travis’ skin doesn’t have the best integrity because of the burns he received in that terrible jet crash in 2008, he has to be very careful. That would have been very, very bad.

Here’s a deep look into music’s fentanyl crisis. This is an important article.

This is an important article. Here’s a deep look into music’s fentanyl crisis.
A fatal fentanyl overdose can happen in barely one minute. Of the nearly 65,000 fatal opioid overdoses in the U.S. in 2016 (the most recent survey), one-third were fentanyl-related, double the amount from the year before. This happened after doctors cut back on prescribing OxyContin in 2007, when the government sued its manufacturer for misleading the public about the drug’s addictive risks. The drug has surpassed heroin as the leading cause of overdose deaths, and new data shows that fentanyl overdose deaths jumped 30 percent between July 2016 and September 2017. Fentanyl was invented in 1959 to help cancer patients cope with intense post-surgical pain. “A tiny difference in your content can mean someone dying. Lil Peep. Prince. You need a very sophisticated lab in order to measure a concentration that would be safe.”
This is an important read. These days, it’s prescribed as a lollipop or a patch, which slowly releases the dosage through the skin, typically used for a few days after a major surgery. Keep going. Beyond the music industry, fentanyl has emerged as the most dangerous new drug in a generation. “The dose you require is minuscule, like a grain of salt,” says Volkow. Former Wilco guitarist Jay Bennet. Rolling Stone takes a look at the fentanyl crisis in the music industry. Paul Gray of Slipknot. Though illegal in pill form, black-market fentanyl pills have become common in the past decade. Opioid users had to look elsewhere, and turned to heroin, which dealers started mixing with fentanyl for a faster-acting, more euphoric and addictive high. Quite possibly Dolores O’Riordan of The Cranberries. Three Doors Down guitarist Matt Roberts. Tom Petty. The thing they all have in common is fentanyl, the opioid 30 times stronger than heroin and available in ultra-lethal forms on the black market.