An update on the upcoming Day of 1000 Musicians in Niagara Falls (Pay attention because this is cool.)

Day of 1000 Musicians is a fundraising event that will feature 250 guitarists, 250 vocalists, 250 drummer and 250 bassists performing six songs en masse! Along with raising money for a good cause, the hope is that this event brings in all sorts of musicians. From garage rock, to playing the occasional show at a coffee shop to full blown professional musicians. As a prequel to the big performance, there’s quite a few other musical events happening. And rock you will! Created by high school buddies Paul Lemire and John Fillion, this event is inspired by Italy’s similar endeavor, “Rockin’ 100”, that took place in 2016. Two: to raise funds for local music therapy programs and Project SHARE. It doesn’t discriminate against skill; you just need to have a passion to play. Registration is still open, so if you feel like shaking your bones with some rock and roll, check out the event page here! There are two goals to this event. One: to offer a jam session like never before. The lineup of songs and all the info you need for the day of is officially ready. If you want to rock out, this is the place to go. Project SHARE is a charity that serves individuals living in poverty in the Niagara Falls community. On Saturday, July 21st, at Niagara Falls’ Firemen’s Park, a “first time in North America” event will bring 1000 musicians together for a day of music! Rhere are a bunch of performances by bands such as teenage classic rockers MESH and FanZZango, a ZZ Top cover band. Outfitted with beards and all! We think you’ll recognize a couple of these names. Turning it up to 11 just isn’t enough for some people. Ex MuchMusic VJ Kim Clarke Champniss is taking over emcee duties for the first half of the afternoon.
An update on the upcoming Day of 1000 Musicians in Niagara Falls (Pay attention because this is cool.)

Were you ever a fan of WKRP in Cincinnati? Here’s why Howard Hesseman became Dr. Johnny Fever

Here’s why Howard Hesseman became Dr. Were you ever a fan of WKRP in Cincinnati? Johnny Fever
As fate would have it, though, the casting of Johnny Fever would lend even more credence to the show, especially for attentive fans who knew the background of the actor who played the radio “doctor.”
Keep reading. This article from MeTV (via Mayor McCheese) explains why Hesseman was perfect for this role. Looking back, the sitcom seems to have acted like a true pop merger, and all the letters the show received in its four-season run from DJs praising how the show just nailed their lifestyle only further proved that Wilson’s head was in the right place when fleshing out his series idea. And Howard Hesseman did bring a certain sort of realism to the role. He also based characters on real figures in radio, including Andy Travis, Arthur Carlson and, of course, DJ Johnny Fever. Series creator Hugh Wilson took depicting an independent freeform radio station very seriously, arguably putting in more effort to create a believable WKRP workplace than prior hit shows like The Mary Tyler Moore Show or The Dick Van Dyke Show did depicting different TV networks’ inner workings. And there were plenty of Dr. It was a skewed introduction, especially on the technical end–things don’t really operate in a control room like that–but the characters were more than just stereotypes. However, for all his attention to detail, when Wilson was casting these characters, he didn’t exactly prioritize casting real DJs. WKRP in Cincinnati gave the workplace sitcom a new spin when it arrived in 1978, quite literally. To write episodes and characters for WKRP in Cincinnati, Wilson borrowed real events that actually happened at radio stations. In many ways the pains that Wilson took to accurately portray indie radio life helped transform the show into so much more than TV. The show broke bands just like a real radio station, too. For many future radio people of a certain generation, WKPR in Cincinnati was their first exposure to that business. Johnny Fevers in radio: trainwreck undisciplined irreverent weirdos who were always getting into/causing trouble. The beautiful receptionist, the squirrely news guy, the uncool salesman, the program director with the shaggy hair and cheesy jackets, the cool nighttime jock–they were all based on the real sorts of people who ended up in radio.

Can you use math to determine if a song is good or not?

What is left out, in short, is the experience of the painting. Even if all of this turns out to be factually true, such a description leaves a lot out: the way (to take one of a potentially limitless set of examples) a milkmaid tilts a jug so that falling rivulets of milk are caught in a ray of late afternoon sunlight. Or is there? The imperative to provide “analytics” for everything from financial portfolios to security risk, to work and shopping habits seems always on the verge of converting all of experience into some tidy table of figures. By now it is commonplace to point out how much of our lives are subject to algorithms. There’s no way we’ll all agree that a particular song is “good.” Whatever “good” means. Keep reading. Art, it is argued, is the place where analytics hit a wall. Music is more complicated, though, because it is fundamentally bound up with numbers. The same song that gives me chills and makes the hair on the back of my neck stands up has you running screaming from the room. Measurement misses the point. The New Republic thinks that the solution might lie in mathematics. Music is a highly, highly subjective things. Arguments about where or whether we reach something human and unquantifiable typically end up invoking, more or less indignantly, aesthetic experience. The idea that works of art can be explained quantitatively (aside from quoting some dollar amount), might be caricatured in the description of, say, a Vermeer, by noting that it is a 17 7/8 inch high by 16 1/8 inch wide canvas, on which are arranged a certain combination of color-coded patches and flecks, followed by an account of the chemical processes at work when the pigments change as the picture suffers the ravages of time.
Can you use math to determine if a song is good or not?

Streaming service libraries have up to 50 million songs, but…

But, in the timeless words of Bad Boy, mo’ money, mo’ problems. We’re approaching the point where every song ever recorded by the human race is available on streaming music service. Streaming, unsurprisingly, is driving this surge. It’s jaw-dropping. Adoption of streaming by consumers continues at breakneck speed. With T Swift pivoting to rap rhythms and Bodak Yellow topping Pitchfork’s year end list, Kendrick’s “HUMBLE” emerging as the most streamed audio and Drake crowned as the most streamed artist, it feels like the genre is catapulting into pole position with quite a bit of momentum. THE YEAR IN CHART TRICKS, SURPRISES & SHENANIGANS
(can’t wait for Bebe Rexha featuring 6ix9ine in 2018) https://t.co/YBv3ZbwFbQ
— Joe Coscarelli (@joecoscarelli) December 27, 2017

Why is this happening? This article at Elixglobal.com examines the phenomenon. In other words, we have more people than ever listening to music, but they’re listening to fewer songs. However…
The top 10% of songs account for 99.2% percent of streams — all of them, basically. The relationship with digital platforms and rap’s rise is kind of a chicken-and-egg scenario, but the correlation is vivid and apparent. And record labels are back in the black thanks to thanks to revenues from streaming. All kinds of record-setting stats can be found in analytics company Buzzangle Music’s annual report. Global streams increased by 50% in the last year alone, rising to 377 billion streams. There were twice as many streams on an average day in 2017 as there were total song downloads in the entire year. Just as wild, just 1000 songs account for 122 billion listens— fully one-third of all streams. And as we know, hip-hop took over the charts in 2017. Keep reading.
Streaming service libraries have up to 50 million songs, but…

Music Tech MeetUp Round 14 was Fascinating

A special thanks to our partners Bluesound, MQA and Steam Whistle for helping us put on such a fun and informative event. Thanks to everyone who came out to our 14th Music Tech Event. It’s always free to attend and, thanks to our partnerships, we always have lots of pizza, drinks, and snacks waiting for you at the event!  And if you were there last week, maybe one of our photographers caught you on camera! Music Tech MeetUp: Round 14



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Flickr Album Gallery Powered By: Weblizar If you missed wednesday’s event, don’t worry. We run our Music Tech events every 7-8 weeks. One luck attendee walked away with a Bluesound Node 2 player! (Food and drinks are all free of charge, hence the need to RSVP to our events.)
Follow us on the MeetUp Page, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to stay up to date. It was great to chat with and meet lots of Music and Tech industry veterans, newcomers, enthusiasts, and experts.
Music Tech MeetUp Round 14 was Fascinating

Random music news for Monday, June 25, 2108

I love when cities leave pianos in random locations like this. (Via Deepak)
And to follow that up, Lars Ulrich playing the trombone. Find out here. Probably. Kenny Rogers just sold his mansion in Atlanta. You know how Algeria is going to cut cheating on high school exams? And as for music news for June 25, 2018…

Because it’s Monday, you need this school choir from India covering Metallica. The rainbow flag of gay pride was first flown in San Francisco on this day in 1978. (Via Tom)
I’d never see this before: How Pink Floyd reunited for Live 8. Police received a panicked call about a man with a gun. Here’s another example of how the newly emerging legal weed industry is partnering with the music industry. This is a great article about The Cameron House, a Toronto venue that seems to be immortal. How big is the bladder of Justin Bieber’s bodyguard? Turns out it was a man with a didgeridoo. Here’s the reason I ask. Another rock doc in the making: Sparks. Ever wonder what happens on rock stars’ private planes? Weird, but true. (Via Walter) Will we soon by unlocking our cars with phones instead of fobs? Here you go with that, too. Ever wonder about the roots of punk rock drinking songs? The site of the original Woodstock has been turned into an archeological dig to find hippy artifacts. Smart thermostats, locks, and lights can be used as tools of domestic abuse. Here you go. By shutting down the Internet. These earbuds from Bose are designed to combat insomnia. Fun: How much did a personal computer cost the year you were born? Britain’s legendary Isle of Wight Festival is celebrating its 50th anniversary.
Random music news for Monday, June 25, 2108

New Music from the Inbox for June 25, 2018: The Dead Love, Jake & The Jellyfish, Avantist, & More!

Listen:

Artist: The New Respects
Song: “We Ain’t Goin’ Nowhere”
Album: Single

From their upcoming debut album, The New Respects’ latest single is all about them. Watch:

Artist: Avantist
Song: “UVB_76”
Album: Terasoma EP

From their latest EP, this song by Chicago’s post-punk band Avantist is based on a mysterious radio signal that broadcasts in Russia. Listen:

Artist: Rotana
Song: “Crime”
Album: Single

Saudi Arabian artist Rotana has been releasing stripped back demos with no mastering or mixing, and this is her latest one. Listen:

Artist: The Kooks
Song: “All The Time”
Album: Single

This band is getting ready to release their fifth album after a successful US tour. Watch: Artist: The Dead Love
Song: “Ordinary”
Album: Single

Sydney band The Dead Love have a cool, grungy style. Watch:

Artist: Jake & The Jellyfish
Song: “Spokesdog”
Album: Long In Winters

Jake & The Jellyfish create a unique sound with their blend of punk and folk.
New Music from the Inbox for June 25, 2018: The Dead Love, Jake & The Jellyfish, Avantist, & More!

How the legal weed industry will affect the music industry

If Molson can sponsor a tour and Budweiser can have a venue named after it, why couldn’t another legal, government-regulated recreational ingestible product do the same? Jean Richer, senior vice president of sales and marketing, wants UP to head in this direction. While regulations for marketing pot are still being worked out — some shows, tours, and festivals have already struck deals with licensed pot producers, occupying a legal grey area of Bill C-45 — Richer and other cannabis companies are most anxious to get into the music endorsement/sponsorship space. After all, this was part of his job when he worked as a market manager for AB InBev, the massive Belgian-Brazilian beer consortium. Keep reading. – AC]
Back in January, UP Cannabis, one of the country’s budding (sorry) legal marijuana producers, nailed down an agreement with The Feldman Agency, a major talent booking organization whose roster includes everyone from Alessia Cara and the Barenaked Ladies to Our Lady Peace and Michael Bublé. Absolutely. Here’s me talking about the subject with Matt Gurney on AM 640 Global Radio. In addition to getting gigs for its clients, Feldman also specializes in brand integration projects. As with alcohol, music and marijuana have always gone together. So, could Feldman help UP get deeper into the music space? [This was my weekly column for GlobalNews.ca.
How the legal weed industry will affect the music industry

Is this the most Canadian music video EVER? Maybe.

  That made sense, given that it was inspired by the cancer death of Gord Downie. It doesn’t get much more Canadian than this. Ancient Engines, an indie band from Kelowna, BC, wanted to make a real Canadian statement with the video for their new song, Gordiebrook. Read more at Kelowna Now. Called “Gordiebrook,” the video–well, just watch.
Maybe. Is this the most Canadian music video EVER?

This Canadian audio technology is changing concert sound

This Canadian audio technology is changing concert sound
How can organizers please the punters while also respecting the wishes of the neighbours of the concert site? One of the big issues of staging an outdoor music event is the noise. A Canadian firm called PK Sound may have the solution. From the CBC:

Read more here.

Ahead of new rules for Ontario (which come into effect this weekend), New York State passes its own laws around secondary ticketing

Ahead of new rules for Ontario (which come into effect this weekend), New York State passes its own laws around secondary ticketing
“All-in pricing” is something the Canadian government imposed on airline tickets. Other jurisdictions like BC and Alberta are looking at the New York and Ontario situations very carefully. This isn’t over by a long shot. Resellers will have to make it very, very clear that they are RESELLERS and not the primary source of the tickets. If you’re at all interested in the broken system of concert ticket sales, I strongly suggest you tune in tonight (June 25). The full cost of the ticket must be disclosed. (She was voted out in the June 7 election, but her bill lives on). In other words, if you buy one of those tickets, you’re buying something that doesn’t yet exist. That includes all fees upfront instead of several clicks through the transaction. Come July 1, a slew of new rules will be introduced governing the sale of concert tickets in Ontario, the dumbest of which is the imposition of a price cap on the tickets sold on the secondary market. (I outline how it’s doomed to fail here.) Yet despite plenty of outcry by the ticketing industry, the touring industry and the general public, these new laws are set to come into effect. If you’re in Ontario, The Agenda with Steve Paikin, will tackle this issue tonight (8 pm ET). If resellers can’t supply these ticket or at the advertised price, they have to provide a refund within ten days. Meanwhile, the New York State Legislature has expanded that state’s rules on ticketing. I’m one of the guests, as is Sophie Kiwala, the former Liberal MP that introduced the new bill. Here’s what’s new:

Ticket resellers have to be upfront when they are selling tickets they don’t yet possess. This is called “speculative selling.” Brokers advertise tickets for shows that haven’t yet gone on sale because they’re positive that their contacts will be able to supply them.   Buyer beware.

“What Linkin Park gave to pop music”

“What Linkin Park gave to pop music”
Bono’s comment got me thinking not just about that lineage of sound and sentiment, but about Chester Bennington, the Linkin Park singer whose suicide a year ago this summer I’ve had very much in mind. Rage is at the heart of it.” He was airing the sort of conventional wisdom you most commonly hear ranted from a barstool: Rock and roll is rooted in virility, and the genre’s decline in popularity represents a worrisome triumph of the feminine. As we approach the first anniversary of Chester Bennington’s death on July 20, there’s plenty to ruminate upon when it comes to his career, the role of Linkin Park, and how depression is something that cannot and should not ever be ignored. This is from The Atlantic:
At the end of 2017, U2’s Bono made one of his periodic pronouncements about the state of rock and roll. “I think music has gotten very girly,” he told Rolling Stone. Keep reading. Though such gender anxieties uncannily mirror the ones driving national politics, rock is of course bigger than one gender or one emotion—ask Joan Jett or Courtney Barnett. If angry men loom large in the genre’s history, it’s not because they have tapped into some elemental well of gender-specific sentiment. Instead, they have often made their mark by expanding the boundaries of what anger or sadness, or anger and sadness together, can sound like for guys. “There are some good things about that, but hip-hop is the only place for young male anger at the moment—and that’s not good … In the end, what is rock & roll?

Weekly survey: What’s your favourite vantage point at a concert?

Weekly survey: What’s your favourite vantage point at a concert?
What’s your favourite vantage point at a show? Finding the right place to stand/sit at a concert is a challenge. If it’s a seated venue, we’re often happy with whatever we can get, but there are still situations where you can choose where you sit. And why? Some people prefer to be as close to the front as possible. It theoretically makes sense that’s where the best sound will be. Then there’s the matter of festivals. Plus it’s easier to duck out to the bathroom. When it comes to general admission situations–the floors at an arena or stadium or at a club–we have much more latitude. Me? Where’s the best place to spend the day? Others like to hang back where the volume (and the crowd) isn’t quite so punishing. I like to hang by the soundboard. After all, everyone is getting the mix created by the guy standing there.