If you think that the vinyl resurrection is just a fad, think again.

If you think that the vinyl resurrection is just a fad, think again.
“It’s not real. The 2018 edition was the most successful. The success of the first event, held on April 19, 2008, took everyone (including artists and labels) by surprise. “It’s a fad,” he keeps saying. He just won’t admit wrong
Sorry, dude, but I’m about to throw more numbers and research in your face. Record Store Day now extends around the world, with annual events in the U.S., Canada, Mexico, the UK, Ireland, Spain, France, Germany, Holland, Belgium, Italy, Japan, and Australia. We can trace much of the vinyl revival to the establishment of Record Store Day in 2007, a Hail Mary attempt by Eric Levin, Michael Kurtz, Carrie Colliton, Amy Dorfman, Don Van Cleave, and Brian Poehner, a group of Baltimore record store owners desperate to save their dying businesses. RSD events have also been held in places like Turkey and South Africa. Keep reading. [This is my weekly column for GlobalNews.ca. I followed up on the column on Global News AM 640 today, too. Here are the top-selling records for the week ending April 26, according to Nielsen Music. It’s just a matter of time before it dies off.”
I’ve confronted him with all kinds of industry numbers, hard sales statistics, and endless anecdotes about how vinyl is more popular than it’s been since at least the late 1980s — 1988 was the high water mark — but he won’t budge. – AC]
I have a running argument with an industry colleague who believes that the resurrection of vinyl is nothing but hype. There’s no future in the format. Vinyl sales have vectored upward ever since with nonstop double-digit year-over-growth.