Have you ever done “The Hokey Pokey?” Then read this.

Composer Al Tabor was also entertaining Canadian troops in wartime London, and in 1942 he wrote a participation dance song called “The Hokey Pokey.” He claims the name came from the London ice cream vendors of his youth, called “Hokey Pokey Men.” The accompanying dance was very similar to Kennedy’s. The song was a regional favorite at dances and resorts for the rest of the 1940s, but that still isn’t the song we know today. You do the Hokey Pokey,
And you turn it all around,
That’s what it’s all about…”
No other song seems to symbolize a good time for people and bring smiles to their faces to quite the same extent as “The Hokey Pokey.” But where did this quirky song come from? Keep going. Doing “The Hokey Pokey” has been a weird dance meme for decades. MEANWHILE, ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE POND …
In 1946, totally unaware of the British “Hokey Cokey” and “Hokey Pokey,” two Scranton, Pennsylvania musicians—Robert Degan and Joe Brier—recorded “The Hokey-Pokey Dance” to entertain summer vacationers at Poconos Mountains resorts. From Mental Floss. LONDON ORIGINS
In 1942, Irish songwriter and publisher Jimmy Kennedy, best known for “The Teddy Bear’s Picnic,” created a dance, and an instructional song to go with it, called “The Hokey Cokey.”
Written to entertain Canadian troops stationed in London, the song was similar to the “Hokey Pokey” we all know today. You put your right foot out,
You put your right foot in,
And you shake it all about. It’s complicated. The history of the song and the dance wonderfully strange.
Have you ever done “The Hokey Pokey?” Then read this.