An interview with the man made the music for Seinfeld

An interview with the man made the music for Seinfeld
Of all the TV shows from the past 30 years, few have had a signature musical sound as distinctive and memorable as Seinfeld. Larry LeBlanc of Celebrity Access sat down with Jonathan Wolff, the man who created all those unforgettable bumpers. Composer Jonathan Wolff’s life changed forever after he received a phone call in 1989 from comedian Jerry Seinfeld seeking a theme song for his new television series, then called “The Seinfeld Chronicles.”
Something catchy that would underscore the stand-up routines he was doing at the opening of each episode, and that also could be used between scenes during the show. With “Seinfeld,” Wolff’s reputation, of course, skyrocketed; and his life began moving at a dizzying speed that might overwhelm others. Today, Wolff lectures to music and law students at universities throughout the United States about how his understanding of business strategy and the intricacies of copyright law shaped his life and colorful career. While best known for creating the theme and music for 9 seasons of “Seinfeld” (180 episodes in all) Wolff was also the composer for about 75 other TV series, including “Will & Grace,” “Who’s The Boss?,” “Married… with Children,” “Saved by the Bell–The College Years,” “The Good Life,” and “Reba,” racking up an astounding 44 original themes. “BUM, DA, DA, DUM, DUM, DU, DU, DU, POP.”. Keep reading. The once self-proclaimed “busiest composer/busiest dealmaker” in Hollywood—there were years where he was working for 14 or 15 shows per week—has retired from providing music for TV, but this Louisville native’s royalty statements are hundreds and hundreds of pages long, from who knows how many countries.