Officials issue measles warning for UK festivals this summer

Officials issue measles warning for UK festivals this summer
Learn more: https://t.co/5JUvwl4FCC @CoventryCC pic.twitter.com/quIv52syD9
— PHE West Midlands (@PHE_WestMids) May 24, 2018

There are other festivals across the UK this weekend, including Swansea, Perth, and Belfast. Officials sent out a warning to anyone heading to this weekend’s BBC Biggest Weekend Festival. Save the emails and comments shouting me down about “how I don’t do my research.” No, it’s YOU who don’t do research because you rely on bullshit Facebook posts, hysterical screeds from people like Jenny McCarthy and all the crap spouted by the now-disgraced Andrew Wakefield. The infection rate is three times greater than what it was a year ago. They’re urging anyone who plans to go to one of these events get vaccinate now. There’s currently an increase in the number of cases of measles in the West Midlands. Measles is a highly infectious viral illness that can sometimes lead to serious complications and can be fatal in very rare cases. Your insane campaign against vaccinations keeps on endangering lives worldwide. #Measles is spreading around the #WestMidlands and festivals are a hotspot for them to spread. Public Health England is very worried about measles being spread at summer festivals this summer. If you are going to the BBC #BiggestWeekend #BiggestWeekendFringe (18-28 May) in Coventry, make sure you have had your #MMR vaccines. Young people and adults aged 15 and over who missed out on MMR vaccine when they were younger and some under-vaccinated communities have been particularly affected. So way to go, anti-vaxxers.

Canada goose 1, punk rock moshpit 0

Patrons at The Broken Bottle were suddenly confronted by an angry Canada goose. There was an invader in the moshpit of an Akron, Ohio, punk club last Saturday night. When it flapped its wings, it sounded like Satan himself was about to sweep me down into hell.”
While some brave souls tried to shoo the goose by throwing their empty cans as they ran away, bartender Brian Reese reportedly pushed gently at the goose with a broom from behind the bar — which seemed to only enrage the creature. Trust me.   But I live across the street from a park that’s frequented by these birds and I know not to mess with them. Okay, so maybe this article is a joke. “But as soon as that thing hissed at me, there was no way in hell I was going to fuck with it. The Hard Times reports:
“Look, I’ve had my teeth knocked out, my ankle broken, and I’ve chased Nazis out of that club,” scene veteran Gabe Watts told reporters.
Canada goose 1, punk rock moshpit 0

This streaming service is “stream-to-own.” Take a look at Resonate.

This streaming service is “stream-to-own.” Take a look at Resonate.
It’s also trying to be more transparent in its financial operations. And it’s based on a cooperative model. After nine plays, the song is completely paid for, and the listener can download it from the service. Peter Harris, a musician with some anti-capitalist tendencies, thinks this is wrong. The company also uses blockchain in an effort to be more transparent when it comes to tracking payments. From The Guardian:
Resonate is a cooperative, and because of that artists, board members and listeners all have stake in the company and participate in decision-making. “The smart contract will receive the money then distribute it out instantly.”
Fascinating. According to its website, 45% of Resonate’s annual profit is distributed to artists, 35% to listeners and 20% to paid staff. Berlin-based Resonate bills itself as an alternative to the monthly subscription plans pushed by the big companies. Listeners pay a cheap price for streaming a song for the first time, which doubles with each play until it is comparable to the price of a regular iTunes download, $1.29. When you stream a song through Spotify, Apple Music or whomever, the artist responsible gets paid a fraction of a cent–somewhere around 4/10 of one penny–so it’s hard for the average musician to make any money. Read more here. Resonate’s alternative to a monthly subscription service is based on a stream-to-own model. He didn’t like the way musicians were being treated by the big streaming companies so he created his own. Again from the Guardian:
Blockchain allows for the use of “smart contracts”, which could be a more efficient and seamless method for paying artists. “You can have a smart contract that says send 30% to the singer, 25% to the guitar player, and split up the rest among the other four members of the band,” Harris says.

George Carlin on singing in the hallways at school back in the day

Tom points us to this bit from 1973 when he talks about what it was like growing up in the 50s and making up songs in the hallways of his high school. George Carlin was truly one of the greatest comedians of all time.
George Carlin on singing in the hallways at school back in the day

More on how Spotify is changing the very nature of music

More on how Spotify is changing the very nature of music
This has led to more song diversity among the top hits. The evidence pointed towards context being more and more of a meaningful touch point with Spotify users. “In the pre-Spotify era of the 2000s, there were a total of only 3,092 songs on the Hot-100,” he wrote on Medium. Spotify is the big dog in the streaming world, and it’s altering the way music is not only distributed but how it’s produced and marketed. In April 2018, we announced a new metric called “Estimated Listeners” (ELs) for playlists. CN’s 103K) and percentage follower gain since March 2017 (CX had 84% gain vs. “In the same amount of time from 2009–2018, there were 3,933 songs on the chart, an increase of 27%.” Songs spent less time, on average, on the list, but that meant more artists had a shot at breaking out into the mainstream. The advent of a la carte song purchases iTunes brought about the slow death of the album. Keep reading. CN’s 62%). Of the 950+ playlists at the time from Spotify’s Genres & Moods section of their interface, CN playlists were understandably more plentiful (57%). For example, the reason most songs are in the 3-4 minute range today is because that was the capacity of the original spinning disc, the 78 RPM record. This involves comparing listeners to followers of playlists. An engineer named Michael Tauberg performed an analysis comparing the Billboard charts in the eight years leading up to the launch of Spotify to the eight subsequent years. Then there’s the whole issue of measuring the popularity of a song on a streaming service. But essentially, CN playlists represented the traditional way of categorizing music (e.g., genres, countries), CX playlists focused more on the user (e.g., working out, gaming, day of the week), and HB playlists mixed both types. From another Medium.com article (WARNING: Lots of numbers and stats ahead!)
In March 2018, we explored the idea of content-based (CN), context-based (CX), and hybrid (HB) playlists on the Spotify platform…if you missed it, check it out here for some context (pun fully intended). Music and technology have always had a symbiotic relationship, especially when it comes to the form in which music is distributed. Keep reading. Definitely check it out on your favorite playlist’s Chartmetric profile, and see how we engineer the feature below. More notably, CX and HB playlists outdid them in both median followers per playlist (HB had over 237K follows vs.   This is from Medium.com
Spotify playlists, which are maintained by a mixture of users, Spotify staff, and algorithms, account for the majority of music listening on the app, and there have been several cases in which a previously-unknown artist has been catapulted onto the Billboard charts after getting prime placement on one of them. And streaming is changing things even further.

Random music news for Monday, May 28, 2018

Random music news for Monday, May 28, 2018
It seems that the Rolling Stones really, really like Florence Welch. Two people died at a music festival in the UK; the rest of the event was canceled. Bored on a Monday? And here’s another assessment of the same thing. Have you seen A Quiet Place? What would you tell your 18-year-old self about what’s happening in this space? Your iPhone may soon also be your hotel room key. A couple of French teenagers have been arrested for hacking into and defacing some YouTube videos. It’s both Memorial Day in the US and a bank holiday in the UK, so let’s see if anything is happening in music news for May 28, 2018. The GDPR thing (and I know you’ve received dozens of goofy emails on this) could stretch outside of Europe. Are you in the music tech space? Here’s a review of the official World Cup song. The secret son is annoyed by this. A total of 15 people were admitted to hospital. Yep. Bon Jovi rosé? More vintage rock photos have made it into the Smithsonian. And if you were to buy that house, you might want to commission a book like this. Just $5 million US. SPOILER: It’s not good. This discusses the sound design of the film. Try a little AMSR fun. Want to buy an 11,500 square-foot place where Tom Petty used to live? Jay-Z apparently has a secret son and won’t take a paternity test to settle the situation. Vevo, the home for so many music videos, is reportedly closing down its website and shutting down its apps. Let’s assess this whole “song of the summer” business again for 2018.

New Music from the Inbox for May 28, 2018: Lydia, The Get Up Kids, Terra Lightfoot, & More!

The single and accompanying video has a nostalgic feel. He is currently on a successful European tour and will soon be in North America. The song has a pulsing, hypnotic feeling. Watch:

Artist: Terra Lightfoot
Song: “Ruthless”
Album: Single

Currently on a world tour for her latest album, Hamilton singer-songwriter Terra Lightfoot just released the third single from New Mistakes. Watch:

Artist: The Get Up Kids
Song: “Better This Way”
Album: Single

The second single from The Get Up Kids’ first release in seven years shows this punk band looking into the past for inspiration while also looking forward to the future for their new release.  
Watch: Watch:

Artist: Poppy’s Field
Song: “Laguna”
Album: Single

LA-based indie pop band Poppy’s Field released their latest single just in time for summer. Artist: Lydia
Song: “Sunlight”
Album: Single

From their upcoming album, “Sunlight” gives listeners a look at what to expect from Lydia. The track is all about  trust and human connection. This track has an experimental edge to their indie folk sound. Watch:

Artist: Sam Valdez
Song: “Farther Away”
Album: Single

From Los Angeles, singer-songwriter Sam Valdez looked to the desert for inspiration for her upcoming debut EP. Watch:

Artist: Ciaran Lavery
Song: “13”
Album: Single

Irish singer-songwriter Ciaran Lavery adds in a little Americana and folk into his sound. This song, and her blend of shoe-gaze and vintage Americana indie folk gives a glimpse of what to expect.
New Music from the Inbox for May 28, 2018: Lydia, The Get Up Kids, Terra Lightfoot, & More!

First it was Childish Gambino and “This Is America.” Now we have “This is Nigeria.”

Judging by this response video from Nigeria, you have to wonder if other countries are going to start their own similar conversations. (Via Mashable) Childish Gambino’s “This Is America” remains the most talked-about video of the year.
First it was Childish Gambino and “This Is America.” Now we have “This is Nigeria.”

There’s a hidden tribute to Gord Downie at the Hip’s recording studio

There’s a hidden tribute to Gord Downie at the Hip’s recording studio
All the guests had access to most of the grounds and the studio building himself. That footage is from that room. The room looks much like it did during those rehearsals two years ago except for one thing. In the frontman’s position is a mic stand, the same stand that was used during the last Hip show in Kingston in August 2016. If you remember the Long Time Running documentary, there were scenes early in the film where Gord and the band were starting rehearsals for the tour. Chills. Back on Thursday, I attended an event at The Bathhouse, the Tragically Hip’s recording studio west of Kingston. Sitting at the foot of that stand is a pair of Gord’s boots. There were, however, areas that were kind of off-limits. Gord’s boots: Jane Stevenson/Toronto Sun

Wow. A private area at the back–the spot where the Hip rehearsed–was roped off. Read more about the Bathhouse at The Toronto Sun.

RIP Glenn Snoddy, the inventor of the guitar fuzz pedal

That was fine for most, but a few players discovered the power and glory of distortion. When he woke up, he had the riff and two minutes of snoring. Go here for an interview with Glenn on how things worked out. The next time you hear a fuzzy guitar, say a quick thanks. The result was the first-ever fuzz pedal: the Maestro Fuzz-Tone. Many of these early experiments in fuzz were accidental, usually the result of broken speakers, electrical shorts or other ghosts in the electronics. Read his official obituary at The New York Times. Snoddy died last Monday at the age of 96 as the result of congestive heart failure. For the first dozen years of the electric guitar’s life, the emphasis was on clear, loud, pure tones. He recorded it quickly on a bedside cassette machine and immediately went back to sleep. By the end of 1965, it was nearly impossible to find any kind of fuzz pedal in stock. But then a riff came to Keith Richards in his sleep while the Stones were on tour in America. On May 10, 1965, the Stones set up at Chess Studios in Chicago and recorded  “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction.” A second session was recorded a few days later in Hollywood using a different tempo and, most crucially, with Keef’s part funneled through a Maestro Fuzz-Tone. The engineer that day was Glenn Snoddy. Such was the case in 1961 when country star Marty Robbins found his electric guitar malfunctioning during the recording of a song called “Don’t Worry.” You’ll hear it the moment it comes in. Few people bought into the Fuzz-Tone for the first couple of years. He and Marty worked on a way to dirty up a guitar in a controlled way. Marty thought this sound was pretty gnarly and began wondering if there was a way this kind of sound could not only be summoned on demand but also be regulated and modulated in some way.
RIP Glenn Snoddy, the inventor of the guitar fuzz pedal

Canada must start recognizing more of its musical heritage

There are now over 900 of them throughout London, honouring the famous men and women who at one time occupied that building or used it for some notable purpose. [My point is that we need to do the same thing in Canada. Read on to see what I propose.] I bring this up because I just returned from a tour of rock’n’roll landmarks through the English capital and it turns out there are music-related blue plaques everywhere. [This was my weekly column for GlobalNews.ca – AC]
Anyone who has walked through London, England, knows that history lurks around every corner. Sure, there are palaces, grand buildings and all manner of monuments, but if you look carefully, you’ll see blue plaques affixed to walls and structures. That’s to be expected, since the city was established by the Romans around 43 CE. The blue plaque program was started in 1866 and is now run by an organization called English Heritage. There are two main rules for having a plaque posted on a site: (1) The person being honoured must be at least 100 years old; or (2) dead. They mark places of historical interest that might otherwise be overlooked.
Canada must start recognizing more of its musical heritage

I wholeheartedly agree with this: We’re in the era of the “music explainer.”

Enter the music explainer. While there is some excellent writing that fits the form, the music explainer really shines in podcasts and videos. But given my history and what I do for a living, you’d expect me to agree with this idea of the “music explainer.” After a quarter-century of doing The Ongoing History of New Music, the rest of the world has kind of caught up. Gone are the days when listeners relied on critics for guidance on which albums to buy. Music criticism is dead. Long live music analysis. Today, there is a plethora of wonderful media focused on how music is made, and why we like what we like. In the streaming era, there is no need to read about whether an album is any good—you can sample it for yourself with just a few clicks. Now, instead of seeking out critics’ assessment of an album, many music lovers want to hear about how songs work, why albums are constructed the way they are, and other bits of musical minutiae. These explainers celebrate the creative process, break down musical theory, and otherwise highlight things that often go unnoticed to casual listeners. Here are five of the best music explainers out there right now—and a few bonus suggestions if you want to go even deeper. Must be some kind of oversight. Sadly, there doesn’t seem to be any mention of The Ongoing History on their list. Keep reading.
I wholeheartedly agree with this: We’re in the era of the “music explainer.”

After 35 years, we can finally see the official score for the THX sound

After 35 years, we can finally see the official score for the THX sound
And was it ever written down? He called his composition “Deep Note.”
The fanfare was patented. But who made those sounds? View the never-before-seen score of #DeepNote THX’s audio trademark 🔊 created by Dr. The THX sound was written by Dr. James A. Moorer a former employee of #Lucasfilm. The 30 voices begin at pitches between 200 Hz and 400 Hz and arrive at pre-selected pitches spanning three octaves by the fourth measure. In 35 yrs we have NEVER shown this! If you ever want to play it yourself, this is what you do. James “Andy” Moorer on commission from Lucasfilm. The highest pitch is slightly detuned while there are double the number of voices of the lowest two pitches. #DeepNote debuted at the premiere of #ReturnOfTheJedi on May 25th 1983 // 35yrs ago #THXLtdEntertainsAt35 #RT pic.twitter.com/9LLF6Ul17m
— THX Ltd. Cool stuff. This past week, the score for “Deep Note” was finally released. (@THX) May 25, 2018

Here’s a history of “Deep Note.”

This is the current version of “Deep Note.”

(Via NoFilmSchool.com) If you’ve been to a movie anytime since 1983, you’ve heard this. It reads:
The THX logo theme consists of 30 voices over seven measures, starting in a narrow range, 200 to 400 Hz, and slowly diverting to preselected pitches encompassing three octaves.

If you’re part of the insane cassette revival, you’ll want to read this.

If you’re part of the insane cassette revival, you’ll want to read this.
Still, there are dreamers. Fine. “We found out how cheap it was to actually manufacture a tape and just went for it,” said 42-year-old Lucas on an April afternoon at Pizza D’ Action in Little Rock. A longtime fan of audiocassettes, he and a buddy looked into getting the album on tape. If have a car younger than 2010, there’s no factory cassette player. He contacted Black Smurf via Instagram and reached an agreement with the rapper to produce 100 copies of the album on tape. Once again: cassettes are an outmoded, outdated, obsolete technology that needs to die. But what are you going to use to play your new cassettes? If not, TASCAM has a new(!!!) double cassette unit for sale. And do you really have an old Walkman or cassette machine lying around the house? “He was my favorite artist at the time, and I just really wanted to put out something physically.”
Keep reading. From the Charlotte Observer:
It was 2016 and Joey Lucas had been listening to a digital copy of an album called Hustle Warfare 3, by Memphis hip-hop artist Black Smurf. There was no physical version of the record, which bothered Lucas. He wanted a copy of Hustle Warfare 3 to call his own, a physical object he could hold and show to his friends. Read about it at New Atlas. Those prone to romanticizing and fetishizing them don’t remember (or never knew) what it was like when they were the only way to make music portable. This Little Rock AK music label’s heart is still with the cassette. “I just kind of did it for fun,” Lucas said. Good riddance.

This idiot homeopath claimed he could cure Ebola and other diseases with sound waves

This idiot homeopath claimed he could cure Ebola and other diseases with sound waves
It’s all bullshit, of course. No earbuds? (Save all the emails and phone calls. The website lists 23 ailments the recordings treat. William Edwin Gray III was selling “homoeopathic sound files” online claiming that these audio clips could cure Ebola, SARS, swine flu, typhoid, and cholera. It would cost too much money to fight and  “Frankly, I think we’d lose anyway.”
  And within just three or four hours! Many people (including me) consider homoeopathy a quack science with zero credibility in reality. From Ars Technica:
Gray claims that sound waves can carry “the energetic signal in homeopathic remedies” to treat patients. The individual recordings go for $5 a pop and users can also subscribe to receive 25 for $100. There they can “dose” themselves with the recordings to treat a variety of ailments. California-based Dr. With this method, he produced 263 “eRemedies,” which are 13-second recordings (conveniently available as either .wav or .MP3 files) said to sound like hissing. A user simply answers a series of questions about their condition and the website serves up the appropriate eRemedy. He claims to be able to collect that energy by placing vials of homeopathic remedies (like water) in electrified wire coils and recording any emitted sounds. Nothing you can say will convince me.)
This story won’t do anything to help the cause of homoeopathy any favours. Like with the whole anti-vaccine insanity, I’ve done my research. No problem. Not only is the California medical board threatening to evoke Gray’s license, but he’s decided not to contest any allegations. You could just listen over a cell phone! Patients—who are not examined or even seen by Gray—can get these “remedies” via Gray’s website, mdinyourhand.com. According to Gray, all you had to do was download these sounds, play them through earbuds and you’d be cured. He didn’t offer any evidence or reason, but still…cured!