Random music news for Friday, May 25, 2018

Another Grammy scandal is brewing. This American smuggled rock music out of the USSR. On a day just like this long, long ago–1977, to be exact–Star Wars opened in theatres. Then there’s this podcast of the underground rock scene in the Soviet Union. Want to smoke with Snoop Dogg? Now let’s move to music news for May 25, 2018. How to make it as a music journalist. Are you into synths? It’s worth the listen. Lenny Kravitz looks back in his 30 years in music. Liam Gallagher met his love child daughter for the first time. Michael Jackson’s estate is not happy about an ABC special called The Last Days of Michael Jackson. How different is Pope Francis? Go here. The value of the whole EDM scene dropped last year, including a 4.8% fall in Canada. This teen pianist is doing just fine with only four fingers. Spotify has settled one of its outstanding class action lawsuits. How Tom Wolfe changed music journalism. This is a great podcast featuring Moby. He picked Rod Stewart and his wife out of a crowd. Check out this new stackable unit. Has the EDM scene peaked? Want to know what Apple knows about you? (Via Jillian)
Here’s a good timesuck to pass the time leading up to the weekend: a talk about Bowie’s relationship to sci-fi and fantasy. Speaking of synths, we need to acknowledge the birthday of Bob Moog which happened this week. Ed Sheeran is REALLY going after scalpers by cancelling tickets. Go here. Usually, it was the other way around.
Random music news for Friday, May 25, 2018

What’s the deal with playing the national anthem before sporting events?

That’s when the practice became particularly widespread, because the new tech coincided with a huge swell in patriotism. Why is the national anthem played before a sporting event, anyway? Here’s a fascinating fact: The national anthem was played at baseball games decades before it was actually the national anthem. Over time, other sports began adopting the practice. “That was expensive, so it was only for special occasions,” like opening day. Fascinating. While most team owners have agreed to go along with the new rules, several have said they will take the fine hit because they believe their players have the right to express their opinion over police shootings of unarmed black people. Historian Marc Ferris wrote a history of the national anthem in which he points out that, at first, the anthem didn’t exactly come free. It’s no coincidence that its first surge in popularity came during wartime. Its first big moment reportedly came in 1918 during the 7th-inning stretch of the World Series. “The thing is, you had to hire a band,” he told NPR in 2016. Keep reading. What’s so special about those occasions? But let’s back up. There are records of “The Star Spangled Banner” gracing the diamond going back as far as 1897, but the song wasn’t adopted as the national anthem until 1931. It’s now NFL policy that players who want to protest do it in the locker room or somewhere off the field. Nationalism stoked by World War I meant that people were more affected by the song, and the fact that major league baseball players were being actively drafted meant those who weren’t drafted benefited from showing their patriotism. CNN takes a look at the situation in America. Ferris says that after World War II, sound systems allowed teams and parks to play the anthem sans band. If any player breaks the rule, the team will be fined. Over time, a mix of technology, war, and keeping up appearances kept the song in the sports spotlight. The biggest music story in America this week has to be the continuing kerfuffle around NFL players taking a knee during “The Star-Spangled Banner” at the start of games.
What’s the deal with playing the national anthem before sporting events?

A reader asks: “What’s the deal with radio edits?

A reader asks: “What’s the deal with radio edits?
This can range from language edits (i.e. Anything to get their song on as many radio stations as possible, you know? Songs are often tweaked in subtle (and not-so-subtle) ways so that they fit better with certain formats. Songs are sometimes made shorter so that stations can cram more songs into an hour. The second version was one without rap, i.e. I am very curious to know. Rap is still a polarizing sound with some audiences. removing or replacing bad words) to full-scale remixes to removing/adding certain bits. Is there a racist element to it somehow? In response, a non-rap version was issued to radio. I distinctly remember that the song was featured twice on the album single. How are these radio edits still a thing? Perhaps there a significant demographic of people that do not enjoy hearing rap at all and thus it must be removed from songs on certain stations? “Blurred Lines” is another good example, When the song began to cross over from pop to adult contemporary stations, many programmers felt that the rap bit sounded out of context when it came to the other songs they played. Or is it something much less nefarious? It’s all in an attempt to customize songs for specific audiences and specific radio formats
For example, “Take Me to Life” from Evanescence came in a couple of forms: one with the rap and one without. A non-rap version was issued to those stations so it fit better with their music flow. This popped into my inbox from John:
Hi Alan,
A musical question came to my head recently and you might be the one to answer it. Others have things like guitar solos removed because they’re a bit too wild-sounding for the overall sound of certain types of radio stations. But these edits aren’t restricted to removing rap bits. For the most part, artists don’t mind when these edits take place. It has little (if anything) to do with racism but instead with the way the performance is delivered. Rock stations told the label that they liked the song but were worried about the rap bits turning off rock fans. Record labels recognize that radio exposure is still the most effective way of turning a song into a hit. I can remember as a child listening to the Ghostbusters 2 soundtrack which featured the single “On Our Own” by Bobby Brown. What’s the deal with radio edited versions of songs? I also thought back to the song “Blurred Lines” from a few summers ago, where T.I.’s rap bridge was removed for some radio stations but not for others. Kind Regards,
John
A great question! Nicki’s part of the song was more or less totally removed. the rap bridge was edited out of the song. Mollified, rock stations added the song to their playlists and the song ended up become a huge hit for Amy Lee. Just as some people don’t like country, some don’t like rap. How did it start? I can remember thinking it was strange to put the same song on a cassette where the only difference was to have the rap section removed, but didn’t think much more on the matter. The question jumped into my head more recently when I heard the pop song “Bang Bang” by Jessie J, Ariana Grande and Nicki Minaj on the radio.

And the finalists for the 2018 SOCAN Songwriting Prize are…

And the finalists for the 2018 SOCAN Songwriting Prize are…
“Money” – written by Leandra Earl, Eliza Enman-McDaniel, Jordan Miller, Kylie Miller, Garrett Lee; performed by The Beaches; published by Done with Dolls Inc., Besme, administered by Kobalt Music Group Ltd. “Petite valise” – written by Émile Proulx-Cloutier; performed by Émile Proulx-Cloutier; published by Éditions de La Tribu. Every year for the past 14 years, SOCAN, Canada’s performing rights organization, holds a songwriting contest. “Magic”– written by Eoin Killeen, Timothy Law, Patrisha Sanna Campbell; performed by Birthday Boy and Trish. Pierre; performed by Casper Skulls. “Main Girl” – written by Charlotte Cardin; performed by Charlotte Cardin; published by Red Brick c/o Corico Arts. “Lingua Franca” – written by Neil Bednis, Christopher Laurignano, Fraser McClean, Melanie St. “Play the Field” – written by Josée Caron, Lucy Niles; performed by Partner; published by Partner Mus. Now the French list:

“56k” – written by Simon Trudeau Cliche, Jeff Martinez, Marc Vincent; performed by LOUD; published by Productions Silence D’Or. “Au-delà des mots” – written by Amelie Beyries, Maxime Cote; performed by Beyries; published by Beyries Mu Inc., White Turtle Pubg (David Murphy et cie). “Walkaway” – written by Jasmyn Burke, Morgan Waters; performed by Weaves. “La fin du monde” – written by Philippe Bouchard, Gabriel Desjardins; performed by Philippe Brach; published by Éditions Équispec. “Cotton Candy” – written by Jessie Reyez; performed by Jessie Reyez; published by BMG Rights Management Canada. Malette; published by Productions Nia Inc., David Murphy et cie. “Gallaway Road” – written by Maude Audet; performed by Maude Audet; published by Éditions Dare to Care. Until June 7, music fans can now listen and vote for their favourites From May 24 to June 7, 2018, music fans are encouraged to listen to and vote for their favourite song through www.socansongwritingprize.ca. “Chills” – written by James Barker, Gavin Slate, Travis Wood, Donovan Woods; performed by James Barker Band; published by Warner Chappell Music Canada, Ole Media Management LP II. Malette, Manuel Gasse; performed byAndréanne A. You can also use social media and on Twitter. or through social media, on Twitter using the hashtag #mySSPvote and identifying the performer’s name in the tweet. First, the English list. The winner will be announced the week of June 11. Dreams Tonite” – written by Alec O’Hanley, Molly Rankin; performed byAlvvays; published by Rough Trade Publishing Canada. “Tout ce vacarme” – written by Simon Beaudoin, Christian David, Antoine Dumoulin Drolet, Sebastien Jean Houle, David Lagace, Christian Renaud; performed by La Famille Ouellette; published by 9338-4642 Québec inc (Disques St-Laurent). “Primitif” – written by Emerik St-Cyr Labbé; arranged by Etienne Dupre, Eliott Bundock Durocher, David Marchand, Mandela Dalgeish Coupal; performed by Mon Doux Saigneur; published by Éditions Dare to Care. Women dominate the finalists’ list. “Ça va ça va” – written by Philémon Cimon; performed by Lou-Adriane Cassidy
“Fou” – written by Andréanne A. You’re allowed to vote once per day through each platform. “Je cours” – written by Felix Dyotte; performed by Félix Dyotte andÉvelyne Brochu; published by Coyote Records. “Healers” – written by Benjamin McCarthy, Iskwé, Ryan Somerville; performed by Iskwé. The winner will get $10,000 cash i along with a Yamaha PSR-S970 keyboard  and a $500 Gift Card from Long & McQuade.

U2’s The Joshua Tree gets written up by the Library of Congress

But it was their fifth studio album, 1987’s “The Joshua Tree,” that cemented the band iconic status. In 2013, The Joshua Tree from U2 was recognized that way. (Via Michael)
Across four studio albums, beginning with their 1980 debut, “Boy,” the Irish rock band U2 created a signature sound and built an adoring international fan base, delivering spiritual (and increasingly political) songs and live performances brimming with the irrational exuberance of youth.   A critically-acclaimed work that has sold more than 25 million copies, produced two chart-topping singles, and inspired not one but two of the highest-grossing concert tours ever, it’s become ingrained in the popular imagination–particularly in America, the country whose myths, legends, and ideals inspired its creation. In an era when popular culture gleefully celebrated unabashed materialism and professed a credo of “greed is good,” here was an album that seemed to herald asceticism as ideal. Taking its title from the hardy desert plant native to the more arid portions of the American southwest (which was itself named by early Mormon missionaries who saw in it the Old Testament image of Joshua raising his hands to the sky in prayer), “The Joshua Tree” represented all of the things most of U2’s contemporaries renounced: earnestness, austerity, and introspection. Every year, the Library of Congress designates a number of recordings as having important historical significance. Here’s the official write-up. Dutch photographer Anton Corbijn’s austere cover photos present the band’s members (singer Bono, guitarist the Edge, bassist Adam Clayton, and drummer Larry Mullen Jr.), as four modern-day sons of the Desert Fathers, casting wary eyes upon the Day-Glo fashions, big hair silliness, and conspicuous consumption that epitomized the times. Yet, at the time of its release, “The Joshua Tree” bloomed in stark contrast to the pop music landscape that surrounded it. Keep reading. The astonishing success of “The Joshua Tree” may, in retrospect, seem to have been inevitable.
U2’s The Joshua Tree gets written up by the Library of Congress

So long and thanks for all the punk: The final Vans Warped Tour

So long and thanks for all the punk: The final Vans Warped Tour
I remember vividly my first trip to Warped Tour. There’s something cathartic about wildly flailing around in a group of sweaty, shirtless metal-heads. After a successful run, Kevin Lyman announced that the 2018 Vans Warped Tour will be the last, full cross-country trip. Since 1995, Van’s has sponsored Warped Tour. I also remember having a crowd surfer thrown on my face and having my nose erupt in a torrent of blood. All dynasties eventually fall. Blood, sweat, but no tears. But this year, will be the last year to soak in Warped Tour as we’ve come to know it. That’s worth the price of admission right there. Although its first year was labeled as an alternative rock festival, it began focusing on the punk scene in 1996. I knew I liked it but had yet to experience the face-melting noise coming off the main stage set-up. There are pop-punk bands like Four Year Strong and Fenix TX, Sum 41 for anyone looking for some early 2000’s punk, some August Burns Red and Beartooth for metalcore lovers, and of course, my favourite band of all time, Every Time I Die. It has been hinted that there will be a celebration next year to commemorate the 25th year of the tour. It was the summer before grade 11. That’s how the final Warped Tour should go. In 1521, the last Aztec emperor, Cuauhtemoc, surrenders to Hernan Cortes and the final city of the Aztec empire came into control of the Spanish. Vans certainly didn’t hold out on talent for their final tour. Horns up and rock on! An event like this is all about comradery. If you want to catch the tour this year, it’ll be in Toronto on July 17th. Be happy you got the chance to go in the first place. Was it ever. Overall, 10/10 day. Anyone who’s made the trek to the tour can hear the punk influence immediately. In 476 C.E., the last of the Roman emperors, Romulus, was overthrown by the Germanic barbarian Odoacer, putting an end to the 1000 year rule of the Roman Empire. Like minded people coming together to share in something that has been a musical institution for years. A traveling rock show with stops throughout Canada and the United States where fans can mosh and crowd surf to their hearts’ content. I was a heavy rock virgin at the time. A boy never forgets his first mosh pit either. So, it was with great grief that fans of rock and roll heard this would be the last tour of the annual music dynasty known as Vans Warped Tour. Ear piercing screams and low tuned guitars flood the airwaves in the venue. I distinctly remember getting punched in the face during The Devil Wears Prada set and thinking, “Yeah okay, this could be fun”. You can mosh like nobody is watching, revel in the sweaty bliss of rock and roll, but don’t be sad it’s over. Jean shorts, tank top and backward-fitted cap seemed the best outfit.

This dude hates playing with humans, so he built a teddy bear band

This dude hates playing with humans, so he built a teddy bear band
His choice of band members is…interesting. Jay “J-Bot” Vance prefers robots to humans. There’s emotions. Rather than go through the hassle of forming a band, he just built one. “I have no problem with drugs, but some people, you know, they might act crazy when they’re on drugs.” Some people might be on drugs,” Vance told VICE News. Then again, Vance points out “There’s egos.

Let’s get caught up on the Massey Hall revitalization

Let’s get caught up on the Massey Hall revitalization
Well, with the renovations, Massey Hall will no longer be the only venue on Shuter street. Whitehorse will be the leading performance, backed up with artists like Jim Cuddy, Sarah Harmer, Buffy Saint-Marie and Sam Roberts. You’ve got a just over a month to enjoy this classic Canadian venue, so get in while you still can! Furthermore, this revitalization is assisting with the problem of small venues closing down across the city. This fits right in with the mission statement of Hart Massey: to focus on artist development and community outreach. Big venues like Massey Hall rely on smaller venues across the city as incubators for talent. Being a professional musician is hard. A grand concert venue and a huge piece of Toronto history, Massey Hall is celebrating it’s 124th anniversary this year. This is an investment in the young artists of tomorrow; up and coming bands who just need a shot to show they’ve got it. Not only will artists have a chance to play in this historic venue, but if they show promise, a spot on the main stage may be in their future. So, reaching out to a wider community is a smart move on the part of Massey Hall. Since it’s inception on June 14, 1894, it has hosted some of the world’s greatest performers like Canadian legend Gordon Lightfoot, Bob Dylan and a legendary jazz concert featuring the likes of Charlie Parker, Bud Powell and Dizzy Gillespie. Music is, and always will be, a community-based art. Small concert venues are where upcoming bands learn to thrash and flail in front of a live audience. All tickets for the event are $18.94 to commemorate the year that Massey Hall graced the public with its open doors. This is more than a renovation. Up and coming bands won’t pull in crowds of thousands, but still need a place to perform. Grooming your live performance and stage presence is paramount before moving into the big leagues. They want to offer a stage for artists of all levels. A small stage will be added in the Centuries bar in the basement and a new live music room will be installed on the fourth floor of the hall. These smaller venues, along with offering some great music, are a way for Massey Hall to ‘farm’ talent. It’s no wonder that it is hailed as one of the foremost music performance venues in the world. The big stages are reserved for the biggest performers, but the revamp of Massey Hall is in an effort to make the hall more community-oriented. After hosting so many performances, it only makes sense that it needs a face lift. The main hall will remain the pride and joy, but two smaller stages meant for less established performers are being added in. It also ensures the longevity of a legendary venue, by modernizing it to fit with the needs of the city and artists. On July 2nd, Massey Hall will be closing for two years to complete the most in depth and important revitalization in the venue’s history. To celebrate the 124th anniversary, Massey Hall is putting on an all-star alumni performance on Thursday, June 14th. Massey Hall is trying to be that place. The three nights before the closure on July 2nd, Gordon Lightfoot will be headlining the stage.

Just in time for the premiere of the new Han Solo movie comes this Star Wars-Beastie Boys mashup

There isn’t a movie trailer in the known universe that can’t be made better by using the “Sabotage” from the Beastie Boys. (Via Tom) Case in point: this recut trailer for The Empire Strikes Back.
Just in time for the premiere of the new Han Solo movie comes this Star Wars-Beastie Boys mashup

More mashup fun: Rush’s “2112” + Peanuts (the comic strip, not the legume). This. Is. AWESOME.

More mashup fun: Rush’s “2112” + Peanuts (the comic strip, not the legume). This. AWESOME. Is.
Works for me. It’s the entire thing. This mashup with the Peanuts gang only made me love it more. Read more at Exclaim! Snoopy as Geddy? This is freakin’ brilliant! My favourite Rush piece of all time is the entire first half of the 2112 album. Pigpen as Neil Peart? And this just isn’t some quick clip.

Someone has turned Kraftwerk into a sitcom

What could be funny about a Teutonic electronic act that specialized in deliberating de-humanizing music through synthesizers and robots? Dangerous Minds (via Tom) point us to what a Kraftwerk sitcom might look like. Nothing, really–but that’s the point.
Someone has turned Kraftwerk into a sitcom

For reasons unknown to all but themselves, Weezer has covered Toto’s “Rosanna”

For reasons unknown to all but themselves, Weezer has covered Toto’s “Rosanna”
Nice job, too. More than 35 years later, the song has enjoyed a major renaissance with streams exploding. Weezer fans noticed this and inexplicably began demanding that the band cover it. Back in the 80s, Toto was reviled by alt-rock types for their corporate rock-ness. Instead, Weezer decided they’d rather do “Rosanna,” another hit from the album. Over the years, though, some of their material has undergone some critical re-evaluation, especially their 1982 hit, “Africa” from Toto IV.

The Ongoing History of New Music, Episode 824: 24 Years of the Vans Warped Tour

The Ongoing History of New Music, Episode 824: 24 Years of the Vans Warped Tour
The inaugural ’91 was successful enough for Lollapalooza to try again the following year. Perry Farrell, frontman for Jane’s Addiction, put together a multi-act bill to support Jane’s on the last-ever tour. Songs heard on this episode:
Jane’s Addiction., Mountain Song (Live)
No Doubt, By the Way
Blink-182, Waiting Time
Less Than Jake, Automatic
Sugar Ray, Fly
Green Day, She (Live)
All Time Low, Time-Bomb
My Chemical Romance, I’m Not Okay (I Promise)
Billy Talent, Devil in a Midnight Mass
Weezer, Hash Pipe
Ataris, Boys of Summer
Eric Wilhite has, as usual, created a playlist to go along with everything. This time, things were expanded across multiple stages and multiple attractions. Sonic 102.9/Edmonton
The Zone/Victoria
The Fox/Vancouver
Live 105/Halifax
WAPS/WKTL The Summit/Arkon, Canton, Cleveland, Youngstown The show runs at 11 am Sunday. That’s where the real money was. It’s been around for so long that no knows for sure how many acts have played it. The caravan approach fell into disuse. This is the history of the Vans Warped Tour. Guys like Alan Freed, the pioneering DJ, and Dick Clark took all these acts on the road, playing places like theatres, county fairs and wherever they could find a booking. In many cases, there would be a common backing band that most or all of the artists would use. This, by the way, is a great option for American listeners who are prevented from listening to the show live because of geo-blocking,

We’re still looking for more affiliates in Calgary, Kamloops, Kelowna, Regina, Saskatoon, Brandon, Windsor,  Montreal, Charlottetown, Moncton, Fredericton, and St John’s and anywhere else with a transmitter. In the early days of rock–and we’re talking about the 1950s–the most efficient and cost-effective way to put acts on tour was to bundle them together as a package and put everyone out on the road together. But then along came Lollapalooza in 1991. Edgefest and the rest of them are all defunct. This package tour approach was pretty common until the late 60s when the music business was producing artists big enough to tour on their own and play arenas and stadiums. And for a while, it was all pretty cool. If you’re in any of those markets and you want the show, lemme know and I’ll see what I can do. Don’t forget that you can get the podcast version of this podcast through iTunes or wherever you get your on-demand audio. For the next couple of years, Lollapalooza was the touring music festival for the Alternative Generation. This success spawned imitators: Edgefest, Lilith Fair, Summersault, Another Roadside Attraction. But there was one traveling music festival that survived for 24 years. The net effect was very much like those old caravan tours. The economics are different now. PA equipment–such as it was back in those days–was often supplied on site. These became known as caravan tours. The Ongoing History of New Music can be heard on the following stations:

102.1 The Edge/Toronto – Sunday night at 7
Live 88-5/Ottawa
107.5 Dave-FM/Kitchener
FM96/London – Sunday night at 7, Monday night at 11
Power 97/Winnipeg (Sunday nights at 11)
Rock 97.7/Grand Prairie – Sunday nights at 6. Lollapalooza is a static festival held in Chicago every August.

The Tragically Hip held rare open house at their Bathouse Studios near Kingston. I was invited.

The Hip had a friends-and-family event last night to support their new business venture, UP Cannabis, a licensed producer of marijuana which is poised to jump into the Canadian marketplace once legalization goes through later this year. Its location is so low-key that many people in the area don’t even know it’s there. One of the live rooms. The control room is 100% analogue. One of the guys bought it in a New York City junk shop for about a hundred bucks. So they paid for it again and brought it back to the studio. The band liked it so much they turned it into an album cover. If you know where to look along Main Street in Bath, Ontario, a town just west of Kingston, you’ll see an old house set back about 100 feet from the road behind a grove of trees. That’s The Bathouse, the studio headquarters of the Tragically Hip. The studio comes with its own bicycle…

…and you’d expect some hockey sticks to be close at hand, right? The front steps leading up to the porch and the main entrance. Thanks to the Hip and UP Cannabis for a great evening. Once the band had the Fully Completely artwork commissioned (for which they paid), they found it in a gallery in California. The studio is a one of the few live/work facilities in the country where artists can come live while they make music. Dallas Green was there, too. He played some songs for us under a clear spring sky. The front grounds of The Bathouse. The place has all the facilities one might need, including a pool, a baskethall court, a fire pit, a bonfire pit (for REALLY big fires) along with a pitch’n’putt green. I was lucky enough to be there–and they let me take some pictures. This hangs on the wall just inside the entrance. Everyone in the band is a major investor in the company and offered The Bathouse and its grounds for a company gathering, which also featured select invited guests. I was told that this console was purchased from NBC and The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. As you might expect with the Hip, there’s a large library featuring some esoteric books…

…and one that I seemed to recognize. Another live room. This looks familiar.
The Tragically Hip held rare open house at their Bathouse Studios near Kingston. I was invited.

Random music news for Saturday, May 26, 2018

Let’s take a look. A sign of the times: Toronto’s NOW magazine is now looking for listener donations. Weird. And now, for music news on May 26, 2018…

Speaking of GDPR, even rock stars have been all over this. Give it a read. Is YouTube’s new streaming music service any good? Teenage Head returned to their Hamilton high school 43 years later. Here are my weekly music picks for GlobalNews.ca. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame has a new exhibit coming called Rock on TV. (BTW, Canada will get this new service sooner than you may think.)
Why would Kanye West pay $85K for a picture of Whitney Houston’s drug-strewn bathroom? NO MORE GDPR EMAILS! When it comes to its new racial sensitivity training, Starbucks will use rapper Common. Muzenly looks like a useful app for anyone who goes to music festivals. Here’s another look at how artists are illegally paying their way onto influential playlists. The new NFL policy on kneeling during the national anthem is one big clusterf**k. Very weird. Would you go over your phone if you dropped it into a porta-potty at a festival? What’s it like to stage a big Broadway musical? I gave this interview to online magazine Hard Rock Daddy. WIth Morgan Freeman running into #MeToo difficulties, Seth Rogen has offered to take his place as the voice of Vancouver Transit. But you knew that, right? This is fun: a history of storytelling through various audio formats. PLEASE! I don’t even subscribe to 75% of these newsletters! The Chinese are really good at arresting fugitives at concerts using AI. (Via Steve)
Is Spotify having some second thoughts about its “hateful content” policy? For some album artwork, of course. And speaking of apps, Starving Artist aims to connect music-makers. New AR technology: a wearable device that will allow concertgoers to mess with the audio mix.
Random music news for Saturday, May 26, 2018