Random music news for Monday, May 21, 2018

Random music news for Monday, May 21, 2018
She was actually born on May 24, by the way. This is what I have for music news for May 21, 2018. Because there’s a G7 meeting in Quebec City that same week. Bryan Adams. (Via Alexander)
If you’re into podcasting, this is a great article on the listener experience. Any guesses who was the only person to walk out of an episode of James Corden’s Carpool Karaoke? Maybe. Was this the first-ever modern rock festival? It’s a thing. Sort of. Speaking of festivals, here are the events where you’re most likely to find a hook-up. If you were ever into Sonic Youth, you need to read this. You can infer a few things about the candidates in the Ontario election by examining their campaign songs. Inspiring: A concert for Syria. Is Apple thinking about released a version of the HomePod under the Beats brand? The Church of Beyonce? Rumour: U2 plans to show up on the Plains of Abraham next month. Goth ice cream. A Korn musical? Queen Victoria has been dead since 1901, but we’re eternally grateful for this May holiday. Ed Sheeran doesn’t like the way his music is being used in Ireland. Why? It’s possible. Did Billy Idol miss an opportunity with the Royal Wedding?

New Music from the Inbox for May 21, 2018: The Jim Reynolds Band, Peach Kelli Pop, Calpurnia, & More!

New Music from the Inbox for May 21, 2018: The Jim Reynolds Band, Peach Kelli Pop, Calpurnia, & More!
I like their style of guitar-driven indie. I enjoy the punk edge to their sound. Listen:

Artist: Peach Kelli Pop
Song: “Black Magic”
Album: Single

The third single from their upcoming album, Peach Kelli Pop begin to explore new themes while still maintaining their signature colourful energy. Artist: Catlow
Song: “Scrapes”
Album: Single

From Vancouver, this five-piece alt rock group layers powerful female vocals over guitar hooks, giant synth beats, and powerful bass lines. This upbeat love song gives listeners an idea of what to expect. This song is about the effects of love. Artist: The Jim Reynolds Band
Song: “Firefly”
Album: Single

LA-based The Jim Reynold’s Band is set to release an album in July. Listen:

Artist: Russo
Song: “Lonely”
Album: Single

The debut single from LA four-piece Russo is full of energy, attitude, and sass. This track is full of energy and punk aggression. Watch:

Artist: Polish Club
Song: “Beat Up”
Album: Single

Australian soul-punk duo Polish Club plan to release their debut in August. I love their sound and look forward to what they release in the future. Watch:

Artist: Calpurnia
Song: “Greyhound”
Album: Single

Vancouver four-piece Calpurnia is getting ready to release their debut EP next month. Watch: Watch here.

Joe Strummer’s isolated vocal from “Rock the Casbah”

Joe Strummer’s isolated vocal from “Rock the Casbah”
(Via Michael)

  Having just got back from a week in London, I’ve had the Clash playing in my head. Take a listen to Joe Strummer’s isolated vocal from “Rock the Casbah” from the Combat Rock album.

Come back with me to the era of giant speakers and powerful stereos

Come back with me to the era of giant speakers and powerful stereos
Keep reading. I wanted — needed — a sound system for my room and nothing was going to stop me from getting one. [This is my weekly column for GlobalNews.ca – AC]
I still remember my first stereo system with great fondness. Despite my parents’ begging that I spend my money on something more “sensible,” I would not be deterred. Having poured over magazines like Stereo Review, brochures I got through the mail, and the annual Radio Shack catalogue, I’d finally come to terms between what I wanted and what I could afford. With $500 I earned from my first job at the soft ice cream parlour/pool hall in my small town, I begged my dad to take my 14-year-old self into Winnipeg to buy a stereo for my room. I’d worked for it and I’d have it. That Saturday in June, we went to Krazy Kelly’s in the west end of Winnipeg where I picked out a Sansui 221 integrated receiver (with a whopping 12 watts RMS) for $249.99, an Akai APC-001 turntable ($99.95) and a couple of no-name full-range bookshelf speakers ($124.99).

The tech of U2’s Songs of Experience tour

The tech of U2’s Songs of Experience tour
GeekWire.com gets into the guts of the matter. The crew, which includes 90 people traveling with the band and another 120 locals, can set it all up in 10 hours and break it down in four. It is probably an unintentional irony that “Experience + Innocence” begins with another Bono injury projected on the band’s most high-tech screen to date. Open a U2 app on your phone, point it at the screen and the MRI image turns into a melting iceberg, with water gushing out — a metaphor for consciousness, the band says. When U2 hits the road, it’s not just a matter of loading up some instruments and a PA in a van. Once it’s packed up, the set travels to the next gig in 27  53-foot semis. As audience members poured into The Forum, the LED screen glowed with a purple, alien-looking image: a close up of Bono’s MRI from the incident. Read the entire article here. Things are substantially more complicated than that. It’s the first hint that the night may well become wonderfully strange. And when the production goes overseas later this year, the gear will travel in 37 ocean containers or four 747 freighters. Bono wrote portions of the “Songs of Experience” album after suffering a yet-unspecified near-death experience.

This was inevitable: Discussions of Spotify’s “hateful conduct policy” turns to race

Where does Spotify draw the line when it comes to de-playlisting artists accused of hateful things? “For them to be judge and jury is a very dangerous thing.”
While many music industry executives say streaming services are well within their rights to curate their homepages and playlists as they see fit — and without explanation — it’s Spotify’s creation of an official policy nearly impossible to apply fairly that has drawn the outrage. Keep reading. Kelly or XXXTentacion (all acts who have run afoul of #MeToo standards and accused and not necessarily convicted of felonies), enter their name into search and all their music will come up. “Spotify’s got to realize that these are innocent people by court of law,” says one label executive close to a recently de-playlisted artist. We need to watch how this develops. Shaunna Thomas, executive director of women’s advocacy group Ultraviolet, publicly called for the service to also de-playlist artists like Chris Brown, Eminem, Red Hot Chili Peppers and Nelly, among others. Spotify is not removing this music from the platform nor is it censoring it. This can only get weirder and more complicated. “How many artists on the white side [is this happening to]?” asks one major-label branding executive. In statements, reps for both XXXTentacion and Kelly ­questioned why other artists, many of them white, were not also ­de-playlisted despite facing similar ­accusations and, in some cases, ­convictions. Jim Gordon, the drummer for Derek & The Dominos, for example, was denied bail for a 10th time in April, having served 35 years of a life sentence for killing his mother in 1983 — but “Layla,” on which he performed and co-wrote, appears on several Spotify playlists. You bet.   Spotify’s new public hate content and hateful conduct policy, which states that the company will now use its editorial privileges to refrain from promoting music it feels is inappropriate, is now in the crosshairs of people who believe that black artists are being unfairly targeted. It doesn’t take long for any contentious issue to be viewed through the lens of race, especially in the United States. If you want, say, something from Chris Brown or R. The music will just no longer promote the music by including it on the playlists it creates. From Billboard:
Several high-ranking Spotify ­executives were blindsided by the policy themselves and upset that the teams who interface with acts and labels weren’t consulted, while concern has mounted both inside and outside the ­streaming ­service that the policy initially ­targeted artists of color. “We can go down the list and note all the disgusting things that they have done but they seem to still have access.”
Slippery slope?
This was inevitable: Discussions of Spotify’s “hateful conduct policy” turns to race

Random music news for Tuesday, May 22, 2018

I like it. A promising 3D audio headphone company has gone out of business. How many do you believe? This could be the cheekiest name for a radio contest ever. This South African musician has sued EVERYONE for copyright infringement. A street in Detroit has been named after Michael Jackson. The Pussycat Dolls are suing because The Daily Mail suggested they were a “prostitution ring.”
Microsoft’s Cortana assistant is about to get smarter. Got four hours? This article clears up a lot of misunderstandings. How much do you know about secondary ticket seller StubHub? Kanye has just released a documentary. But maybe not. Now some music news for May 22, 2018. Conventional wisdom says that Mozart was an alcoholic. Interesting: Collectively, indie labels are bigger than any major label. This guy is worried about Rush’s Neil Peart contributing to deforestation because all the drumsticks he uses. And now some actual jailhouse rock. It looks like it. How many of these radio station myths have you heard? Schmooze, the elder English bull terrier, had her tenth birthday yesterday. The Arctic Monkeys have the fastest-selling vinyl record in the UK in 25 years. Can you buy your way onto Apple’s podcast charts? And I do mean EVERYONE. Here’s what happens when you let AI write a script for Game of Thrones. (Via Tom) She still thinks she’s a puppy, which is fine by me. Relax, dude: Rush has retired.
Random music news for Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Looking for casual sex at a music festival? Here’s the info you need.

Here’s the info you need. Looking for casual sex at a music festival?
Just so you’re aware, the most common form of hook-up was oral sex with 46% of those in the survey saying that’s what they got/gave. But 9.4% were willing to give up all dignity and do it in a porta-pottie. Now that we’re past the May long weekend, our thoughts turn to going to music festivals and what may happen when we go through the gates. The survey also says that just over 50% at any given festival is open to a casual hook-up. A tent, naturally. According to a survey by a site called TickPick.com, one-third of all festival goers have had sex while at a music festival. And the top locations on site? Ew. (Via DMN)

New book goes through the Clash discography album by album and song by song

Parts of Sandanista! The weird digital sample heard in “Rock the Casbah” is actually a clip of the “Dixie” alarm from Mick Jones’ watch. were recorded in New York in the same studio complex at the same time the Rolling Stones were recording Emotional Rescue. The Clash hasn’t existed since sometime in the mid-80s—they kind of just evaporated instead of formally breaking up—they are still acknowledged as one of the most important bands in the history of all rock’n’roll. Canadian author Martin Popoff (who has written at least a hundred books on music) goes through the entire Clash discography song by song offering stories and details about all of them. The book is out today (May 22). The book also features hundreds of pictures of the band throughout their career. For example:

I never realized that when Joe Strummer shouts about “yellowy eyes” in “London Calling,” he’s referring to the time he came down with hepatitis in February 78. There must have been some interesting encounters in the hallways. If you want to take a deep dive into the group, there’s a new book called The Clash: All the Albums, All the Songs (Voyager Press). If you’re into the Clash, punk, and rock in general, there is a lot you can learn here.
New book goes through the Clash discography album by album and song by song

Could we be on the cusp of an emo revival?

As Generation Y–the Millennial generation–came of age musically, many gravitated towards emo, with its messages of unhappiness, loneliness, self-absorption, and alienation. Racism. Thirty Seconds to Mars is in the middle of a great run. There was a time in the mid-00’s when alt-rock was almost nothing but emo. The Twin Towers attack brought the boom times of the late 90s/early 00’s to an abrupt end, taking the happy pop of the era (think Britney, Backstreet, ‘NSYNC, etc.) down with it. LGBTQ issues. Jimmy Eat World has a new record planned after a big summer tour. We’re already seeing a shift in the mood of music. Gen Z has a lot to be concerned about, too. Mean Girls, a rite of passage movie for so many, is now a Broadway musical. Not only is today’s network TV starting to look a lot like it did 15-20 years ago (reboots of Will & Grace, Roseanne, and Murphy Brown are with us), but the fear, uncertainty, and doubt created by the Trump administration (including its foreign policy or lack thereof) is starting to feel a lot like the dark days of George W. Meanwhile, there’s a huge cohort of young people–Generation Z, those born from the middle 90s to the middle oughts–are in a position to change the culture. The falsehoods of weapons of mass destruction led to neverending wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. #MeToo and #TimesUp. George W.  
  By 2005, everything seemed emo: My Chemical Romance, Dashboard Confessional, Jimmy Eat World, Panic! If you were around back then, you’ll remember those years as a time of great confusion. Study after study shows that pop is getting both slower and sadder. What started as an intense form of hardcore punk in the DC area back in the 80s had evolved into a post-9/11 cry for help. Funny how 2018 is starting to feel a lot like 2003. Gun violence. It might not be that much of a leap before Gen Z grabs guitars and starts wailing about their fears just like their older brothers and sisters did. The Trumpocracy. Bush, reviled by many for stealing the 2000 election from Al Gore, created even more distrust in government. At the Disco, and Bright Eyes were everywhere while just about every song that soundtracked The OC came from some emo band. Dashboard Confessional is back with their first album in nine years.
Could we be on the cusp of an emo revival?

Manchester marks the one-year anniversary of the concert bombing

Ariana Grande tweeted this. thinking of you all today and every day 🐝 I love you with all of me and am sending you all of the light and warmth I have to offer on this challenging day
— Ariana Grande (@ArianaGrande) May 22, 2018

This is the front page of The Manchester Evening News. It was a year ago today that 22 people were killed as they left an Ariana Grande concert at the Manchester Arena. pic.twitter.com/8CCp8Vwf5B
— Andy Burnham (@AndyBurnhamGM) May 22, 2018

Read more here. The UK had a national minute of silence at 2:30 pm that followed a memorial at the Manchester Cathedral. Today we come together, we remember each of the 22 people whose lives were taken & we re-commit to supporting their families & all affected.
Manchester marks the one-year anniversary of the concert bombing

This old cassette machine plays digital music. It’s a cool way to fake out your friends.

It’s a cool way to fake out your friends. This old cassette machine plays digital music.
He’ll build one for you, too, starting at $320 USD. A few years later, we were all burning perfect digital copies of our music on CD-Rs. But some–like Artur Mlynarz of Poland–never surrendered. DAT tape technology was relegated to professional use and never caught on with consumers. No biggie, though. There was a competing technology known as Digital Compact Cassette (DCC). Unlike DAT, it used a standard-sized cassette and could also play old-school analogue tapes.   More info here. But it was driven to extinction for the same reasons that killed DAT. He fiddles with old cassette machines, turning them into (semi-)modern digital players. The first, Digitial Audio Tape (DAT) was sunk under pressure by the music industry because they realized the machines could make perfect digital copies, threatening the recorded music market. There were a couple of attempts to bring cassette technology into the digital era.

What was it like to go music shopping at HMV in 1985? This.

All the pictures can be seen here. Retronaut has these pictures of an HMV in Bristol in the UK c.1985. Record stores were glorious places 30 years ago.  
  It didn’t stop there, though. Some stores still stocked 8-tracks while most outlets had at least a small section dedicated to this new thing called the compact disc. While most of the space was dedicated to vinyl, it was under serious pressure from pre-recorded cassettes, sales of which exploded after the introduction of Walkman and Walkman-like personal audio players.
This. What was it like to go music shopping at HMV in 1985?

Trent Reznor has unilaterally redefined the concept of the EP

Trent Reznor has unilaterally redefined the concept of the EP
Meanwhile, Trent Reznor has thrown another spanner into the definition. In America, the RIAA defined an EP has a release containing three to five songs OR a release with a running time of less than 30 minutes. EPs feel less important in today’s music-isn’t-as-important-as-it-once-was world. Let’s not even get into the concept of mini-LPs or double EPs. EPs show up with singles in Spotify and other streaming services = they get lost easier. That’s for another time when tequila is present. Back in the late 70s, a new format was introduced. The EP (Extended Play) was a 12-inch slab of vinyl that slotted itself right between the 7-inch single (two songs) and the 12-inch LP (up to 40 minutes per side). The album will be out June 22. There it is, then. Or Ramones albums that are done after 29 minutes. Was a three-track Oasis CD a single with two bonus tracks or a short EP? And at six songs, it’s just too short. The album contains more than the five songs required under several definitions. We’re not charging any more for it so why get worked up about it? But Trent actually has a point. Or records like Mike Oldfield’s Tubular Bells album which features just two songs that have a total runtime of 47 minutes. The Grammys don’t even talk about EPs. That loose definition became a formal one when organizations like the Official Chart Company of the UK needed a way to classify these releases. In the CD era, things got a little more complicated. E
EPs featured somewhere between three and six songs–shorter than an album but substantially longer than a single–and had a total running time of less than 25 minutes. This is from a thread at EchoingTheSound.com
Want to know why it’s being labelled an LP instead of an EP? It also has a running time of over 30 minutes–barely, but it qualifies. Trent also had this to say to a naysayer:
Quantum550: suck my entire cock. He has declared that the upcoming Nine Inch Nails release, Bad Witch, is in his eyes, an album even though it has just six songs and a running time of 30:11. But then we have the Grammys, which says that any release with five or more songs–different songs–that run for 15 minutes or more is an album. This has annoyed some people who maintain that Bad Witch doesn’t fit the definition of an album and should be classified as an EP. After all, isn’t this the third release in a triptych of EPs that began with Not the Actual Events in December 2016? What about a disc with four songs? There’s another reason why Trent wants this to be classified as an album.  
 
  Why make it easier to ignore?

Alice Cooper – You And All Of Your Friends lyrics

One, two, three, four

We’re burnin’ down your city
The message has been sent
Angels without pity
We hold you in contempt

And this is how it all ends
For you and all of your friends

It’s righteous conflagration
It’s our way of payin’ you back
For plunderin’ our nation
Paintin’ heaven black

So this is where it all ends
For you and all of your friends

And when the sun goes down tomorrow
We will no longer be your slaves
And it will be the end of sorrow
‘Cause we’ll be dancing on your graves

‘Cause this is where it all ends
It’s too late to make amends
For you and all of your friends