Random music news for Monday, April 30, 2018

Random music news for Monday, April 30, 2018
If you’re a fan of Dear Rouge, you’re gonna like this. Can classic wartime songs help patients with dementia? Facebook may soon have us talking into our arms. Now for some music news for April 30, 2018. Here’s why. Friday, it was “Ye vs. This should be fun to watch. The two are made for each other. Why Avicii’s death should be a wake-up call to the industry. I’d read this. Ask your kid if they know what a “floppy disc” is. This Ed Sheeran puppet will make you cry. Maybe. A glove that Prince wore during the Purple Rain tour has just sold for big money. Donald Trump is thinking of inviting Kanye to the White House for dinner. That tribute concert for the Humboldt Broncos was held in Saskatoon Friday night. The People.” Then it became “Kimye vs. Want to see what happens inside your mouth when we talk? Chris Martin, surfer. Bob Dylan-brand whiskey? A runaway bison in Manitoba has inspired a song. Yep. (Via Tom)
Porn for drummers. If they do, they’re doing better than most kids at identifying old technologies. Snoop Dogg.”
Twenty One Pilots fans think they’ve uncovered a big secret about the band’s next album. Great. Another way our cell phones are going to kill us. One of the co-founders of the Burning Man Festival has died at the age of 70,

 
BONUS: Tom found this comic book. MRI magic! Here’s a report. Green Day fans want to push “American Idiot” to #1 on the chars in time for Trump’s visit in July. It’s the last day of April–or as some people in parts of the country where spring is late call it, January 120th. Bieber has $11 million US to spend on a house like this and we don’t. It’s pretty, er, complex, too.

New Music from the Inbox for April 30, 2018: Middle Kids, Ennor, Orouni, & More!

New Music from the Inbox for April 30, 2018: Middle Kids, Ennor, Orouni, & More!
This song evokes duality and confrontation with intricate harmonizations and song structure. It sounds uplifting and makes the listener want to get up and dance. Listen:

Artist: Orouni
Song: “Nora (Naked)”
Album: Single

French artist Orouni found inspiration for this song after reading the play A Doll’s House. This song reflects on climate change with rich harmonics and imagery. Watch: Watch:

Artist: Marty Casey
Song: “Anything You Want”
Album: Single

Marty Casey’s latest single is filled with intense energy. Listen:

Artist: Ennor
Song: “Wave After Wave”
Album: Single

Cornwall, England-based band Ennor has gained attention in the UK for their nostalgic blend of folk and rock. This dream-pop single evokes feelings of frustration with someone unable to communicate feelings. The single is upbeat and high tempo J-Pop mixed with Scandi-Pop  and traditional singer-songwriter influences. Watch:

Artist: Maison book girl
Song: “Bath Room”
Album: Single

J-Pop idol band Maison book girl is currently gearing up for their first performances in the UK. Artist: Middle Kids
Song: “Bought It”
Album: Single

From their upcoming full-length debut, Aussie trio Middle Kids gives listeners an idea of what to expect. Watch:

Artist: Hatchie
Song: “Sleep”
Album: Single

From Brisbane, Australia, singer-songwriter Hatchie is set to release her debut EP in May. It starts out vulnerable and builds to a cacophony of sound.

A well-constructed defense of the compact disc

No internet required. No problem
Open deck. No problem
Open deck. No internet required. Insert disc. Press play. “The connection was cutting in and out, the volume was doing all kinds of strange things, and after awhile I just kind of got fed up and I said: ‘you know what, why don’t I just pull out one of my David Bowie CDs?’,” he explains. I’m always nervous about the streaming services and things being pulled off.”
Keep reading. No WiFi? It sounded pretty glorious and I thought, ‘why are CDs suddenly the worst thing ever invented by mankind?’” Browne says. “It was easy. “His death made me sad, but it also made me want to hear a lot of his music again. It sounded pretty glorious and I thought, ‘why are CDs suddenly the worst thing ever invented by mankind?’” Browne says. So I called up one of my streaming services to hear the Low album,” he recalls. “It’s interesting that people hate them so much right now.”
The beauty of CDs, he explains, lies within the reliability of the physical disc. He rediscovered the value of compact discs over streaming. Not to mention improved sound quality. “It was easy. Insert disc. That was always my fear. Not to mention improved sound quality. While I almost never listen to any of them–I’m too busy rediscovered my vinyl collection–I can’t ever see getting rid of that collection. It was in that moment that streaming technology failed Browne. Press play. It’s crammed with maybe 10,000 compact discs dating back to sometime around 1986. This article from CBC Radio articulates why. The death of David Bowie provoked an epiphany for Rolling Stone editor David Browne. “What if your hard drive screws up? No WiFi? I have a room off my office I call the CD Vault.
A well-constructed defense of the compact disc

Someone has built Gilfoyle’s Napalm Death bitcoin alert

If you watch HBO’s Silicon Valley (and you really, really should), a recent episode featured a bit where Gilfoyle created an audio bitcoin alert triggered when the crypto fell below a certain level. An agency has built an actual real-life version of that alert. Sindri Guðmundsson from Viska explained that his company watches Silicon Valley as a weekly event while a season is airing and that the team built the tool “just for fun.” The Viska team wrote a simple Javascript plugin that fetches the price of bitcoin from Coincap.io, then built the site off WordPress, all within three hours. From The Verge. Now all a user will need to completely imitate Gilfoyle is an actual mining rig at home to toggle on and off remotely. Anyone mining out there? The alert was Napalm Death’s 1987 classic, “You Suffer,” a track that lasts exactly 1.36 seconds. Cool. Now, an Icelandic website design agency called Viska has created a web version ofGilfoyle’s death metal alert — which is just as startling as promised. In case you missed any of that, it goes like this.
Someone has built Gilfoyle’s Napalm Death bitcoin alert

A solution to a problem no one has: An app that makes your MP3s sound like they’re playing on cassette

Want to hear what your music sounds like on premium chromium oxide tape or one of those cassettes that you bought in bulk? Click on the image to get started. A site called WebCassette will accept your MP3s and degrade them to the level of old-school cassette listening. But then again, maybe it’ll make you appreciate how far technologic has come. Why anyone would want to willingly degrade MP3s–which sound crap to begin with–to the level of shitty late 70s/early 80s cassette audio is beyond me. Up until now, the only way to experience this substandard way of listening to music, the only way was to troll eBay for vintage cassette players. Need a cassette player with a crappy motor that doesn’t keep to a constant speed? You can even adjust the controls to make your pristine digital files sound worse. As far as I’m concerned, it’s the technological equivalent of the outhouse. Yes, the Walkman was a revolutionary device, but that was 1979. We should move on. It’s all here for you. I’ll say it again: anyone who is nostalgic for the cassette wasn’t around when it was the only way to make your music portable. But not anymore. If you must. The vile cassette: an outdated technology that needs to die forever. We do NOT need to go back to that era.   Yet there are some poor people who pine for the days of the Sony Walkman and the glories of listening to music riddled with tape hiss. How about a machine with cheap playback heads.
A solution to a problem no one has: An app that makes your MP3s sound like they’re playing on cassette

ABBA is reuniting for two songs but won’t tour. Here’s how much money they’re leaving on the table.

Here’s how much money they’re leaving on the table. ABBA is reuniting for two songs but won’t tour.
What will we get? They’ll look and sound just like they did in the 70s, which is how they want to be remembered. And maybe it’s not out of the question yet. Then we have the Mamma Mia movie and musical, neither of which is going anytime soon. No live performances, no tour. This will not happen, though. A tour of their holographic avatars in 2019. And thanks to the proliferation of Adult HIts radio stations, airplay is as strong as ever. The last estimate I saw suggested that the group could make £1.6 billion or about $2.8 billion CAD. ABBA was like the Beatles in that they refused any and all offers to reunite. Next to the Beatles, ABBA has probably sold more records than anyone. Naturally, this has led to more calls for a tour. No tour or live performances, but this will still be the first thing ABBA has done together in 35 years. And forget about that rumour about headlining Glastonbury. Because they broke up before we started getting proper SoundScan sales numbers. Three BILLION for a reunion tour. The upper estimate is 500 million. Can you imagine the ticket prices? How many times have you heard “Dancing Queen” in the last month? They just didn’t see the point–even though at one point in the 90s, they were offered ONE BILLION DOLLARS to get back together and tour. And can you imagine how the crowd would lose its collective mind when they launched into “Dancing Queen?”
This would have been the biggest reunion tour the universe has ever seen. This isn’t normally anything I’d talk about, but the idea of ABBA getting back together is unusual, to say the least. A business partner says that ABBA will do the two songs and that’s it. You can bet that companies like Live Nation and AEG are on their knees, crawling towards Sweden to plead with them. That technology didn’t come along until the 90s, so all we have are estimates. (We have a clearer version of Beatles sales because of all the reissues, repackages, collections and box sets.)
On the low end, ABBA sold at least 100 million records. But then last week, they surprised everyone with an announcement that they are going to release two new songs (a “melancholic ballad” called “I Still Have Faith in You” and an uptempo song entitled “Don’t Shut Me Down”) later this year.

Weekly Survey: What was your most memorable record store experience?

Maybe it was an encounter with a clerk that was good or bad. Not bad. Or maybe you know of a regular who was something of a weirdo? 2001) across from Maple Leaf Gardens. Share your record store experiences below. Shit. This got me thinking about the Olden Days–i.e. This brings me to this week’s weekly survey question: What was the most memorable experience you ever had in a record store? I loved the ritual abuse I got at Toronto’s Record Peddler on College (d. Shit. Customers developed relationships with the employees, trading tips, recommendations and even arguing over what was worth buying. The goal of any shopping excursion was to get the approval of the surly prick at the cash. After a period where it looked like the record store was headed for extinction, indie shops have made a comeback, largely on the back of the vinyl resurrection. Shit. pre-Internet–when a visit to the local record shop was as important as a trip to the grocery or liquor store. Shit. Maybe someone warned you about one record and then steered you towards one that was brilliant. Still want all these?”
Sound familiar? When I presented my picks at the counter, a typical exchange went like this as the clerk flipped through my stack of vinyl: “Shit. In fact, people in the industry tell me that this year’s Record Store Day was the best-ever. Perhaps you met someone in the aisles.   Good choice. Shit.
Weekly Survey: What was your most memorable record store experience?

Random music news for Tuesday, May 1, 2018

Random music news for Tuesday, May 1, 2018
Noise-canceling…windows? No, Green Day is not breaking up. a year ago: Total albums, -24.1%; CDs, -23.9%; physical albums, -24.2%, digital tracks, -20.2%; vinyl, +59.3% (Yay, Record Store Day), streaming, +49.2%. If we were to follow the traditions of the ancients, we really should have today off. The early 80s version of Fishbone is reuniting and going on tour. Soulja Boy and his dragon dildos. Yes, this has to do with music–in a way, at least. And speaking of Gabriel, remember that boombox scene in Say Anything? So does this mean an announcement of a proper Guns ‘N Roses reunion that includes Izzy, Steve and Matt? Remember the yodelling boy of Walmart? LG is promising a new mobile phone speaker that should be twice as loud as what we have today. You read that correctly. Would you go to a church that conducts a Beyonce mass? This phone setup could make you more mindful. This is what’s making news on May 1, 2018. It almost didn’t happen. Tell me more. Why we should continue to be worried about the results of the “Blurred Lines” copyright infringement case. Peter Gabriel’s wife beat cancer using a new form of stem cell therapy. Here’s a nice history of the earliest days of REM. The death of the car. The future of drumming(?)
This could be interesting: a drama about the record industry. Canadian music sales last week vs. Apple is working on a high-res VR and AR headset. Not only did he perform at Coachella, but he’s now got a record deal. Don’t play your dog this way.

A three-decade U2 streak is about to come to an end

When the tour begins in Tulsa tomorrow, they will break a streak that has run 28 years, 5 months and 14 days. There will not be a performance of “Where the Streets Have No Name.” One. Since that give, they have played “Where the Streets Have No Name” for every single show since then. Make sense, given that they recently wrapped a full tour of almost nothing but those songs. This is a streak that started November 18, 1989, when they performed at the Entertainment Centre in Sydney, Australia. Let’s put that in perspective. According to Michael (he’s plugged into these things), U2 will NOT play any Joshua Tree songs on the upcoming Songs of Experience tour. Every.
A three-decade U2 streak is about to come to an end

This guy wanted to stage a concert along the DMZ between the two Koreas. Here’s what happened.

South Korean violinist Hyungjoon Won wanted to stage a concert along the DMZ to commemorated the 70th anniversary of his country’s independence. The demilitarized zone between North and South Koreas is the most heavily fortified border on earth. (Via The Atlantic) And with the Korean War officially still on–it’s a very scary place. (Trust me: I’ve visited it.)
But with the leaders of the two countries getting along famously these days, there’s hope that this madness is going to finally end. The result is this short film.
Here’s what happened. This guy wanted to stage a concert along the DMZ between the two Koreas.

How big of a music force is YouTube? Bigger than you can imagine.

What I can tell you is that when it comes to music, YouTube is huge. Or maybe not. Spotify is a mere gnat when compared to YouTube. The figure is based on research from Ipsos from 2017 that gauged internet use of people predominantly aged 16-64 in 13 of the globe’s leading music markets, including the US, UK, Germany, Japan and Sweden. We’ll see. Other video platforms, such as Vevo and Vimeo, were responsible for the remaining 9% of listening hours, according to the report. YouTube is the most dominant streaming platform in the worldwide music business. Google is scheduled to unveil something next week–I’ve been invited to a super-secret one-on-one meeting–which could end up being an announcement of the amalgamation of Google’s music services. Keep reading. Combined, then, audio streaming platforms were responsible for 45% of all listening – one percent behind YouTube’s estimated haul. (The research excluded China on the grounds that ‘IFPI is not aware of published figures for music users’ in the territory.)
Paid (subscription) audio platforms claimed 23% of total listening, according to the IFPI, with free audio streaming on 22%. I mean, freakin’ unbelievable massive. According to estimates published in the IFPI’s Global Music Report, the video streaming platform attracted 46% of all music streaming listening time around the world last year (excluding China). This is from Music Business Worldwide. Codenamed “YouTube Remix,” it’s said to bring YouTube, YouTube Red, Google Play Music and whatever other music services they have (Who can keep track?) under one roof.
Bigger than you can imagine. How big of a music force is YouTube?

Probably unnecessary, but fun for Star Wars fans

Probably unnecessary, but fun for Star Wars fans
Some Star Wars fan with much too much time on his/ hands has created a house music mix using nothing but sound effects from the movies. A solution to a problem that didn’t exist, but okay…

When spring finally comes, here’s a list of different driving songs where you’ll want to roll down the window

With one of the most abhorrent and bone chilling winters in a while finally behind us, we can experience, once again, that little mystical feeling of rolling down the car windows and blasting some tunes. But forget about the lyrics and focus on the gritty vocal style, ferocious guitar solo and thrashing drums. [Thomas Dennett likes lists. Faith Cola by Sisters Euclid
Angels & Airwaves – Young London
A rock anthem like no other, this song just screams good vibes. And considering the song is about cars it seems fitting. James Hetfield Oooh’s, Yeah’s and Unnhh’s his way through this fast paced but undeniably groovy tune. It’ll have you screaming hell yeah while driving at 120 in no time. Faith Cola – Kevin Breit and Sisters Euclid
Enter Sister’s Euclid, the funky Jazz quartet who I had to privilege to see live at the Millpond in Alliston, ON, as their loud and distorted rock influenced jazz sent old couples fleeing in horror, plugging their ears all the way. The opening line “Give me fuel, give me fire, give me that which I desire…” is actually a recipe for a pretty violent case of incomplete combustion in real life, but is the perfect way to start off this hard hitting song. From their 2008 album, Light It Up, this song is best known for being the theme song for the television show Blue Mountain State. This song is the soundtrack for the breeze that blows your hair back when the windows are down. – AC]
It’s an overstated but honest saying; it’s the little things in life. A funky four piece never sounded so good. The song opens with some frantic guitar tapping over a blasting drum beat. No vocals, but it’s a fast paced and feel good song, with one of the catchiest chorus guitar hooks I’ve ever heard. I’ll admit, it’s a little bit of a, what I like to call, “dude rock” song; lyrics and visuals of loosely dressed women in fast muscle cars. Here’s hoping these songs will be a perfect pairing for any open window road trip you take. So if that doesn’t entice you to listen nothing will. Fuel – Metallica
Appearing on Metallica’s 7th album, Reload, Fuel is a headbanger that’s a great way to start off any road trip. This is one of them. Oh, and the lyrics are about a guy turning into a werewolf. Nothing like some chugging guitar and double kick to really set the pace for a drive. But this song really is a perfect fit for highway driving, ideally one with a high speed limit. Hell Yeah – Rev Theory
Okay no more songs about cars and fuel and the such after this. I promise. Wolf Like Me – TV On the Radio
Released on the 2006 album, Return to Cookie Mountain, this song is a little more straightforward than some of the other alt-rock tunes this band is known for. However, I’d posit that is fits much better for a high octane rip down the highway than for a football team filled with hormonal young men. Off of the 2010 album LOVE, the former front man of Blink-182, Tom DeLonge, brings his signature pop-punk vocal style to this alt-rock tune. It’s sometimes hard to put into words the feelings that a song convey, but every time I put this song on I get an overwhelming sense of freedom. Faith Cola, off the 2007 album of the same name, isn’t like the other songs on this list. The whole song has a comforting reverb effect that permeates through every instrument, and despite the softer sound when compared to a band like Metallica, the song is no less high energy. Not to mention lead guitarist Kevin Breit shreds the slide guitar like nobody’s business. Driven by a steady drum beat, and some eerily comforting guitar tones, this song is a foot tapper (but please don’t tap the gas pedal, it’s extremely bad for your car). The uplifting lyrics are juxtaposed with the fast-paced instrumentals and thrashing cymbals.
When spring finally comes, here’s a list of different driving songs where you’ll want to roll down the window

Are there negative effects of Record Store Day? Now that you asked…

Some argue online that it less and less worth it to hit the store hours they open Is there really a need for a reissue of Jack Douglas’ “Kung Fu Fighting”? Or for vinyl releases of CDs that are still in print? Indie bands rely on vinyl releases to make a living in an era when streaming can literally pay one penny per thousand or more listens. Even some record store owners were getting in on this action, despite the pleas of some of the artists to desist. Admittedly, RSD releases are nearly all limited in number. By the mid-2000s, vinyl album sales were in a pronounced slump. However, this has come at a price. Ten years later, it has become a global event but one that arguably endangers the existence of the grassroots culture that birthed it in the first place. They may be getting in on this after-market because RSD is becoming an increasingly dodgy economic proposition given the amount of releases distributors are pushing on retailers. It begs the question, however, if Justin Bieber fans are more likely to go out of their way to buy a physical product that they may not be able to play, or if they would rather stream his latest album instead. Not all these closings were of small indie stores, but the rise of popularity in streaming and other non-physical media led to many to wonder if the record store was on its way to becoming a relic. Not many know that these records, which have a reputation for flying off the shelf, are actually non-returnable if they are not sold. However, the medium appears to be back for good. [A post from Cameron, a contributor to The Singer’s Corner, which is a great place to learn, refresh, and delve into the music world. Alas, RSD has brought with it some negative effects. Record Store Day began as a partially grassroots effort to drive consumers into record stores by offering them limited-edition vinyl records sold on a selected April Saturday. Where there has always been a notable presence of genuine collectables in the bins on every RSD, some claim that items of questionable worth have become much too common. More than a few retailers have complained that buying for RSD has become a huge roll of the dice. In any given year, it is common for bands or labels to release new material such as demos or remixes that their fans have clamored for or a special one-off single recorded expressly for RSD. For one, it seems that by the year there is a growing glut of vinyl releases that no consumer wants. To put this event in perspective, Rolling Stone reported in March 2009 that record stores had closed at historic highs in the previous five years, from 5515 open in 2003 to 2805 open in 2008. This resurgence is not entirely due to the booming popularity of Record Store Day but it seems to have played a role in popularizing vinyl and the record store. Whether you want to learn a new approach to singing, give you tips to make you better, and teach you ways to be the best of the best.- AC]
Record Store Day has been observed since 2008 by a growing number of independent retailers. These critics claim that few genuinely desire such records. There must be an audience for these releases. Newer pressing plants are slowly coming online, but at present the demand for vinyl outstrips the supply, in part due to the success of RSD in reminding consumers that records can be a quality medium. Then, supply and demand rears its head. These included albums by mainstream bands and smaller indie bands alike. They are pushed on retailers at the expense of both genuine rarities as well as releases by smaller bands that could use the exposure and sales. Yet, by 2013, news reports heralding the return of vinyl and the specialty record shop had almost become a cliché. Record Store Day can mitigate its negative effects but returning to the original concepts that birthed it: independent music and shops, small press runs, and a grassroots commitment to authenticity. In the first year of Record Store Day, there were but ten limited-edition vinyl releases available in the shops. The latter are, after all, the types of release that made RSD a unique event in the first place. Initially, this event featured a relatively small amount of special releases and there was an air of celebrating the fading indie record emporium. Most agree that vinyl will never be the multi-million seller it was in its 1970s heyday. The discs also have to be pressed at already overburdened pressing plants. For example, fewer than a million vinyl records were manufactured in the U.S in 2006. They either have records flying out the door or they have to sit on merchandise that never sells. The irony is that these bands may be a victim of the success of RSD, as major labels are are booking the few vinyl pressing plants left months in advance in order to have stock available on RSD. In 2018, the release schedule had ballooned to over 500 releases of varying interest. The records make real money for the bands and especially for those selling them on tour. It was not long before such releases were getting “flipped” on eBay and online record store websites at a hefty markup due to their rarity.
Are there negative effects of Record Store Day? Now that you asked…