Random music news for Thursday, April 12, 2018

Read this. Some people are blaming a form of hip-hop called UK drill. Yes, Nazis. As for music news on April 12, 2018…

This guy says he robbed a bank just to impress Taylor Swift. Turns out it was just a bunch of rock fans having a party. Ew. Mariah Carey is talking about her battle with bipolar disorder. There’s an uptick in violent crime in London, England. Iron Maiden has some new Eddie masks. And she’s detailing with Nazis. Spotify might end up tweaking its free service on April 24. What might that involve? Time to start getting ready for Halloween. WhatsApp is being used to virginity tests in India. Looking to get your music on Spotify playlists? I had no idea there was such a thing as “vagina pants.” Did you? Gwen Stefani. Wait–what? And no points for guessing on which date it opens this month. A Cheech and Chong museum exhibit? There’s now a Coachella emoji. Cops in the UK were tipped off about a “death cult” on an island. Yep. Tay-Tay is still with an intruder at her home in Beverly Hills. These headphones wash out ear wax. The first ever space shuttle launch–Columbia and STS-1–happened on this day in 1981. The latest person to get a Las Vegas residency?  
Random music news for Thursday, April 12, 2018

New Music From The Inbox: Lowell, Freedon Fry, Maps & Atlases, and More!

New Music From The Inbox: Lowell, Freedon Fry, Maps & Atlases, and More!
Fall Apart is catchy and accessible, but just eccentric enough to keep you on your toes. Watch/Listen:

Artist: Sampson
Song: Damned
Album: Dark Sky Night
This simple synth-pop track has the absolute coolest vocal melodies from beginning to end. This talented singer/actress also shows off her amazing art style in the super cool self-animated lyric video! Artist: Lowell
Song: War Face
Album: Lone Wolf
Lowell is ready to go to war on her latest track and you’re going to want to be on her side. Listen:

Artist: Freedom Fry
Song: Classic
Album: Classic
Freedom Fry’s new song is the sonic equivalent of going on a summer adventure: warm, fun, unpredictable, and unforgettable. Listen:

Artist: Brittany Campbell
Song: My Garden
Album: Stay Gold
My Garden is luminous and inviting with its bright arpeggiated synths, great guitar rhythms, and soulful vocals. Heavy beats, hand claps, and bold vocals give it a ferocious energy that can’t be ignored. According to Sampson it’s about “feeling stuck, and having choices to make that all bear consequences,” which may explain why it makes me want to just roll the windows down and drive through the night. Watch/Listen:

Artist: Maps & Atlases
Song: Fall Apart
Album: Lightlessness is Nothing New
Maps & Atlases are back after a six year break with music that sounds as fresh as it is. This gritty pop-rock track sounds like an instant hit. The bright and fun sound masks some darkness in the lyrics which find frontman Dave Davison dealing with the loss of his father. Listen:

Which tech company do people trust the least? Hint: Its name begins with “F”

Which tech company do people trust the least? Hint: Its name begins with “F”
Hey, Zuck: You’ve got a problem here.   The winner? In fact, it wasn’t even close. The tech site Recode conducted a survey in hopes of determining which tech company inspires the least amount of trust. Facebook.

Someone has mashed up Pink Floyd’s entire The Wall album with The Simpsons

However as Skinner kept on repeating the same moments for eternity, he soon felt isolated and started building his own aurora around him, trapped away but overprotected by his mother Agnes. I quote:
Many years after the events of The Steamed Side Of The Ham, after Skinners luncheon was eclipsed by the northern lights, Skinner found himself stuck in an infinite luncheon which was a time loop. You figure it out. In this epic-length look at The Wall–a sequel to The Steamed Side of the Ham–characters from The Simpsons once again figure prominently. Steamed Floyd makes a living re-imagining Pink Floyd albums. I, uh… Wait. Now where does, wish you were steamed and steamed animals fit into this.. Thanks to Brent for the link. Let’s start at the beginning. That’s word for word. I think. Well those are different stories for different albums.
Someone has mashed up Pink Floyd’s entire The Wall album with The Simpsons

Your weird Throwback Thursday music video for the week

You remember, right? Band Aid and Live Aid. Thanks–I think. Danny dug this out for us. Northern Lights. Back in the 80s, it was fashionable for musicians to get together to create a charity single in an effort to change the world. “We Are the World.” But did you know about Swedish Metal Aid from 1985?
Your weird Throwback Thursday music video for the week

This is the worst song in the world. By design.

This is the worst song in the world. By design.
What’s frightening is that this track sounds an awful lot like mainstream pop-rock of the 1980s. And if this isn’t enough for you, there’ s a French version. There are plenty of terrible songs, but this group actually set out to write, record and perform the worst song ever. Thirty years ago, this would have been a hit.

If you’re into electronic music, pause for a moment to remember David Mullaney

(The first synth hit was a single entitled “The Minotaur” by Dicy Hyman in 1969.)
Compare Hot Butter to the Gershon Kingsley version

For many people–me included–“Popcorn” was my first-ever exposure to electronic music. Let’s skip to a track called “Popcorn,” which was originally recorded by Gershon Kingsley in 1969 for an album entitled Music to Moog By.  
  At the end of the 60s, synthesizers were insanely big, tremendously complicated, terribly expensive contraptions. This pop single became the gateway for people to discover Kraftwerk, Emerson, Lake and Palmer, Jean-Michel Jarre and so many others. Mullaney/Scott’s next project was an all-synth project called Hot Butter. Helping him was Stan Free, a member of The First Moog Quintet, which recorded a cover of “Popcorn” in 1971. After playing in a number of jazz bands, Mullaney discovered the Beatles and decided to put down the squeezebox. And despite all this complexity, they were very limited in what they could do. No wonder their use was restricted to universities and high-end recording studios. Hot Butter’s version which was only the second pure synth song to chart in North America, reaching #2 in Canada, #5 in the UK and #9 in the US. By 1969, he was working as a performer himself under the name Christopher Scott and experimenting with the new synthesizers. Mullaney died this week at the age of 86. He rose to the position of vice-president at Laurie Records where he worked in the studio with acts like Melanie, the Royal Guardsmen and Dion. There was a second Hot Butter album called More Hot Butter. That same year, he released synth-based album called Switched On Bacharach, a collection of Burt Bacharach songs arranged for one of these new synthesizer beasts. Mullaney then embarked on a career as an award-winning arranger for TV, movies and commercials. In 1988, he became the station manager at WKJF in Cadillac, Michigan. Again, this was the stuff of science fiction. David Mullaney may have started out as a jazz accordion player, but that didn’t stop him from changing the world of electronic music. This sort of thing was considered avant-garde, futuristic and even scientific. Hell, your smartphone has more power and memory than one of these things. Hot Butter’s 1972 self-titled album featured a re-recording of the song.
If you’re into electronic music, pause for a moment to remember David Mullaney