A side effect of the vinyl revolution: Good used records are in short supply

A side effect of the vinyl revolution: Good used records are in short supply
Back in Black from AC/DC. But for more than $20 a record, I could afford to add about one new record to my collection every few months. Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours. Seems mundane, right? This is from The Daily Californian. The records they keep wanting to buy aren’t what you might expect. They want the classics, but they don’t want to spend money on expensive reissues.”
Turns out that the vinyl revival has created a chronic shortage of these albums. This is a great read. Keep going. Every once in a while, I have a couple of vinyl experts comb through my music collection to help keep it a manageable size. “These are the records young people want to buy.   And it’s getting worse. Used records, on the other hand, were what I could take risks on. I can no longer take risks on my vinyl purchases, the way I did as a freshman when I bought Led Zeppelin for $7.95 based on its iconic cover triggering my cultural knowledge that it was a piece of music I should listen to. Led Zeppelin IV. But then the used records started disappearing altogether. I didn’t know if I’d even like the band, but at the very least I had the invitation to take a chance on it. Trip after trip to the stores, I would come away empty-handed, because where there used to be predominantly used records and a spattering of new prints, now there were only ever $30 versions of albums released decades ago. In short, I got priced out of collecting records — at least locally.