And the Top-Grossing Artist of 2017 Is…

…U2. Coldplay finished in third spot ($238 million), followed by Bruno Mars ($200.1 million) and Metallica ($158.2 million). Over 50 shows in 30 cities, U2 sold 2.71 million tickets and grossed about $316 million USD, according to Pollstar. Here’s the full list. In second spot is Guns ‘N Roses with $295.5 million USD as the result of selling 2.68 million tickets. No real surprise there, given the huge crowds they attracted to their Joshua Tree 30 tour, which included a multi-night stand in Brazil that attracted somewhere around 300,000 people.
And the Top-Grossing Artist of 2017 Is…

Random Music News for Saturday, December 30, 2017

This photographer has a thing about going to gigs and taking pictures of performers’ shoes. Any suggestions you have should go to alan@alancross.ca. Not really music-related (except for the first one) but these real-life signs posted by employees are just too good not to pass on. Here are some of the big names hitting the road. Billy Joel was one of the names written in for the Alabama Senate election. For some strange reason, these dolphins sing and chant like mice. Note to self: Publish some music-related New Year’s resolutions tomorrow. This is the story of how a high school student figured out how Apple was slowing down older iPhones. (Via FF)
Mariah Carey sure won’t be missing soundcheck in TImes Square this year. This new technology can charge your gadget from up to 80 feet away. See? And now, some music news for December 30. LG has just announced their smart speaker. Why would you put a cell phone up there? Matchbox Twenty’s tour manager has died. This list details 16 weird things that were shoved into human bodies that shouldn’t have. Here’s a list of drugs they take in Iron Maiden. The rich are not like you and I. This could be the best story about Santa Claus this year. The rise of “skunk.” Wait–what? So who’s going on tour in 2018? Ringo Starr now has his knighthood.
Random Music News for Saturday, December 30, 2017

Pearl Jam’s Original Drummer Shows Up on the 2017 Fan Club Xmas Single

The A-side is a version of “Alive” recorded at that same soundcheck. The Ten Club’s gift this year features a cover of “Round and Round” by Chuck Berry on the B-side, a recording made during rehearsals for the RnRHoF induction. Dave Krusen, the drummer we hear on Pearl Jam’s Ten album and then was quickly estranged from the band until their 2017 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction, turned up again on the group’s most recent Christmas single. Now can someone please post both recordings on YouTube?
Pearl Jam’s Original Drummer Shows Up on the 2017 Fan Club Xmas Single

Does the Rise of Streaming Mean the End of Record Collecting?

Does the Rise of Streaming Mean the End of Record Collecting?
The net result is that we’re collecting less but more carefully and judiciously. The e-commerce retailer is thus far alone with this step, as both Google and Apple still offer similar music lockers. Variety looks at the impact of streaming on record collecting. What The Wife once considering hoarding has now softened into an understanding of collecting. Otherwise, we’ll move on. There will always be knobs like me who insist on acquiring and owning certain LPs, singles and CDs. Amazon previously allowed consumers to upload up to 250 MP3s for free, but announced this past week that it was ending this program effective immediately. Amazon, the company that has made billions selling you tons of stuff, would like you to stop hoarding … digital music, that is. Instead, we use streaming to audition those new tracks and albums. No. However, I and my record-collecting friends have seen our collecting habits change. However, considering the bigger picture, it’s easy to see Amazon’s decision not as an outlier, but a sign of things to come. And there’s simply no room for your 10,000 meticulously tagged MP3s in a world of an always-available 40 million songs. Consumers who have paid the company to upload up to 250,000 songs will be able to keep using it until their subscription expires, with the last plans scheduled to be phased out in January of 2019. But there will definitely be a reduction in the number of people who, like me, measure their music collection by the number of linear feet it requires. We used to buy a ton of music sight-unseen, by being attracted to the artwork, by the reputation of the label or on the basis of some review we read somewhere. If we really, really like what we hear, we’ll buy it. Music collections, long the cornerstone of a fan-based music business, are slowly being replaced by music consumption. Keep reading. The company made as much clear when it recently announced the phase-out of its cloud music locker, which had allowed consumers to upload their own MP3s and then stream them to phones, Echo speakers, and other connected devices. We’ve become more persnickety about what pieces of plastic we’ll purchase.

The Ongoing History of New Music, Encore Presentation: Music Questions That Almost No One Seems to Ask

I think you’ll agree with me when I say that these are questions should probably have some answers. New shows go up every Wednesday. And are there answers to these questions? After discussing important stuff like this with some friends, I got to thinking: can we find the same sorts of unasked questions in the world of music? For the podcast version of the show, subscribe to the Ongoing History feed at iTunes. And (3) what do dogs dream about when they twitch in their sleep? If you’re in any of those markets and you want the show, lemme know and I’ll see what I can do. Why doesn’t Tarzan have a beard? (2) Who really killed JFK? But there are plenty of questions we don’t ask that we probably should. WAPS/WKTL The Summit/Arkon, Canton, Cleveland, Youngstown

We’re still looking for more affiliates in Calgary, Kamloops, Kelowna, Regina, Saskatoon, Brandon, Windsor,  Montreal, Charlottetown, Moncton, Fredericton, and St John’s and anywhere else with a transmitter. Turns out we can. You’re welcome.)
Songs heard on this week’s show:
Collective Soul, Why (Part 2)
Nirvana, In Bloom
Sex Pistols, Anarchy in the UK (Denmark Street demo)
Suzanne Vega, Tom’s Diner
Roll the Tanks, Record Players
Front 242, Headhunter
Power Station, Get It On
RHCP, Suck My Kiss (Live)
Nickelback, Rockstar

Official playlistist (and we’re pretending that’s a real word) Eric Wilhite provides this. Sonic 102.9/Edmonton
The Zone/Victoria
The Fox/Vancouver
Live 105/Halifax
NEW! That ability to question things around to learn why things are the way they are pushes us forward. This is stuff we should be curious about. Let’s find out. And how about this: what’s the size of a fart? (Oh, and if you must know, the volume occupied by a fart ranges between the size of a bottle of nail polish and a soft drink can. The Ongoing History of New Music can be heard on the following stations:

102.1 The Edge/Toronto – Sunday night at 7
Live 88-5/Ottawa
107.5 Dave-FM/Kitchener
FM96/London – Sunday night at 7, Monday night at 11
The Drive/Kingston
Power 97/Winnipeg (Sunday nights at 11)
98.1 The Bridge/Lethbridge – Saturday night at 6, Sunday morning at 10am
Rock 97.7/Grand Prairie – Sunday nights at 6. I think one of the greatest gifts humans have is a sense of curiosity. Here are my three favourite questions that I think everyone should ask: (1) Are we alone in the universe? For example:

When a prisoner about to be executed by lethal injection, why does the doctor swab the IV site with alcohol first?
The Ongoing History of New Music, Encore Presentation: Music Questions That Almost No One Seems to Ask

In Defence of Bono’s Remark About Music Going “Girly”

In Defence of Bono’s Remark About Music Going “Girly”
Like many people, I first read about his remarks to Rolling Stone about being “girly” from other media outlets. He believes that a rock & roll revolution is around the corner. Hip-hop has. But if you replace “girly” with “soft,” “poppy,” “weak,” “overproduced,” or “fluffy,” Bono’s position becomes clear: music has been in a soft, poppy cycle for quite some time, something that I’ve been complaining about for almost two years. Bad. When you’re in conversation with him, his concentration is intense, which has the effect of making you believe you are the only person in the universe that he cares about at that moment. But probably not, since offense and outrage make for better headlines and more clicks. It will return. And my reaction was maybe the same as yours “What? The use of “girly” is unfortunate for another reason: it leaves the impression that women aren’t/can’t be as angry as men and therefore unable/unwilling to express themselves through music. If your issue is with his use of the word “girly,” I get it. Let’s review what was actually said. Go back and read what Bono said. And there are some good things about that, but hip-hop is the only place for young male anger at the moment – and that’s not good. People Are Sharing This Open Letter To Bono: “Dear Bono, Go Jump In A Lake. Pushback is warranted. Then, the artist who will make you sign up is actually more valuable … artists that have a connection with you and your life, you pay for the subscription service. Elijah [his son]  is in a band, and he has got very strong feelings about music, but he doesn’t make any distinction between, let’s say, the Who and the Killers. Or, you know, Nirvana and Royal Blood. But if you look at the entire quote and look beyond the outrage on the Intertubes, you’ll see that many took Bono’s words somewhat out of context and didn’t focus on the bigger message. Eddie has that rage. He has to be one of the best Irish gabbers of all time, quick with witty observations and often eloquent powers far beyond most mortals. The band is always listening to music, and I have got my kids. If you’re a young male, the most testosterone-ridden era of a man’s life, rock hasn’t been your vehicle for venting your anger, rage and energy. Good. You’re going to get some stick for that.”
People spent the days since the interview’s publication being most annoyed with him and has resulted in quite the backlash. Of the many people I’ve interviewed over the decades, my favourite subject has always been Bono. Bono does come off as sexist, dismissive and machoer-than-thou. Eve [another daughter] is hip-hop. But in this case, put those feelings on hold and focus on what he was actually trying to say: That rock needs to get angry again–made angry by practitioners of both sexes and all persuasions–if it’s ever going to once again become any kind of cultural force that can rival all other genres. And at a time of the year when website traffic is at its slowest and music news is hard to come by, that’s where the web will go. That’s not like you to make such a quotable faux pas. And use of the word “girly” was certainly–ahem–ill-advised. The moment something becomes preserved, it is fucking over. Women, especially, have had an issue with this particuar descriptor. And he will happily talk with you until someone (often literally, in my experience) drags him away to his next appointment. Do you believe it? When I was 16, I had a lot of anger in me. And outside of a few bands over the last couple of years–Foo Fighters, Muse, Royal Blood, Death from Above and a handful of others–rock has been dominated by the pop end of the genre combined with an introspective woe-is-me attitude (cf. It’s a teenage crush, but in a year’s time you won’t care about that. Jordan [one of Bono’s daughters] is a music snob, an indie snob. And therefore you think that there is space still available…. He might as well have used words like “feminization” or even “pussification,” for that matter. It’s dominated by frequency of plays, but that is not actually a measure of the weight of an artist … If you are a teenager and you are listening to whatever the pop act is, you’re probably listening to them 100 times a day. How do you discover new music? You might as well put it in formaldehyde. Some great rock & roll tends to have that, which is why the Who were such a great band. That, it goes without further explanation, is total horseshit and requires no further comment. If not for the “girly” clunker, we might be talking about that part of the interview. Bad Bono. the whingeing of Twenty One Pilots’ “Stressed Out” or The Lumineers’ “Ophelia”), the down-tempo, minor-key sort of stuff we got from Hosier et al over the last five or six years or the alt-rock fallout wrought by Mumford & Sons’ banjos. Yes, you might have issues with Bono and his continuous pontificating, wishing that he’d just shut up and go away. […]
When you move from an ad-based model to a subscription model, a funny thing happens. It is the sound and what he is experiencing. Lost in all that outrage is this from the interview:
[Streaming] is very, very young, and it’s very, very pop. You need to find a place for it and for guitars, whether it is with a drum machine – I don’t care. Or Pearl Jam. Rage is at the heart of it. It is not generational for him. I think music has gotten very girly. There’s no defense for a man so good with words to be that tone-deaf.  
  Just Google “Bono girly” and watch what comes up. That’s a bit…socially incorrect, lad. Signed, EVERYONE.” #Bono pic.twitter.com/1oyWX5L6yi
— Clickbait Robot (@clickbaitrobot) December 28, 2017

Yes, the use of the word “girly” was uncharacteristically ham-handed and, well, dumb. In the end, what is rock & roll?

The World’s First Musical Refrigerator Appeared in 1974!

After my Air Canada flight was canceled Saturday night, I returned to my parents’ house where I was forced to watch the Game Show Channel–their house, their rules–which was showing a vintage episode (c.1974) of Let’s Make a Deal. Who knew? If you’re looking for a new refrigerator, you can choose from a variety of manufacturers that offer “smart” appliances–Internet-connected fridges that can do everything from keeping an inventory of what’s inside to streaming music.   The Big Deal of the Day (behind Door #1, in case you’re wondering) featured, among other things, a selection of Frigidaire appliances which included this music fridge with a built-in cassette player.
The World’s First Musical Refrigerator Appeared in 1974!

Guest Post: Pirating Video Content Is Sleezy, Not a Badge of Honour

If every search engine/social media service – Google, MS, Facebook, Mozilla, and others around the globe – simply said their algorithms didn’t understand those search requests, the sites would simply gather dust. Specifics help, but specifics don’t change the way that everyone is vulnerable.  Why care? After all:
-Piracy only hurts big business
-Authors already have plenty of money
-Digital content is too expensive
-Everyone else is doing it
-We live in a different country and don’t get the movies/shows until months later
 Or, a simple Google search gives you a ton of rationalizations. Every site, computer and server would have an IP (Internet protocol) address that is unique to that device, any online device.  
A few years ago (may still be), they went a little overboard by dragging people they identified as pirates into court, suing the kid and his innocent bystander parents with ruthless abandon.  
That’s a pretty sick way of measuring interest and popularity. It won’t be long and AMPAS (Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences) will be hosting the Academy Awards with a lavish, expensive production that will run way too long, be filled with glowing/boring speeches and surprise almost no one. Right! Don’t know about you; but to me, that’s serious money. Of course, studios and networks have come up with all types of protection devices – DMA (digital rights management), encryption, end-to-end protection, you name it. The total is probably much higher because studios seem to have a squirrelly way of accounting for expenses, profits, losses but still…
And it’s not just movies. As Mobley said, “When it gets down to it, everyone’s the same. The 100-year-old facility is in the heart of Hollywood and has been the home of film industry icons like Charlie Chaplin, Douglas Fairbanks, Mary Pickford and 100s more, including some of TV shows you see today. This guest post from Andy points out that no one should be pirating this stuff. They love something. Academy members will have voted/selected the winners, but the real measure of a film’s success will be how many copies were stolen, streamed and viewed by folks. That attracted more content owners and distributors into the pool to get their share of the money or to survive as the industry shifted from traditional day/time TV to anytime, anywhere viewing. All of that luscious OTT (over the top) content is tempting to entrepreneurs who see a way to make a quick buck or two and people who like to drink a Pepsi in the middle of the store because it tastes better when you steal it. Millions of people around the globe liked having access to brilliant new video content and they signed up with Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu and others. Besides, with the Golden Globes and the Academy Awards coming up, there’s so much video that we need to catch up on. Government agencies everywhere seem to take a laissez faire approach to this content theft. [It’s cold, so we’re staying inside. That’s the people pirates steal from. They’re probably impossible for governments to “shut down” because creative folks can move the content from servers in one country to another; sorta’ like trying to squish a blob of mercury. They fear something.  
 In other words, exciting, creative, video stories have been done by Indies and 80-plus percent of it still comes from them today. They want something. Yes, we brought it on ourselves. Later, I read an online report from ABI Research that video piracy cost the M&E (media & entertainment) industry an estimated $10B last year. The only thing those perfect protection tools seem to do is give the pirate a new challenge to master … and they do. Instead of a staff of shooters, audio folks, boom people, runners, Eps, DPs, you name it; they have a core group of money people/managers. For example, the IPO (Intellectual Property Office) of Singapore explained, “Copyright infringement is not so much about a device or technology as it is about whether that device or technology is used in a manner that is illegal. After all, “everyone” knows if you can’t find it on the Internet, it really doesn’t exist! Users of such devices should therefore ensure that they are accessing content from authorized content providers.”

The boxes are one thing, but IMO the worst offenders (enablers) are Torrent sites around the web that specialize in pirated video for one and all. My approach seems a whole lot simpler. lots
– I’m not into eating my lunch while shopping from all of the “free sample” stations around the warehouse
But on a recent trip, I noticed an empty Pepsi bottle tucked back in one of the racks; and all I could think was “really?”
The store had water fountains everywhere and a snack bar where you can buy almost anything you want to eat/drink and yes, they sold Pepsi. The real creative work is done by independent specialists – 10s of thousands of men/women sorta’ like you – except that they want to tell video/audio stories. Did it really taste better because the individual stole from Costco? But it isn’t! Technologists developed the free Internet and made it available to everyone with a connectable device. -AC]
 
“The world is a dangerous place, Elliott, not because of those who do evil, but because of those who look on and do nothing.” – Mr. Paywalls went up and organizations started to monetize the video content with subscriptions, pay-for-view and ad support. The producers, sellers and some government officials say the boxes are legal for streaming stuff like YouTube, Facebook Watch and similar services–even though people tend to gravitate to streaming pirated content. Not some monolith that cranks out bottle after bottle of sugared water. Companies rushed to put up free content, stuff and folks liked free. What really caught my eye though was an old Tecart Studios poster
 
 More importantly, note the text box in the lower left.  
Of course, your mobile service provider is already rubbing their collective hands together cooking up new ways to charge you for using their bandwidth while telling you you’re getting free data service. In almost every corner of the globe, you can purchase legitimate set-top boxes that let you illegally stream movies, TV shows and sporting events. Which side is public opinion going to take – a faceless, mindless, heartless association or some dumb*** kid and his parents who were struggling to make house payments and put food on the table? Once Reid and company became successful – and a pain in the TV establishment’s backside – Netflix SVOD (subscription video on demand) and others jumped on board with their streaming services and it’s gotten more pervasive. It just changes the way that we access those vulnerabilities.” The studio system was dismantled years ago. But that’s just a different creative accounting issue. It’s sorta’, kinda’ working because Cisco reported that 80 percent of the Internet traffic is video; while Ericsson forecast that video will make up 75 percent of the mobile traffic – 14TB/month this year up to 110EB/month in 2023. Robot, “Anonymous Content” (2015)
 I’m not a big fan of shopping at Costco – one of the buy-in-bulk stores in the U.S. In other words, it’s a victimless crime. – because:
-We don’t have anywhere to store that much toilet paper–you buy in 50 lb. They were within their rights, but it was really dumb. I was reminded of the fact when I visited the history-rich studio, Raleigh Studios, during the annual DCS (Digital Cinema Society) Post Expo. The RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America) has been fighting piracy ever since content went digital.
Guest Post: Pirating Video Content Is Sleezy, Not a Badge of Honour

“The Lost Art of Being a Music Snob”

Snobs derive enormous pleasure from lording their rarefied taste over the great unwashed. We music snobs just can’t help believe that we’re more knowledgeable, have bigger music libraries, wisely curate our collections and are just, you know, smarter and more refined when it comes to anything to do with music. Keep reading. This has all changed, of course, with the paradigm shift toward music streaming. And the good stuff took some searching. You agree with this statement: High Fidelity is a documentary. I count myself among the proud snoboisie, a dedicated follower of the things no one else followed. Having been exposed to so much music for so long, I (and since you’re visiting this site and reading this, probably you), have this smug sense that I hear music better and therefore understand it more than the average person. Spotify and the like, with their songs numbering in the tens of millions, are making obscurantism obsolete, and what, I ask you, is the fun in that? Although I’ve grown slightly–ever so slightly–more tolerant as I age, I confess to retaining much of my annoying music snob habits and attitudes. And there are no more odious snobs than music snobs, at least as they existed prior to the advent of streaming services such as Spotify. In short, we (and it’s okay to admit that you’re part of this clique) are insufferable pains in the ass who occasionally deserve a punch in the throat. Is your spouse always complaining about the size of your music collection? A record collection of rare British imports and good Dylan bootlegs was a mark of refinement and connoisseurship. (BONUS: Have you ever moved house because of the size of your music collection?)
Have you berated someone mercilessly because they maintained “MP3s sound fine”? However, as this article from Saturday’s Globe and Mail points out, our kind may on the verge of some kind of extinction event. You, too, could be a music snob if you answer “yes” to the following questions:

Do you visit at least one record store when you’re on vacation? Have you ever found yourself short of breath and faint upon discovering a coveted long-lost record/CD
Do you find yourself reading Pitchfork and screaming “YOU DON’T KNOW SHIT!” at your computer screen? Do you get into arguments with record store clerks and other attendees at record shows?
“The Lost Art of Being a Music Snob”

What Would Happen if You Strung 100 Guitar Pedals Together?

A couple of guys at Reverb.com decided to answer ancient question: What would it sound like if you connecting 100 guitar pedals together and turned them all on?
What Would Happen if You Strung 100 Guitar Pedals Together?

In Praise of the DJ

In Praise of the DJ
Add to that the skepticism, if not outright hostility, much of our society shows toward the notions of expertise and hard-won knowledge. If you’ve ever found yourself losing your mind in a dance club or at a festival, you may have glanced over to the DJ booth and uttered a little prayer for the guy or girl with the skillz to take the crowd to the heights of ecstasy. Like the entitled partygoer who demands Lil Pump’s “Gucci Gang” when the D.J. New software and hardware tools allow the neophyte to deploy a base version of skills that take decades to perfect. were merely a flesh-and-blood iPod to poke and prod. Or the promoters who figure that, if you can get any old robot with an iTunes account to play whatever’s charting on the radio, why pay for specialness? That’s because, for the art of D.J.ing, technology has been as much of a disrupter as it has been a boon. Keep reading. is on an entirely different musical planet, as if a D.J. We’ve also seen the nurturing of an entire generation for whom music is an à la carte experience. If you’re lucky you’ll be dancing to an honest-to-God disc jockey — not to someone’s Spotify playlist or the musings of the latest demi-celebrities to fancy themselves party conductors. On New Year’s Eve, you’ll be dancing, one hopes. This article from the New York Times praises the life-saving properties of the DJ. What this means is that people treat D.J.s as if they’re disposable. A real D.J. Many people claim the title but far fewer embody it. is part shaman, part tech-wizard, part crowd psychologist, all artist.

Why the Hell is Everyone Singing “Auld Lang Syne” Tonight? (BONUS: A Brand New Death Metal Version!)

Everyone’s done it: the clock strikes midnight on New Year’s Eve and everyone launches into “Auld Lang Syne,” a global tradition, which, by the way, was ushered in by Canadian Guy Lombardo. What does the song even try to say? Should auld acquaintance be forgot
And days of auld lang syne
For auld lang syne, my dear
For auld lang syne
We’ll take a cup of kindness yet
For auld lang syne
The first thing you should know is that “auld lang syne” means “For the sake of old times.” Second, let’s go to The Telegraph for more. Should auld acquaintance be forgot
And never brought to mind? Should auld acquaintance be forgot
And days of auld lang syne
For auld lang syne, my dear
For auld lang syne
We’ll take a cup of kindness yet
For auld lang syne
Should auld acquaintance be forgot
And never brought to mind? Once you’re done, try this melodic death metal version of the song. First, let’s look at the lyrics.   Instead, he was the first person to write down a much older Scottish folk song. In 1788 he sent a copy of the song to his friend, Mrs Agnes Dunlop, exclaiming: “There is more of the fire of native genius in it than in half a dozen of modern English Bacchanalians!” Five years later he sent it to James Johnson, who was compiling a book of old Scottish songs, The Scottish Musical Museum, with an explanation: “The following song, an old song, of the olden times, and which has never been in print, nor even in manuscript until I took it down from an old man.”
Keep reading. The Scottish Bard wrote many wonderful pieces of original verse, but this was not among them. But why is this song from the 1950s (based on a Robbie Burns poem from 1788) the official song of New Year’s?
Why the Hell is Everyone Singing “Auld Lang Syne” Tonight? (BONUS: A Brand New Death Metal Version!)

Random Music News for Monday, January 1, 2018

Random Music News for Monday, January 1, 2018
Tis the season of fresh starts and New Year’s resolutions! A David Bowie book club? This is rare: An artist who defends Spotify’s royalty payouts. Ah! Here’s why you never, ever let your parents buy you concert tickets. Bobdylanology: The petty French thief that was an inspiration to Zimmy. Too soon. A film drama set in Paris against a backdrop of the Bataclan massacre has been postponed. Apple has filed a patent for a content-streaming system is it looks to take on Netflix, Hulu and the rest of them. Or Nigerian. Sounds like a good idea to me. There will be more than a touch of KISS at the NHL Winter Classic. And, of course, the music news will just keep coming. Totally missed this story on Bono’s annual Xmas busking in Dublin. This is another take on Apple’s intentional slowing of older iPhones. These were the biggest tech fails of 2017. The people behind the Hard Rock properties are planning to build the world’s largest guitar-shaped building. This Nigerian prince scammer is definitely not a prince. A brand new year! It’s not cheap. Adele is looking at a place in London. Broken Social Scene’s Kevin Drew has this to say about his friend Gord Downie. Were these 12 albums what the world needed in 2017? Here’s what you need to know for January 1, 2018.

New Music from the Inbox for January 1, 2018: They Might Be Giants, The Great Escape, Delta Deep, & More!

Watch:

Artist: Chris Dave and The Drumhedz
Song: “Dat Feelin’” (feat. Listen:

Artist: Tragul
Song: “The Tree of Life”
Album: Single

This powerful, symphonic metal song is about hope. Listen:

Artist: The Great Escape
Song: “Season of Love”
Album: Single

The holidays are over, but this cheery song is great to keep in mind for next year. Artist: They Might Be Giants
Song: “Last Wave”
Album: I Like Fun

They Might Be Giants offers an upbeat track with some underlying darkness. Watch: Watch:

Artist: Late Sea
Song: “The Sound of Silence” (Simon & Garfunkel cover)
Album: The Winter’s Trilogy EP

A dark and lyrical reimagining of the Simon & Garfunkel hit. SiR)
Album: Chris Dave and The Drumhedz

From Chris Dave and The Drumhedz’s self-titled debut out later this month, this song is a catchy, groovy tune. Watch:

Artist: Delta Deep
Song: “Bless These Blues”
Album: Single

Bluesy and soulful, this Delta Deep song goes back to the roots of rock n’ roll.
New Music from the Inbox for January 1, 2018: They Might Be Giants, The Great Escape, Delta Deep, & More!

New Year’s Eve Musical Resolutions and Revolutions from Writer Brent Chittenden

I’ll admit, I’ve been surprised at Walmart has been carrying as I was astounded seeing the new greatest hits package from Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds on their rack not to mention Goat Whore, neither of which I ever thought I’d see the day of seeing them in Walmart but my primary source is Sunrise. I’ve been following these guys for a while and I’ve got to say, probably my current favorite metal band. Due to my eclectic tastes and the general area I live in, I have two choices for new releases: Walmart and Sunrise Records. That’s part of why I ended up writing the 52 albums column for the past year. I don’t usually do New Years Resolutions but I do tend to reflect a great amount this time of year. Go in once a week or every two weeks. On that note, all my best to you and yours in the new year. Weirdly, my album buying is going to start to mirror how I buy comic books. With that in mind, here are my musical New Years Resolutions. 1) Go to more live gigs. Buy some new stuff, make sure I have the smaller stuff on order. Yeah… bit of a cheap plug but it started here, gotta make sure I get it finished within the next year. 4) Finish 52 Albums That Changed My Life (and other exaggerations) The Book version. The ladies that work at my particular Sunrise have gotten really good and reading my tastes but they can’t order in everything just for me. I have to get into the habit of figuring out when an album I want is headed to stores and pre-order it. They look like they put on a hell of a live show so hopefully, I’ll go see them the next time they are in Toronto. I’ve got to get into the habit of ordering the lesser known stuff so I have it the day it’s released. 3) Pay more attention to release dates/pre-order albums. I’ve been slacking a little in the past few years but I went and saw Front Line Assembly and Revolting Cocks a month ago and it reminded me of how much I love seeing a band with a crowd. And in connection with that…
2) Go see Ghost live.
New Year’s Eve Musical Resolutions and Revolutions from Writer Brent Chittenden