Metallica’s WorldWired Tour Sells Out Rogers Centre in Minutes–Anyone Surprised?

So is there something special about Toronto? It showed. Is it worth paying nearly twice the face value for tickets on the secondary market? Could this be an indication that the federal anti-ticket bot legislation, passed by both houses of Congress and signed into law by President Obama in December, is actually effective? The secondary sale offered by Ticketmaster was thriving: Seats in the 500 Level of the arena, face value of $55.50 to $81.00, were available starting at $95. At 10 a.m.  It’s likely hard to say: The stadiums where Metallica is playing are larger, mostly open-top stadiums for football or baseball teams, meaning they automatically have more seats than enclosed arenas.  In the States, by the time Toronto’s show had sold out, there were still plenty of seats available in all price ranges in Philadelphia, Baltimore and NYC/NJ. This probably won’t come as any surprise to anyone, right? Tickets were still available at BC Place, in Vancouver (general admission on the floor, $81); Commonwealth Stadium in Edmonton ($81, section K2, lower bowl); and Parc Jean-Drapeau – Ile Notre-Dame in Montreal ($259, Metallica Platform), which has outdoor seating. Hot on the heels of a new album that has the band returning to their biting, crunchy sound with fast guitars and thundering drums, not to mention the technically challenged but still well-received performance at The Grammys, fans were itching for the chance to see the metal gods again. local time on Friday, Metallica’s WorldWired Tour went on sale across North America.  We want to hear your feedback. Did any fans get seats directly? Within 20 minutes, standard-issue tickets—that is, tickets not part of one of four special packages at elevated prices, ranging from $329 per ticket to $3,299 per ticket—were sold out at Toronto’s Rogers Centre. By Friday night, even the luxury packages were sold out through Ticketmaster’s primary sale.
Metallica’s WorldWired Tour Sells Out Rogers Centre in Minutes–Anyone Surprised?

Dr. Luke’s Not Coming Across As A Great Guy Right Now

Luke’s Not Coming Across As A Great Guy Right Now Dr.
But this case isn’t ending any time soon, sadly. For example, these emails do not show that the lyrics of ‘Crazy Kids’ were, in fact, rewritten at Kesha’s request. This ugly, nasty, bitter lawsuit between Kesha and Dr. Luke might have hit rock bottom. Luke’s attorneys, sent a statement to Billboard, asserting that the emails were taken out of context. Considering he’s filed a lawsuit against her mother, that’s really saying something. She has repeatedly said she hasn’t been able to record in years, and despite assertions from Sony that she can work with a different producer and they’d put full support behind her work, she claims that isn’t true. The latest development involves some emails in which Dr. Kesha’s attorneys again are asking for a judge to “free” her from “her abuser and rebuild her physical, emotional and mental health.” This lawsuit has been working its way through courts in LA and New York City for three years now: Kesha is seeking to be released from her contract so she can sign with another label. In response to this disagreement, Dr. She’s being given the opportunity to record…You’re asking me to presume an entity like Sony, who is in a competitive position…will not want to make money on their investment.” Luke preferred “You see us in the club sip sippin bub”; Kesha wanted to sing “You see us in the streets we da we da freaks” instead, as it would be more believable because she doesn’t frequent clubs. “We were having a discussion on how she can be more disciplined with her diet. there have been many times we have all witnessed her breaking her diet plan.  In a previous message, the Post notes, “A list of songwriters and producers are reluctant to give Kesha their songs because of her weight.”
This message came a few weeks after on in which Cornia recounts, in an email to Kesha and her other managers, a heated discussion between Kesha and Dr. There’s another court date next week, a phone conference with the judge. In particular, there was a disagreement over some lyrics: Dr. this perticular (sic) time —it happened to be a diet coke and turkey while on an all juice fast.” The email was sent at 2:11 a.m. Luke about her song “Crazy Kids.” Dr. Luke,” who she believes will be fully vindicated in court. Within hours of the New York Post article’s publication, Christine Lepera, one of Dr. Remember that Dr. At an impasse, Cornia wrote that Dr. “If you were smart you would go in and sing it,” Cornia recounted. Luke wouldn’t come downstairs to join the group, asking, “she wears the pants in MY house?,” the article says. The larger body of evidence would show that Dr. Luke writes that he wasn’t “calling anybody out” when talking with Kesha about her eating habits. Luke, real name Lukasz Gottwald, provides some less than flattering and supportive instructions to Kesha through her manager, Monica Cornia. Luke reportedly told Kesha he didn’t “give a shit” what she wanted. In one email, published this week by the New York Post, Dr. Any claim by Kesha to the contrary is deceiving the public—just like her other meritless claims of wrongdoing by Dr. A year ago, the same judge, Shirley Kornreich, denied the singer’s request to be released from her contract because, in her view, “there has been no showing of irreparable harm. “Kesha and her attorneys continue to mislead by refusing to disclose the larger record of evidence showing the bad faith of Kesha Sebert and her representatives which is greatly damaging to them,” Lepera says. “Rather than agree to a thorough disclosure, Kesha and her representatives improperly publicized, without Court permission, three out-of-context emails which do not present the full picture regarding the events they concern. Luke produced the song. on June 28, 2012. Luke provides “tremendous support” to Kesha, including support in her struggles with her weight. Luke has claimed all along that he’s been supportive of Kesha and her career, that he loves and respects women, that all accusations against him involving any kind of abuse are fabricated.

Random Music News for Saturday, February 18, 2017

(Via Tom)
During this summer’s total eclipse in the US, Ozzy says he’s going to bark at the moon. The Grammy telecast has driven sales for Adele and Beyonce up more than 200%. Apple has turned some tweets into commercials. Michael Jackson’s tax trial continues. What a nice boy. America’s FCC has endorsed the use of the FM chip in mobile phones but has stopped short of ruling it has to be switched on. Now that Prince is on Spotify, a lot of people are streaming his stuff–and some of what’s being streamed is a surprise. Dangerous. Former major league pitcher and Cy Young winner Barry Zito is launching a career in music. Pop stars are continuing to bet big on gigs in Vegas. Coldplay’s Chris Martin came to the rescue of a charity event. Ten years, nine months, 21 days since 10,000 Days…
New trend: Duets with starts from beyond the grave. More cassette revival malarky. It’s weird. Still in Western Australia, drinking a local whiskey called Limeburners. And now, some music news…

Former Iron Maiden drummer Clive Burr has died at 56 as the result of complications of MS. Some fascinating reading on the neuroscience of music. Maynard James Keenan has started on the vocals for the new Tool album.
Random Music News for Saturday, February 18, 2017

How Did Early 2000s Emo Become Such a Joke

How Did Early 2000s Emo Become Such a Joke
I, for one, hated all of it for ruining the legacy of some of the original bands of the genre, especially those from DC. It was another way for millennials to laugh at our incompetent leader, yes, but it only worked as satire because it had another, similarly easy target in mind. Emo and pop punk in the early 2000s eventually won over a generation of teenagers not because it was cool but because, to paraphrase an earlier Saves the Day record, it didn’t care about being cool. Keep reading. The former had the advantage of being pretty much the dictionary definition of “cool,” but the latter did its damage on a more visceral level. Thanks to overwroughtness of bands like Dashboard Confessional, 30 Seconds to Mars and their ilk, early 2000s emo became a joke, a South Park punchline. “We noticed that @realdonaldtrump’s tweets are basically the lyrics to an early 2000s emo song,” they explained, “so we turned them into one.” The resulting video, in which Trump is depicted with a swooping bang of jet-black hair as a whiny, nasally male voice recites his tweets over compressed power chords, quickly went viral. There was a time a little more than ten years ago that it seemed every new alt-rock band was into some form of emo. This is from Consequence of Sound. A few days ago, the folks over at YouTube entertainment channel Super Deluxe thought they had stumbled upon a bit of comedy gold while perusing President Donald Trump’s famously petulant Twitter feed. But how? I remember this era well because it coincided with my own formative years as a music listener, my nascent sense of self torn between the aloof irony of The Strokes’ Is This It and the heart-on-the-sleeve lyricism of Saves the Day’s Stay What You Are (both albums released 30 days apart in the summer of 2001). Emo music has been the on-and-off subject of ridicule ever since it broke out into the mainstream 15 years ago, riding the backs of songs like Dashboard Confessional’s “Screaming Infidelities” and New Found Glory’s “My Friends Over You” to a new level of cultural prominence. And why?

New Documentary Looks at What It’s Like to be a Fan of Black Metal

New Documentary Looks at What It’s Like to be a Fan of Black Metal
The film follows three die-hard black metal fans from three different countries as they each make their way to Norway–the “Mecca of black metal”–on some kind of spiritual quest. It’s called Blackhearts. The DVD will be out April 11. Their personal stories form the basis of the doc.

Something Seems to be Very, Very Wrong with Australians’ Use of Music

Something Seems to be Very, Very Wrong with Australians’ Use of Music
Maybe these results are accurate. And surely Spotify would know that someone is screwing with the data and fix the results before releasing them. According to Spotify, this is the sexiest song for sex in Australia. It is the favourite sex jam for the entire continent. It’s a crisp 22 degrees, there’s not a cloud in the sky and I think I just saw a dolphin do something…dolphin-y about 100 metres out. But how? It’s not like I can, you know, tell them why I’m looking at them weird. Something you wanna tell us? Last week, news came about a Spotify survey released just in time for Valentine’s Day.  Here’s what came back:
Cantina Band (from the Star Wars: A New Hope Soundtrack) – John Williams
Birthday Sex – Jeremih
Sex (Cheat Codes x Kris Kross Amsterdam) – Cheat Codes
Sex With Me – Bonus Track – Rihanna
Pony – Ginuwine
Sex on Fire – Kings of Leon
Often – The Weeknd
Earned It (from the Fifty Shades Of Grey Soundtrack) – The Weeknd
Thinkin Bout You – Frank Ocean
Slow Motion – Trey Songz
If you made it past the first selection, you weren’t concentrating. It’s a lovely day here in Albany, Western Australia, as I tap this out overlooking the Southern Ocean. What’s wrong with you, Australia? Or maybe not. People around me must wonder why I’ve got this confused, slightly scared look on my face. The question was simple: What songs do Aussies most enjoying banging to? Yet I cannot overcome a feeling of trepidation about the people who live on this continent. Okay, okay, someone must have gamed Spotify. Everything okay? (Via Hhhhappy.com)

Introducing JAAK and MΞTA : A “Blockchain pilot for the Media & Entertainment Industry”

Today (Saturday, Feb. No additional information was provided prior to the launch, scheduled for noon EST Saturday.   18) at the European Ethereum Development Conference (EDCON) in Paris, Vaughn McKenzie and his partners Freddie Tibbles and Viktor Tron, introduced JAAK, a London-based technology company that has worked with the UK’s performing rights organizations and Viacom to develop a blockchain aimed at the media and entertainment industry. JAAK’s platform, MΞTA, is described as “a decentralized open network for organizations to capture, store, verify and communicate commercial metadata drawing upon both Ethereum and Swarm.”
Working with EY, Viacom, PRS and PPL, JAAK’s team “observed that the diversity of revenue streams associated with the rapid transition to digital (has) increased the number of organizations capturing, managing, exchanging and using digital rights and usage metadata. For more information, go to JAAK.io. Discrepancies found in the completeness, accuracy and management of this information can cause severe difficulty, or in many cases impossibility, when licensing content or remunerating the appropriate parties.”
JAAK will soon announce their official industry partners and begin accepting media and music groups to collaborate in using the platform.
Introducing JAAK and MΞTA : A “Blockchain pilot for the Media & Entertainment Industry”

Random Music News for Thursday, February 16, 2017

Random Music News for Thursday, February 16, 2017
This new lawsuit against Netflix, SoundCloud and Vimeo shows why the US patent system is broken and exploited by trolls. This radio station in Syria is fighting militants by broadcasting chicken sounds. F*ck this guy. Fed some kangaroos. Amazon’s new service is called Chime. Here are some of the music events that we’ll see. Good thing his publisher has a copy. It ended well. Maybe it has something to do with his Spinal Tap moment. Daft Punk is ready to launch their own Snapchat filter. Prince may be on Spotify, but Beyonce, Taylor Swift and Thom Yorke still aren’t (even though Radiohead is.)
Meanwhile, Spotify is moving into new HQ digs in New York and preparing to hire 1,000 more employees. Took a selfie with a koala. Woke up in Perth, Australia, this morning. Nickelback got into a brief Twitter war with Arnold Schwarzenegger. Yes, Lady Gaga was actually singing during her Super Bowl performance. What do the Cleveland police want with Justin Bieber? This is good: How in-ear monitors can help or hurt an artist’s performance. Posed with a wombat. Canada turns 150 this year. Mick Jagger says he has no memory of writing his memoir. (And Adele would know.)
Skype not doing it for you? More Oz: Axl Rose was denied a police escort in Melbourne. Carlos Santana said he didn’t mean what he said about Beyonce. And now, the music news…

Speaking of Australia, by the time you read this, Midnight Oil may have already announced their reunion.

Headstones Keep On Rolling. And Rocking, Of Course!

Our coworkers loved us! I’ve always been a big fan of The Headstones. Well, one of Canada’s most enduring hard rockers have signed with a new label and have some new music heading our way. Starting tonight, the band will be live streaming and posting through their social media accounts from The Tragically Hip’s Bathouse Studio in Kingston, Revolution Studio in Toronto, and Engine Room Audio in New York City. Legendary rockers Headstones are getting back into the studio today to record their forthcoming album entitled Little Army, which will be released this spring through Cadence Music. I’m not going to lie. Using an old school approach while employing new school technology, Hugh and company recruit their army of fans to be a fly-on-the-wall of the recording and launch of Little Army. You can track their progress via their social media:
Site
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram
YouTube I never said we were cool! I remember sitting in an office way back when and every time “Smile and Wave” would come on the radio we’d all do this stupid grin and wave motion at the chorus and then jump around. Headstones are bringing everyone into the fold and giving them an exclusive behind the scenes look at the making of this album, produced by Hugh Dillon and Chris Osti. Of course, the incredible and multi-talented Hugh Dillon has his own way of describing their new world:
Headstones front man Hugh Dillon, also thrilled about this partnership says, “It’s outstanding to see people in the music business who still give a shit about music, I haven’t felt this way since Picture of Health. It’s exciting.”
Never ones to stand still, Headstones have always been about the music, and the fans:
With Little Army, Headstones are again inclusive of their fans, sharing exclusive behind the scenes footage and real-time content.
Headstones Keep On Rolling. And Rocking, Of Course!

Palestine is Holding Its First Ever Music Expo

Palestine is Holding Its First Ever Music Expo
These will include record companies, booking agencies, music supervisors, festivals promoters and Media. But real life also goes on as regular people strive to have things other countries have. More details at their GoFundMe page. It will include various music genres and showcase performances over two days with a third day put aside for a little fun exploring.  We hope to shine the spotlight on the budding Palestinian Music Scene and share the beauty of our culture.  
  Like music festivals. The First Palestine Music Expo will be held from April 5-7 2017 in Ramallah, Jerusalem and Haifa. All donations raised will be used to pay for cover travel and accommodation expenses for our delegates as well as production costs associated with running and events and panels. The Expo will bring artists and professionals together, in an effort to build mutually beneficial relationships and develop valuable networking opportunities in Palestine. The public and our guests are invited to attend these shows in different Palestinian cities and interact with our artists to gain a greater understanding of our music scene and how we create music in Palestine. We will also set up a $10,000 fund to assist Palestinian musicians with international touring. The only time we tend to hear anything about Palestine usually has to do with some kind of conflict with Israel or another Middle East crisis.  It will showcase both established and upcoming Palestinian artists to local audiences and key members of the international music industry.

One Guy Plays All the Parts for Rush’s “Tom Sawyer” AT THE SAME TIME.

But now we have Dominic Fragman.   Pretty impressive. Geddy was the guy to watch, singing, playing bass, stomping on foot pedals and playing keyboards. Watch. Not only does he play all of Geddy’s parts in “Tom Sawyer,” he covers off Alex and Neil, too, at the same time. Whenever I went to see Rush, I’d marvel at how three guys could make so much music in a live setting. Okay, so he doesn’t cover absolutely everything, he does a pretty amazing job.
One Guy Plays All the Parts for Rush’s “Tom Sawyer” AT THE SAME TIME.

Where Do Most Internet Trolls Live? Here’s a Handy Chart.

The Internet was supposed to be a place for civilized and democratic discourse and debate. (I wonder why Canada isn’t on this list? Instead, it’s where all the trolls go to live. No wonder so many sites have shut down their comment sections. So where do most of these trolls live? This handy chart gives us some idea. Are we too civil?)

You will find more statistics at Statista
Here’s a Handy Chart. Where Do Most Internet Trolls Live?

Four Companies That Could (Should?) Buy Spotify

The only problem is that the IPO market has changed too. At the end of 2016, there were fewer than 6,000. Keep plugging ahead or cash in your chips and allow for some much-needed consolidation in the streaming space? The terms of Spotify’s $1 billion debt raise (which mean that Spotify pays an extra 1% on its 5% annual interest payments every six months beyond its previously agreed IPO date) suggest that Spotify was thinking the same way too. If it does well it will set up Spotify, but if Facebook’s continued aggressive feature-cloning on Instagram continues, it could underperform, which could change the entire environment for tech IPOs in 2017. Music Industry Blog looks at four companies that have pockets deep enough–probably $8 billion US deep–to buy Spotify outright. It would be a major strategic pivot if Spotify was to abort its IPO efforts and it begs the question: what next? And before you think you’re just going to hear about Apple, Google and Amazon being among the buyers, think again. And of course, Deezer aborted its IPO in 2015. In 1997, there were 9,113 public companies in the U.S.   Because of perpetually high licensing costs and massive R&D spending, some people wonder if it can ever make money. No wonder that they’ve pushed off their IPO again and again. The World Has Changed
When Daniel Ek and Martin Lorentzon were drawing up the Spotify business plan in the 2000’s, the music and tech worlds were dramatically different from what they are now. No fault of Spotify of course, but it is Spotify that could pay the price. So imagine for a minute you’re CEO Daniel Ek. Spotify is the galactic leader when it comes to streaming music services, but the company has yet to make a penny. 2016 was the slowest year for IPOs since 2009. Over the subsequent decade, those companies have fallen on harder times (though Microsoft is now experiencing a turnaround) and all of them have moved away from digital music, which is why an IPO seemed like a much better option for being able to get a large enough return on investment for Spotify’s investors. What do you do? Read on. The fact that only 15.4% of Snapchat’s stock is being listed may also push its price down. IPOs were once the best way for tech companies to raise capital but with the current VC bubble (and its recycled cash in the form of exited-founders reinvesting as Angels) equity and debt investment is much easier to come by. Snapchat’s forthcoming IPO will be a Spotify bellwether. For much of 2016 it looked nailed on that Spotify would IPO in 2017 and that the recorded music industry would move onto its next chapter, for better or for worse. The ‘Potential Exits’ powerpoint slide in Ek’s investor pitch deck would have listed companies such as Nokia, Microsoft, Sony and HTC. But now, word emerges that Spotify is looking to renegotiate terms with its lenders and there are whispers that Spotify might not even IPO.
Four Companies That Could (Should?) Buy Spotify

ISP to Pay $8.4 Million for Copyright Infringement

ISP to Pay $8.4 Million for Copyright Infringement
  “Nonetheless, there are a few instances in which Cox’s advocacy crossed the line of objective reasonableness. This is in addition to a $25 million penalty levied against Cox in November 2014, Media Post reports. Despite Cox’s arguments that it should be shielded from such lawsuits under federal copyright law, the judge disagreed, ruling instead that Cox was liable. On Tuesday, US District Judge Liam O’Grady not only reaffirmed the original verdict, he ordered that Cox pay BMG’s legal fees. Cox appealed, saying many of the warning notices it received from BMG on behalf of its clients weren’t reliable; BMG argued in return that Cox took no action to disconnect repeat offenders found to be sharing illegally pirated content. The record company sued Cox for copyright infringement because the ISP’s customers were sharing pirated content, something BMG believes Cox could have taken steps to prevent. In particular, both Cox’s attempts to obscure its practice of reinstating infringing customers, and its subsequent assertions of a deeply flawed DMCA defense evince a meritless litigation position that Cox vigorously defended.”
BMG’s defense of music rights and the intellectual property and copyright protections of artists is to be applauded, says David Israelite, president of the National Music Publishers Association. In what’s bound to be viewed a scary decision for internet service providers (ISPs), Cox Communications, a cable and internet company in Virginia, has been ordered to pay $8.4 million in legal fees to BMG Rights Management for copyright infringement. “As defenders of music creators, we applaud BMG for standing up to mass music piracy enablers like Cox, and we echo Judge O’Grady’s words that awarding legal fees reward plaintiffs like BMG ‘for facing up against willful infringers with deep pockets.’ The Court’s firm renouncing of Cox’s conduct serves as a stern warning to web providers who turn a blind eye to music theft.”
The appeal filed by Cox is still under way, Digital Music News notes. He stated that without such a large penalty, the cost incurred in such a legal battle might “deter other potential plaintiffs from seeking to enforce their rights.”
He also chided Cox for its leniency. “In a hard-fought litigation battle such as this one, discovery disputes and fierce briefings are to be expected, and they should not be held too harshly against either party,” Grady said, according to Hypebot.com. This was the first case in which an ISP was held liable for the pirating activities of its subscribers (although not the only one).